Today's News of 2013

Today's News

Today's News of 2013


Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania Graduation

More than 550 to receive BU degrees

Bloomsburg University will confer degrees to more than 550 students on Dec. 13 and 14. Seventy-three graduate students, including seven doctoral candidates, and 486 undergraduate students will receive diplomas during three ceremonies. Graduate commencement will be held on Friday, Dec. 13, at 6 p.m. The morning undergraduate commencement ceremony for the College of Education and the College of Liberal Arts will be held on Saturday, Dec. 14, at 10 a.m. and the afternoon ceremony for the College of Business and the College of Science and Technology will be held at 2:30 p.m.

All ceremonies will be held in Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall. Top honor graduates, the students in each College who have earned the highest grade-point average, are:

  • Christy Roberson, Danville, business administration major with dual degrees in accounting and finance, College of Business
  • Brooke Simonovich, East Stroudsburg, early childhood education major, and Heather Hamilton, Horsham, American Sign Language/English interpreting major, both College of Education
  • Timothy Dorsch, Schwenksville, double major in German and secondary education/history, College of Liberal Arts
  • Gabriel Barrile, Bloomsburg, environmental biology major, College of Science and Technology.

The undergraduate commencement speakers are two BU faculty members. Marion G. Mason, professor of psychology, will speak at the morning ceremony. Mason, who holds a doctorate in developmental psychology, has been a BU faculty member since 1992 and is the president of the BU chapter of Phi Kappa Phi.

Mark A. Tapsak, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, will speak at the afternoon ceremony. Tapsak has a doctorate in polymer chemistry and worked for nine years in the biotech industry prior to joining BU’s faculty 10 years ago. He holds 36 U.S. patents and has published 19 papers, most of which are related to medical devices and biomaterials.

Quiteh wins Harlon Hill Award

Husky Sports

The third time was the charm for Bloomsburg University's Franklyn Quiteh who on Friday night was named the 2013 winner of the Harlon Hill Award, symbolic of being the nation's top Division II player. Quiteh, who finished third in the voting a year ago and sixth as a freshman, becomes the second Bloomsburg player in school history to win the award joining Irv Sigler who won the award in 1997.

Harlon Hill Award

In the voting by the Division II SID's Quiteh finished with 182 points to 146 for Dustin Vaughn of West Texas A & M. Kevin Rogers of Henderson State was third with 100 points. Quiteh had 36 first place votes, 28 second place votes and 18 third. A consensus first team All-American (AP Little All-America, Daktronics, AFCA) Quiteh led D-II in rushing yards (2,195), rushing yards per game (182.9), rushing touchdowns (29) and scoring (15.7 points per game). @BUSportsinfo | Watch the announcement! | #HuskyPride

Another successful campus food drive in the books

Holiday Food Drive

Nearly 50 people spanning 13 local families will be given food and donations this holiday season through area food cupboards in Bloomsburg, Catawissa and Orangeville thanks to the 2013 Bloomsburg University Food Drive. Those who donated food items, financial support or time to assure a successful food drive are truly appreciated.

A special thanks goes to the Supervisory Roundtable, and the Secretary Roundtable for their financial support. Pictured (L-R) Charlie Chapman, Rebecca Musselman, Brenda Pitonyak, Audra Halye, Susan Hayes and Jim Paterson. #SenseOfCommunity | #HuskyHolidays

Greek Life a big player at TreeFest

Bloomsburg University Greek Life

Bloomsburg University fraternity and sorority members have been helping out at the Treefest. Members from Alpha Tau Omega started their day at the farm cutting down some 140 trees for the event.

Bloomsburg University Greek Life

At the consistory members from Delta Phi Epsilon, Alpha Sigma Tau and Delta Kappa Epsilon have worked hard to get the space ready for the hundreds of decorators and visitors to the event. At the end of the event our chapters return to wrap up the trees and provide them to local families in the area. About 140 families benefit from the trees from this event and the price of admission helps the Bloomsburg Theater Ensemble.

TreeFest begins with the area Christmas tree growers who donate over a hundred live trees to be trimmed. Then, hundreds of people — from community volunteers and youth groups, to florists and garden clubs set up and decorate the rooms and trees, which are each sponsored by an area business or individual. At the conclusion of activities, the trees are donated to area families in need, as identified by local social service agencies.

TreeFest will continue this week, Friday, from 5 to 9 p.m.; Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, from noon to 5 p.m. at the Caldwell Consistory in Bloomsburg. #SenseOfCommunity | #HuskyHolidays

Husky Unleashed!

Congratulations to Michael Regan, a senior social work major, who was selected by you as the winner of our Unleash your Inner Husky Contest. As a result, Regan wins a $3,500 scholarship sponsored by the Henry Carver Fund provided by the Bloomsburg University Foundation.

“Had I chosen a different school I don’t know if I would be doing what I’m doing today. So in a nutshell, Bloomsburg University has dramatically changed me life,” — Michael Regan

Kudos to Matthew Caraballo, a senior mass communications major, who won second place and takes home a $1,500 scholarship sponsored by the Henry Carver Fund. Let’s applaud the great work by all of those who entered the contest and cheer on the tremendous job by the five finalists for their inspiring videos! #HuskyUnleashed

COST Research and Scholarship Day

COST Research and Scholarship Da

Research ranging from pesticides in honey bees to analysis of gunshot residue to efficiency of antidepressants will be on center stage the College of Science and Technology’s Research and Scholarship Day on Friday, Dec. 6, at 3 p.m. in Hartline Science Center. #CollaborativeLearning

More than 15 projects will be on display and presented. Posters include “DNA Sequencing of Different Species of Fish Off the Coast of Mexico” by Leonard Oddo, “Analysis of Pb Concentration in Gunshot Residue by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry” by Thomas Malirski, “Adventures in Blood Clot Analysis by HPLC” by Kristie Darrah, “Evaluating the Gene AUSYSI for a Functional Iron Transporter” by Brendon Juengst, and “Solar Kiosk Overview” by Jim Capozzoli.

Research Presentations

  • “Vernal Pool Distribution in the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge on Assateague Island, Virginia” by Sarah Dodgin
  • ”The Distribution of Anurans Among Vernal Pools in the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge on Assateague Island, Virginia” by Paola Lunardi
  • ”Integrative Biology of Neonicotinoid Pesticides in Honey Bees” by Corey Bower
  • ”Analysis of Pb Concentration in Gunshot Residue by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry” by Thomas Malirski
  • ”Spectroscopic Analysis of Blood Clot Formation” by Amanda Lacerte
  • ”Adventures in Blood Clot Analysis by HPLC” by Kristie Darrah
  • ”DNA Sequencing of Different Species of Tuna Fish” by Leonard Oddo
  • ”Extraction of Equilibrium Constants and Limiting Conductivities From Conductance Measurements of Unsymmetrical Electrolytes” by Mike Jurbala
  • ”Phytosiderophore Affinity for Iron” by Chandra Dewar
  • ”Examining the Effects of PPAR Expression on Glucocorticoid-based Melanoma Therapeutics” by Ashley Wagner
  • ”Organometallic Synthesis of a Tricyclic Antidepressant Core” by Sawyer Davis
  • ”Vinylation as the First Step Toward the Total Organometallic Synthesis of the Core of Clomipramire (Anafranil)” by Ariana Winder
  • ”Solar Kiosk Overview” by Jim Capozzoli

FOCUS ministry wraps up semester

Bethel Deliverance International

Bloomsburg University’s Office of Minority Affairs will be hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Dec. 8, at 10:30 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Free breakfast at 10:15 a.m. If you would like to take part please contact Marcei Woods at (570) 389-4091 for details.

It's Pokémon!

What better way to "Unleash your Inner Husky" than through the variety of student life opportunities, from tackling a 30-foot indoor climbing wall or navigating an outdoor high ropes course to building life-long friendships in hundreds of student groups to gaining resume-building experience through a number of student leadership positions and opportunities.

With more than 250 student clubs and organizations , there’s a group just for you — from community service, faith, the arts, business, entertainment and athletics. #HuskyConnections | #GetInvolved

BU ranks highly on several top colleges lists

This summer, Bloomsburg University was ranked on several lists of top colleges for both Pennsylvania and the United States.

BU was featured on Washington Monthly’s 2013 Best Bang for the Buck Rankings, a national list of schools that help non-wealthy students attain marketable degrees at affordable prices. BU ranked 113th out of 1,572 schools in Washington Monthly’s broader rankings.

Online College Database, which uses data from the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Census Bureau, ranked BU 3rd on its list of top PA Colleges for Future Service members, which includes non-profit, four-year colleges that offer at least two ROTC programs on campus and charge less than $20,000 yearly tuition.

Affordable Colleges Online ranked BU 36th out of 81 Pennsylvania schools on its list of Top Colleges for Return on Investment, which takes into account low net costs and high lifetime earnings.

PR class raises more than $3,500 for local Women’s Center

Public Relations Fundraiser

Richard Ganahl’s Public Relations Cases and Problems class launched a campaign, “Safe and Sound Slumber Fund,” this semester to raise money for new mattresses and bed frames for The Women's Center in Bloomsburg. As a part of the campaign’s special events, a volleyball tournament was held on campus drawing more than 150 participants and raising more than $500.

Safe and Sound Slumber Fund

In total with other fundraising activities and events, the class has raised more than $3,500 this semester. Donations are still being accepted online through indiegogo.com until Friday, Dec. 20, that could increase the impact further.

The winning volleyball team received $125 dollars worth of prizes donated from Pizza Hut, Balzanos, Stephs subs, Olive Garden, Weis, Bloomsburg Local movie theatre and Subway. In addition the winning team also received specially designed Safe and Sound Slumber Fund T-shirts. Bloomsburg's radio station WBUQ 91.1 FM had two of their disc jockeys play music to pump up tunes throughout the tournament. Winning team was Team Bubbles, which featured Josh Hunger, Edward Donnelly, Travis Potter, Dayton Broyan, Matt Cashman and Ricky Cashman. @BUsafe_sound

More than 100k raised through annual breast cancer fundraiser

Breast Cancer Awareness Fundraiser

After 11 years it’s become an October tradition on campus, the annual Breast Cancer 5K Walk/Run coordinated by BU’s Multicultural Center has also evolved into an impactful supporter of the Breast Cancer Coalition. More than $100,000 has been raised since the first step was taken in 2002 in front of the Student Recreation Center, including more than $12,000 last month.

In that time, participation in the breast cancer awareness fundraiser has consistently grown. This past year had more than 500 participants, including more than 70 runners, representing more than 25 different campus clubs, organizations and departments. #SenseOfCommunity

Breast Cancer Awareness Fundraiser

2013 Breast Cancer 5k Walk/Run Winners

  • Most Donations— Delta Sigma Theta (Greek Life); Alpha Phi Omega (Student Organization); Elwell East (Residence Life)
  • Under 30 Male Runner — 1. Conor Renn- 19:04; 2. Cory Conville 19:28; 3. Wyatt Smith 19:47
  • Under 30 Female Runner — 1. Riley Renn 19:48; 2. Megan Ruland 20:20; 3. Kaitlyn McNamara 20:30
  • Over 30 Male Runner — 1. Wayne Hummel 23:36; 2. Bryan Renn 27:23
  • Over 30 Female Runner — 1. Kelli Renn 27:24; 2. Erin Kendall 27:55; 3. Kerry Carroll 33:45

5 simple steps to landing your internship

Professional U

An academic internship a great way to gain valuable experience, build a professional network and apply what you are learning in your classes. You can schedule an internship during the winter and summer sessions as well as fall and spring semester. Follow these steps to schedule your internship and be sure to start early:

  • Talk with your faculty advisor about internship requirements for your major.
  • Find an internship by clicking on Current Internship Listings. Internship opportunities are updated daily and can be sorted by major. You may also find an internship on your own or by checking other links or networking with family, friends and BU alumni.
  • Once you have identified an organization for your internship, check the active Affiliation Agreement list to make sure the organization is affiliated with Bloomsburg University. You can't get credit for your internship unless Bloomsburg University has a signed Affiliation Agreement with the organization in which you would like to do your internship. If your organization is found in the affiliation agreement list, skip to step 5. If not, go to step 4
  • No Affiliation Agreement? Bring the following information to your faculty advisor — name of the organization; mailing address; contact person and title; email; and phone number.

    Your faculty advisor will initiate the process of getting an Affiliation Agreement. It can take anywhere from 2 to 12 weeks to get a signed Affiliation Agreement back. Start the request process as soon as you are thinking about an internship. Once the Affiliation Agreement is signed by the organization and returned to the Academic Internship Office, your faculty advisor will be notified and you can complete the process with step 5.

  • Yes, there is an Affiliation Agreement. Complete Section 1 of the online 509 internship form. After typing in your information, print a copy of the form, sign and bring to your academic advisor for processing. Be sure to attach the internship job description to the 509 form. These documents are sent to the Registrar so that your internship will appear on your schedule. #ProfessionalU

Campus Construction Activity (Spring 2014)

Campus Construction Projects

Both lower campus and upper campus will undergo a series of construction projects this winter leading into spring and summer. Included here are a series of campus plans showing this spring’s more significant construction activity occurring across lower and upper campus. The approximate dates the projects will span are noted on the plans.

Upcoming Projects

  • Main Substation Medium Voltage Infrastructure Upgrades: July 21, 2014 - April 21, 2017
  • Columbia Hall Roof Replacement: May 1 – Aug. 15, 2014
  • McCormick Roof Replacement: April 7 – Aug. 15, 2014
  • Waller Telecom Generator: Feb. 17 – May 16, 2014
  • Lightstreet Intersection Intersection Reconfiguration: Future Project; Feb. 2, 2015 – April 29, 2016
  • Student Recreation Center Roof Replacement: May 19 – Aug. 15, 2014
  • Stair Replacements; Bakeless, Hartline, Centennial, Maintenance Center: May 19 – Aug. 15, 2014
  • Warren Student Services Center Roof Replacement: May 12 – Aug. 15, 2014
  • Bookstore Lobby Renovations: May 12 – Aug. 15, 2014
  • Elwell Hall Custodial Storage Renovation: Feb. 26 – April 15, 2014
  • Scranton Commons Main Dining: May 12, 2014 – January 16, 2015
  • Carver Hall Walks and Lighting: May 12 – Aug. 15, 2014
  • Sports Stadium Turf Field Resurfacing: April 14 – July 29, 2014
  • Nelson Fieldhouse A Pool Floor Repairs: April 24 – Aug. 1, 2014
  • Nelson Fieldhouse Floor Repairs: April 24 – July 25, 2014

Diversity Conference works to cross out prejudice

Bloomsburg University's annual High School Diversity Conference

More than 100 students from nine local high schools teamed together to collectively work on “Coloring Outside the Lines, Cross Out Prejudice” through Bloomsburg University’s 11th Annual High School Diversity Conference, hosted recently in the Kehr Union Building.

At the conference, students listened to speakers who specialize in multicultural affairs and racial equity, were entertained by several BUSTED on-stage performances on diversity and participated in small break out sessions, covering topics of:

  • Actions Speak Louder Than Words — You've heard that one-right? How about this phrase: "A picture is worth a thousand words"? BTE ensemble member Danny Roth brought two playful and powerful theatre games to this year's workshop, as a means to uncover how nonverbal communication with our peers can be a most damaging weapon in our battle against discrimination.
  • Beyond Labels: Stereotypes, Belonging, and Finding Who We Truly Are — Students formed groups and found labels that make them similar and different, exploring the positive and negative impact of these labels by creating a presentation using words, drawings, and images from popular culture.
  • Drawing the Digital Line — This interactive session encouraged students to think about their individual online experiences with bullying in places such as Facebook and Twitter, and collectively to develop strategies for responding to bullying in digital spaces.
  • Overcoming Adversity for Diversity — This session featured two girls who grew up navigating the foster care system talking about the tools they needed to overcome adversity, and how they continue to overcome the many obstacles that color their lives.
  • Who Should Survive? — After an atomic attack, 15 human people are the only humans left alive on the earth. It will take two weeks for the external radiation level to drop to a safe level. The food and supplies in the bomb shelter can only sustain at a minimum level of seven people. Who should survive? #SenseOfCommunity
  • Student leadership enhanced at annual Robert D. Lynch institute

    Robert D. Lynch Student Leadership Development Institute

    A group of Bloomsburg University students were among those who recently participated in the 27th Annual Robert D. Lynch Student Leadership Development Institute in Lancaster, where they participated in workshops examining cross-cultural communication, interpersonal relations, building inclusive environments and fostering cultural awareness.

    Sponsored by the Pennsylvania Black Conference on Higher Education, the leadership conference is designed to address topics essential to developing leadership skills for African-American, Latino-American, and other Black college students.

    Participants were Theo Guillory, Jahkere Wilson, Sharnise Dozier, Mark Brown, Carson Merine, Debbie Stolz, advisor; Tim Carpenter, Shaquel Elam, Shyree Clark and Justin McLoud. Guillory also received the Outstanding Student Award. #CoCurricularLearning | #HuskyUnleashed

    Honors group gets inside look at Federal Reserve System

    Bloomsburg University Honors Program

    A group of honors macroeconomics students recently visited Washington, D.C., to tour the Board of Governors Headquarters of the Federal Reserve System and the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing. After our tours, the group explored other government buildings and various Smithsonian museums.

    This semester, the students have discussed the Federal Reserve System and monetary policy heavily in class. It was a valuable educational experience vising these institutions, because the students are now able to apply it to their everyday lives. Seeing the process of money printing especially made a long-lasting impression on the group. #CollaborativeLearning

    Gender Studies honors soon-to-be graduate

    Bloomsburg University’s Gender Studies Minor program recently celebrated the upcoming graduation of Katelyn Shoemaker at its Fall 2013 GSM Graduation Reception. Shoemaker is graduating this fall with a major in anthropology and minors in gender studies and professional writing.

    The reception was attended by GSM students and board of directors.

    The purpose of the Gender Studies Minor, which offers cross-listed courses in sixteen departments across Bloomsburg campus, is the study of social, cultural, and historical constructions of gender and its intersections with other constructions such as race, class, nation, and sexuality.

    Students present research at PASSHE STEM Conference

    PASSHE STEM Conference

    A group of BU students were among the select students who presented research at the first-ever PASSHE Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics Conference, held this year at Slippery Rock University. The inaugural conference is a product of the Council on Undergraduate Research and PASSHE Workshops on undergraduate research in state systems and consortia. The workshops were funded by the National Science Foundation to bring faculty together and promote undergraduate research and scholarship by PASSHE students.

    Anthropology majors Michelle Mattar, Jared McAlexander and Katelyn Shoemaker, along with Renee Risalti, a biological and allied health sciences major, participated in this initiative by networking with students and faculty from all 14 PASSHE universities. Students participated in a student presentation competition. Risalti was honored with a Third Place Award for her poster, “Integrative Responses to Heat Stress in Lubriculus variegatus.” #CollaborativeLearning

    MAL well regarded at Washington D.C. model

    Bloomsburg University's Model Arab League

    Twelve members of BU’s Model Arab League (MAL) recently participated in the Model Arab League Regional Model in Washington, D.C. , where they developed a deeper understanding of the Arab world and learned about the most important social, economic, cultural, and political issues facing Arab leaders and ordinary citizens. In learning the art of diplomacy, MAL prepares students to become knowledgeable, well-trained, and effective citizens as well as civic and public affairs leaders. The students represented the State of Qatar.

    A.S.M. Tuhin was the Secretary General for the Model and Robert Nixon chaired the Joint Defense Council. Eric Pangelinan and Chad Haney won outstanding delegate awards for their representation on the Political Affairs Council, Eric Petrozino and Nick DeMarco won outstanding delegate awards for their representation on the Economic Affairs Council, Robert Compton and Mark Wells won outstanding delegate awards for their representation on the Join Defense Council, and Madalyn Goss and Monica Stypulkowski won outstanding delegate awards for their representation on the Palestinian Affairs Council.

    The Delegation as a whole won the Outstanding Delegation Award. Madalyn Goss was selected chair of the Palestinian Affairs Council for 2014-15. Also, Robert Nixon won the Outstanding Chair award.

    To join the Model Arab League, please contact Nawal Bonomo, advisor, at nbonomo@bloomu.edu or Madalyn Goss, head delegate, at mkg68919@huskies.bloomu.edu. #CoCurricularLearning

    Preschoolers get an expert lesson on safety

    Bloomsburg University Child Care Services

    Bloomsburg University’s Campus Child Center recently hosted a community helpers week, which was highlighted by a visit from Pennsylvania State Police Trooper Kyle Whitford ’10.

    Whitford, who graduated from the state police academy in January 2012, is currently stationed in Selinsgrove. He visited the preschool class prior to Thanksgiving break to talk about safety.

    Joining Trooper Whitford in the first row were Emily Ellender, Kayl Dreckman, Landen Guffey, Jameson Lapos, Gus Bauman, Hannah Magill. Second row included Bjork Millard, Quinn Yachimowski, Lisa Baier, teacher, and Cerick Austin. #SenseOfCommunity

    KUB student staff completes interactive safety training

    KUB Safety Training

    Initiated by April Garland, facilities and operations graduate assistant, the Kehr Union Building student staff recently conducted several safety training exercises, including how to properly put out an actual fire. Other training included evacuation plans, armed intruder protocol and a fire drill.

    Planning of the training event was assisted by Bill Perkins, manager of facilities and operations. Also assisting that day were the PA State Police, BU Police, Campus Safety and the Bloomsburg Fire Department.

    Participating in the training were students working in Student Activities Office (reservation desk assistants, main desk assistants, set-up crew, event staff, tech crew and student supervisors), as well as the Games Room employees.

    Student newspaper earns scholastic press recognition

    The Voice

    The Voice, BU’s weekly student newspaper, was recognized recently by the Columbia Scholastic Press Association, in its 2013 Gold Circle competition, which attracted 12,847 entries from student journalists from across the country. Tom Ciampoli , current editor in chief, received a Certificate of Merit for his sports commentary entitled “NFL Mock Draft,” published in The Voice on April 25, 2013. The Voice sports staff was also awarded a Certificate of Merit in Sports Page Design for their portfolio of pages from Spring 2013. Named in this award were Tom Ciampoli, Justin Hollingsworth, and Dave Kropp. In addition to these individual awards, the Voice also achieved Silver Medalist status in the overall evaluation of newspapers from Spring 2013 by the CSPA. #CoCurricularLearning | #HuskyUnleashed

    Business majors take third in international competition

    International Collegiate Sales Competition

    Bloomsburg business students Derek Franchino, left, and Michael DiVona, right, won third place in the International Collegiate Sales Competition held at Florida State University in November. Monica Favia, center, assistant professor of management and marketing, coached the BU students. DiVona, a marketing major, and Franchino, a management major with a minor in marketing, individually made the competition semi-finals and amassed enough points to place third among 39 universities.

    In the competition the students sold a product to individuals playing the role of industry buyers and were judged by industry professionals and faculty. Universities competing at the event included Duquesne University, The College of New Jersey, Ball State University and Central Michigan University. #CollaborativeLearning

    Science and technology careers on center stage

    College of Science and Technology Career Day

    BU’s College of Science and Technology Career Day, held on Nov. 15, exposed students to many different career opportunities, internships, research and graduate studies available upon graduation. This was done through the interaction with alumni, businesses, and professionals who work in the field of science and technology.

    Discussion sessions, business and organizational booths, and a free networking lunch gave students plenty of access to the professionals. More than 50 alumni were present representing a wide variety of science and technology disciplines such as the U.S. Census Bureau, USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Services, Geisinger Janet Weis Children’s Hospital, The Washington Center, Innovative Development, among others. #COSTCareers | #ProfessionalU

    Panel Sessions

    • Nursing, Computer Science, Exercise Science
    • Research, Digital Forensics, Engineering
    • Mathematics, Professional U: Experiential Learning/Academic Internships, Physics
    • Audiology & Speech Pathology, Environmental, Geographical, & Geological Sciences, Biology
    • Math & Science Secondary Education, Instructional Technology, Allied Health Sciences

    Students connect with alumni on Career Road Trip

    Professional U Career Road Trip

    A group of exercise science and marketing students got an up-close look at the sports performance and personal training industry on Nov. 13 with the help of several Bloomsburg University alumni at TEST Sports Clubs in Martinsville, N.J. Their on-site visit, which was the latest Career Road Trip arranged by the Office of Alumni and Professional Engagement, was coordinated through the exercise science, management and marketing departments.

    Professional U

    At the TEST facilities, marketing students got an overview of the company as well as a sneak peak at its business model and sales and marketing strategies, while the exercise science students spent the afternoon with TEST CEO Kevin Dunn and his football training staff. The students were able to see some of TEST’s state-of-the art equipment in action and even conducted a few professional training exercises themselves. TEST was founded by alumnus Brian Martin ’92, who currently serves as CEO of TEST Football Academy - is the No. 1 Football Training Company in the country, with locations in New Jersey, South Florida, and youth and high school camps nationwide.

    The day concluded with a mini networking session where students heard from two more alums, Mike Baker ’11 and Brian Fetterman ’12, about internship and job shadowing opportunities with TEST. #ProfessionalU | #CollaborativeLearning

    Business LLC lending a hand to help the environment

    Business Living and Learning Community

    Members of the Business Living and Learning Community recently collected items from the trash cans in Sutliff Hall, primarily plastic, glass and metal, that could have been recycled. The collection of recyclables occurred three days during the past week. Mentees are working on several different messages and methods to use to reach students, faculty and staff regarding the benefits of recycling and thinking sustainably.

    Members of the COB Marketing Faculty have agreed to serve as consultants as the mentees fine-tune their efforts. If successful within Sutliff, the messages may go campus-wide and perhaps into the community.

    Members of the Business Living and Learning Community joined approximately 30 other BU students, faculty and staff and members of the Bloomsburg community in continuing the annual shade tree planting project in town. The volunteers met on 5th Street on Saturday, Nov. 16 at 10 a.m. for a brief lesson in tree planting and then spread out over Bloomsburg planting 30 trees provided by the Town of Bloomsburg along town streets.

    The benefits of planting trees are many from combating greenhouse gasses, reducing utility bills, producing oxygen and even reducing the frequency of repaving. #SenseOfCommunity

    Nursing students give insight into CRNA career

    Nurse Anesthesia

    Bloomsburg University nurse anesthesia students recently visited the Danville High School to provide an opportunity for the school’s Health Careers Foundation class to have hands-on experience with clinical skills of a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA), also giving them insight into future career possibilities in health care.

    Working with BU students, the Danville students participated in skills such as intubation and airway management, and the proper technique for sterile gowning and gloving. In addition to the hands-on demonstration, BU students briefly described the educational process necessary to become a CRNA.

    BU collaborates its graduate nurse anesthesia program with Geisinger Health System, led by Brenda Wands, Ph.D., MBA, CRNA, program director, and Debra Minzola, MSN, CRNA, assistant program director. #CollaborativeLearning | #SenseOfCommunity

    Supervisory Roundtable carries on tradition of charity

    Supervisory Roundtable

    On the heels of its fourth consecutive first place Homecoming Float award, Bloomsburg University’s Supervisory Roundtable is on pace to raise more than $3,500 for local charities this year.

    A good portion of its float award money goes to benefit Camp HERO, Children’s Museum, Holiday Food Drive, Toys for Tots, Brighter Christmas Fund and two its own university scholarships. Participants on its homecoming float were Bob Wislock, Tom Patacconi, Frank Ohl, Judy Ohl, Jolene Folk, Ed Folk, Kevin Martz and Kim Martz.

    The Supervisory Roundtable coordinates several other fundraisers during the course of the year, including Trash to Treasure. Since 2010, the Supervisory Roundtable has raised more than $10,000 to support its charitable efforts. #SenseOfCommunity

    Enactus betters the community

    Children's Museum

    BU’s Enactus, which stands for Entrepreneurial Action and Us, is a team of students in the College of Business that strives to implement what they have learned at BU by doing projects that better businesses and the community. There are Enactus teams at universities across the globe. The BU team’s main project in 2012-13 focused on the local Children’s Museum.

    Through volunteering, promotion and fundraising with events such as a fun run, Enactus saved the museum more than $2,000 and used extra funds to create new signs for the museum throughout Bloomsburg. Enactus’ financial literacy program teaches students at local high schools basic financial skills, such as check-writing and the basics of credit and investing. This year they plan to expand their project to elementary school, middle school and collegiate levels.

    Other upcoming projects this year include a Campbell's “Let's Can Hunger” food drive project, a women’s economic empowerment project, and working with the local Kidsburg playground, to replace the children’s play area in Town Park which was destroyed in the flood of 2011. Enactus members attend yearly competitions to present the projects they have completed throughout the year. Last year, Bloomsburg’s team was named champion of their division at the regional competition in New York City and participated in nationals, which were held in Kansas City, Mo. #SenseOfCommunity

    A community partnership with co-curricular benefit

    Kocher Park Restoration Project

    Since the devastating flood in September 2011, the Department of Environmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences and Department of Biological and Allied Health Sciences have fostered a relationship with Kocher Park to clean up and maintain the area.

    In coordination with the Columbia County Conservation District, students and faculty volunteers routinely visit the park to pick up debris along the creek, prune vegetation and continue work on an ongoing creek restoration project to repair damage from the flood. The group, which was joined by the Honors Program this semester, completed its most recent park clean up earlier this month. #SenseOfCommunity | #CoCurricularLearning

    Be the best you at … BU

    Office of Dean of Students

    James Gould, Thomas Machovec, Jacob Ribecky — as well as Nicole Slagle and David Arnold (not pictured) — were recently recognized by the B the Best U at BU Campaign and Donald Young, dean of students, for their assistance in helping those who were involved in the car accident on Aug. 23. The B the Best U at BU campaign looks to recognize students who are dedicated to "Promoting service, civility, and respect in our daily lives with the people and situations we encounter and being the best person we can."

    We extend our congratulations and thanks to each student.

    Recognize your fellow students, faculty and staff — as well as community members — for their commitment to success at Bloomsburg University. Nominate those committed to adding to the Bloomsburg community through leadership, making an impact on someone’s life, providing service and demonstrating good deeds.

    Dean of Students

    • community service
    • leadership skills
    • academic success and improvement
    • involvement in clubs and organizations
    • and much more!

    Submit name, position at BU (student, staff, etc.), year in school (if applicable) and a brief description of how they contributed to the community … to Dean of Students, KUB 101, deanofstudents@bloomu.edu, 570-389-4734.

    A look into living and learning at BU

    Living and Learning Community

    Central Columbia High School hosted BU’s Education House Living and Learning Community, along with the LLC Center, recently for a presentation on the benefits of Living and Learning Communities on campus. LLCs allow students to work, study and socialize with those who have similar interests and majors. It offers students opportunities to get involved and become a part of the LLC family.

    • Education — For freshmen education majors. Helps students adjust to the uni- versity while offering support through academics and community service opportunities.
    • Business — For freshmen business majors. This LLC helps students build relationships with classmates and faculty as well as a sense of awareness of the business program.
    • Compass — This LLC helps undeclared students experience new and different things while transitioning to the university. A good way to get involved and take advantage of opportunities to find the right major for you.
    • ROTC — The ROTC LLC’s primary focus will be on leadership and citizenship. To qualify for the LLC students should either be actively enrolled in Army ROTC at Bloomsburg University or be interested in Army leadership.
    • Fredrick Douglass — For all declared or un-declared students. This community promotes academic excellence in a racially and ethnically diverse setting.
    • Helping Professions — The Helping Professions LLCs draws from ACT 101/ EOP freshmen with an interest in Education, Social Work, Sociology, and other helping professions.
    • Honors — The Honors LLC draws from freshmen with a minimum of 1150 SAT combined score. This LLC helps to form a close group within the honors program.
    • Leadership — Open to students in any major, this LLC focuses on developing leadership through teambuilding, small group communication, and decision making.
    • Presidential Leadership — This LLC draws from freshmen with a minimum of a 1050 SAT combined score, a 3.0 GPA and a background in extracurricular activities. PLP provides an integrated, sequenced set of programs to assist you in continuing your leadership development.
    • Science and Health Sciences — Open to freshmen who are majoring in Audi- ology and Speech Pathology, Biology and Allied Health, Chemistry, Exercise Science, Nursing, and Physics. This LLC works to make the transition a comfortable one.
    • Visual and Performing Arts — Formed to provide a vital link between the University and the Bloomsburg community by showcasing students’ artistic endeavors. The Center offers programs from the Departments of Art and Art History, English, and Music, Theater, and Dance to celebrate the arts and support the connection between the university and our broader community.

    Bloomsburg University Police officer honored for victim response

    Interacting with law enforcement can be a very unnerving experience for victims of domestic and sexual violence, according to The Women’s Center of Columbia-Montour Counties. However, the knowledge and training of law enforcement professionals — along with their conduct — can provide a catalyst for the victim’s decision-making process.

    In honor of BU Police Officer Paul Allen’s recent response to a victim at the Geisinger-Bloomsburg Community Hospital, the Women’s Center has present a recognition award for his exemplary action. Allen displayed unbiased support, empathy, a deep knowledge of the issue and appropriate resources and conveyed a clear message that victims must be must be empowered and have their choices respected. Thank you for setting such a fine example!

    Campus Alert: Tuesday, Dec. 17

    At approximately 1:10 p.m. today, the Bloomsburg Town police report the Uni-Mart on Lightstreet Road was entered by a single male wearing a grey mask, and grey and white coat. The male demanded money from the clerk. The male then fled on foot. Witnesses did not see a weapon. There were no reported injuries from the incident.

    This campus alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990. Bloomsburg Town Police are investigating the incident. Any information regarding the identity of this individual should be provided to the Bloomsburg Police at 570-784-4155. For your safety, there are emergency call boxes available throughout campus. If you are in town and need help, call 911.

    Campus Alert: Saturday, Dec. 7

    Bloomsburg University Police Department has become aware of a sexual assault that occurred at approximately 3:30 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 7, on a sidewalk in the front of the 400 building at the Honeysuckle Apartments. The Bloomsburg Police report that a female victim was approached from behind by a male assailant. He wrapped his arms around the victim and groped her genitals. The victim screamed and the male assailant threw the victim to the ground. The actor was described as being a white male approximately 5-feet, 8-inches tall and of average build. No clothing description is available.

    This campus alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990. Bloomsburg Town Police are investigating the incident. Any information regarding the identity of this individual should be provided to the Bloomsburg Police at 570-784-4155. For your safety, there are emergency call boxes available throughout campus. If you are in town and need help, call 911.

    A philanthropic legacy continued

    Benner-Hudock Center for Financial Analysis

    When Barbara Benner Hudock ’75 spoke to Bloomsburg University’s May 2013 graduates, she shared 11 Lessons for Life from her 38-year career in financial services and her lifetime of community involvement. The commencement address for nearly 1,300 graduates and families not only offered guidelines for success, happiness and fulfillment, it also demonstrated the value the CEO and founding partner of Hudock Moyer Wealth Resources (HMWR) in Williamsport places on the education she received from Bloomsburg University.

    The dedication of the Benner-Hudock Center for Financial Analysis in Sutliff Hall reaffirms Hudock’s belief in the quality of a Bloomsburg University education. It also recognizes the history of philanthropic initiatives established by Hudock, joined by her son and business partner, Michael J. Hudock Jr., in their most recent gift to the Bloomsburg University Foundation. #HudockCenter

    Semester homestretch is here, no fear ...

    The Writing Center enjoys easing the writing process for all students of every major. We are a free resource that supports undergraduate and graduate writers at any stage of the writing process. We are a diverse staff of writing consultants who represent a variety of majors and share the common goal of working to develop your skills and help you grow as a writer.

    You set the agenda for the appointment — whether you're concerned about getting started, or about clarity, grammar, organization, citations or any other aspect of writing or the English language. Appointments are highly recommended, but walk-ins are welcome — we look forward to working with you! #HuskyConnections

    Math contest equates to growth, popularity

    Bloomsburg University Math Contest

    Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania's Annual Math Contest

    In 16 years it’s tripled in size, peaking this fall with more than 300 students representing 24 high schools from across Northeast Pennsylvania. BU’s annual Math Contest has become quite the targeted fall event for many schools, some of which enter multiple teams to compete in brainteasers, quiz bowl, and the popular Game of 24 card challenge.

    Along with the Math Club, students and faculty from the Department of Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics coordinate and run the all-day contest. The three competitions vary in difficulty and work off a foundation of geometry, trigonometry, algebra, logic and statistics. Adding to the contest’s popularity are several alumni, who once volunteered as BU students, now high school teachers bringing their students back to campus as competitors. #CollaborativeLearning

    Students research downtown parking

    Bloomsburg Parking Student Research

    Bloomsburg Parking Student Research

    Led by student researchers, Stephen Staats, a senior criminal justice major, and Tony DiBiase, a junior geoscience major, a group of 30-plus student volunteers are conducting a creative parking study in the Town of Bloomsburg, utilizing mobile GIS devices not for mapping but to monitor downtown parking spaces and collect data to better understand parking tendencies. The hope is to improve Bloomsburg’s congestive parking situation. Success of this study could serve as a model for other municipalities across the country trying to improve their parking efficiency.

    The project, funded by the Bloomsburg University Foundation, Inc., is being done in collaboration with several local municipal agencies and university departments, as well as BU’s Center for Community Research and Consulting. #CollaborativeLearning

    Campus gets greener with new program

    Bloomsburg University Recycling Program

    Bloomsburg University has teamed up with the Bloomsburg Recycling Center to change the way BU recycles. Since July 1, BU has used a dual-stream recyclable collection program that has increased the volume of recycled materials and made collection simpler and more convenient. Vince DiLoretto, Bloomsburg University’s custodial services director, and Charles Fritz, Bloomsburg Recycling Center’s environmental services administrator, were two key contributors in the new program.

    With this system, the Bloomsburg Recycling Center can collect recyclable materials with as little contamination as possible. New dual-stream bins were placed throughout Elwell Residence Hall. With fewer bins at each site, the dual-stream program allows for more sites on campus, making recycling more available to students and faculty. #BUSustainability

    Students present HIS projects

    Honors Independent Study

    Honors students take two three-credit independent study courses where they work with a faculty mentor to complete a year-long research project. The final piece of their assessment is a 30-minute oral presentation along with a written research paper, which is open for submission for publication. Presentations will be held in the Honors classroom in Luzerne Hall, Room B-9. All are open to the campus community. #CollaborativeLearning

    Monday, Nov. 18

    • 2 p.m. – Erik Kile, Writing and Illustrating for Children’s Literature with Claire Lawrence

    Tuesday, Nov. 19

    • 3:30 p.m. – Samantha Smith, Perversion and Melancholia in J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye with Stephen Whitworth
    • 4 p.m. – Jamie Wagner, Mobile Learning in the English Class with Raymond Pastore

    Monday, Dec. 2

    • 2 p.m. – Sarabeth Clever, Media Literacy of Pre-Service Teachers with David Magolis
    • 2:30 p.m. – Audra Briggs, College Students’ Privacy Awareness on Social Networking Sites with David Magolis
    • 3 p.m. – Natalie Greenholt, The Effect of Linguistic Background and Listening Conditions on the Perception of Vowels with Petula Vaz
    • 3:30 p.m. – Adam White, Internal Accounting Controls in Non-Profit Organizations with Mark Law

    Wednesday, Dec. 4

    • 1 p.m. – Stephanie Giannelli-Frey, Methods for Educating the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in America and the Caribbean with Patti Stoudt
    • 1:30 p.m. – Brooke Shannon, A Computational Study of the Effects of the Electronic Medical Records System on Patient-Doctor Relationships with Christopher Hallen
    • 2 p.m. – Jordyn Koveleski, Do different scoring methodologies alter the results of three non-word repetition tasks (NRT, L8RT, CTOPP) for adults who stutter and their non-stuttering peers with Pamela Smith
    • 3:30 p.m. – Brianna Fox, Music Therapy: A Holistic Intervention for Cancer Patients with Mindi Miller

    Women empowerment first-hand

    Pennsylvania Conference

    A group of Bloomsburg University students recently participated in a unique women-to-women event, attending the 10th Annual Pennsylvania Conference in Philadelphia. Their visit was sponsored by the Bloomsburg University Foundation, Inc. and The Center for Diversity and Inclusion.

    The conference, one of the largest women’s conferences in the country, featured several nationally recognized speakers who focused on leadership, career advancement, small business entrepreneurship, personal development, social media, health and wellness, personal finance and more.

    Hillary Rodham Clinton delivered the keynote address. Other notable speakers included Madeleine Albright, Judge Glenda Hatchett and Linda Cliatt-Wayman. #CollaborativeLearning | #HuskyUnleashed

    PASSHE chancellor makes first visit to Bloomsburg

    Frank Brogan

    Frank Brogan, chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE), spoke faculty, staff and students at Bloomsburg on Wednesday in McCormick Center. While Brogan acknowledged the fiscal challenges that PASSHE universities are facing, he emphasized the important role that the 14 systems universities have in focusing on high-quality undergraduate education.

    Brogan previously was chancellor of Florida’s 335,000-student public university system. He was president of Florida Atlantic University, lieutenant governor of Florida and the state Commissioner of Education. Brogan’s academic career began as an elementary teacher in Martin County, Fla., where he worked his way up through the school system to serve six years as superintendent. He holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in education from the University of Cincinnati and Florida Atlantic University respectively.

    A glimpse of Saudi Arabia old and new

    Saudi Arabia Study Abroad

    Madalyn Goss, a junior political science major and Middle East Studies minor, will soon get a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to experience Saudi Arabia firsthand. Goss was recently selected to participate in the Saudi Arabia Exchange Fellowship, which is sponsored by the National Council on U.S. Arab Relations and is open to students who have participated in the Model Arab League (MAL).

    Goss will engage in a variety of activities during the 2013-14 academic year and will have the opportunity to travel to Saudi Arabia on an all-expense paid study visit over winter break, from Dec. 27, 2013 to Jan. 8, 2014. She is currently BU’s head delegate for the MAL Conference in November. #CoCurricularLearning

    Business LLC in the Big Apple

    Business Living and Learning Community

    Members of BU’s Business Living and Learning Community (LLC), which included mentors and a group of invited international students, recently spent a day in New York City. Participants each received a comprehensive booklet on NYC and learned about the business of art; partnerships between business, governments and non-governmental organizations to solve world issue; fine points of diplomacy; reflections on Ellis Island, the Statue of Liberty and the golden bull of Wall Street and, the business of Broadway.

    Highlights of the trip were a tour of the United Nations Headquarters, and briefing on UNICEF (Trick or Treat for UNICEF will be the LLC fall fundraiser); lunch and discussion groups at Battery Park; a guided tour of the Metropolitan Museum of Art permanent collection (the students noted that several items in the collection had been used as illustrations in their textbooks), and, finally attending one of three Broadway musicals — Chicago, Newsies or Rock of Ages.

    Faculty advisors for the LLC is Mark L. Usry, associate professor of business law, and Michael Martin, assistant professor of English, who are coordinating certain aspects of their courses — Introduction in Business and English 101 — into the student learning community.

    Psi Chi initiates eight new members

    Psi Chi Honor Society

    Psi Chi, the international honor society in psychology, recently held an initiation ceremony and dinner for its newest member. Requirements for membership are at least a 3.2 overall grade point average and a 3.5 or higher psychology grade point average. The honor society is advised by Jeffrey Leitzel and Kevin Ball, joined by student officers Jose Calvo, president; Lauren Heller, vice president; Laura Iacono, secretary; and Jacqueline Zeiber, treasurer and fundraiser chair.

    Welcome to Psi Chi …

    • McKayla Balliet
    • Kaitlyn Barnett
    • Andrea Green
    • Kirsten Guldin
    • Lindsay Mays
    • Janine Mensch
    • Jesse Rothweiler
    • Justin Wolfe

    Campus welcomes Frederick Douglass scholars

    Frederick Douglass Teaching Scholars

    BU is hosting five new visiting Frederick Douglass Teaching Scholars for the 2013-14 academic year, ranging from interpreting to school counseling to intercultural communication. The program is intended for individuals who are seeking academic experiences to help them further develop the skills needed to be successful university faculty members and scholars.

    Participants in the program typically teach full time (negotiable) and conduct scholarly research during an agreed upon combination of Summer, Fall, and Spring sessions. Scholars are mentored by senior faculty members and are expected to participate in campus activities. Scholars may also be requested to work with the Frederick Douglass Institute to develop and implement multicultural programing on campus.

    • Bridget Klien, Ph. D. candidate in anthropology at American University in Washington D.C. She teaches in the ASL/English Interpreting program.
    • Mindy Andino, Pd.D. candidate in education at Rutgers University. She teaches school counseling and student affairs.
    • Diane Cardenas Elliott, Ph.D. in education administration from New York University. She teaches school counseling and student affairs.
    • Kathryn Hobson, Ph.D. in communication and culture from University of Denver. She works with the Frederick Douglass LLC and teaches intercultural communication.
    • Jeni Rodriguez, Ph.D. candidate in interpretation at Gallaudet University in Washington D.C. She teaches in the ASL/English Interpreting program.

    Forensics Team showcases talent

    Forensics Team

    BU’s Forensics Team recently won the second place team sweepstakes award at the 18th Annual Morgan State University Invitational Forensics Tournament held the Morgan State University campus in Baltimore. BU also won the first place Pi Kappa Delta Team Award for universities with a chapter of this National Speech and Debate Honor Society.

    Twelve students competed at the tournament with seven students winning 13 individual speaking and debate awards.

    • Dan Clark, team president – first in poetry, fifth in impromptu speaking, sixth in single dramatic interpretation
    • Abe Freet – third in extemporaneous speaking, fourth in impromptu speaking, sixth in parliamentary speaker, second place in parliamentary debate with Zach Moore
    • Zach Moore – second in parliamentary speaker, fourth in extemporaneous speaking, second in parliamentary debate with Abe Freet
    • Joshua Hooks – second in after-dinner speaking
    • Abbey Porambo – fourth in poetry
    • Taisha Martinez – fourth in persuasive speaking
    • Anna Scott – top, non-advancing novice in prose

    Other students competing included Stephanie Kaminski, Delaney Hellman, Arrista Voorhees, Madalyn Goss, and Jaylene Alvarado. Rubin Rhodes, a graduate student in BU’s master’s degree program in school counseling, and Neil Strine, director of forensics, served as judges at the tournament.

    BU's Forensics Team meets every Tuesday at 9 p.m. in Bakeless 202. The program is supported by funds from the Community Government Association. All interested students are welcome to join and no previous experience is necessary. Interested students should contact Strine at hstrin2@bloomu.edu. #HuskyUnleashed| #CoCurricularLearning

    Re-imagining the student experience

    School Counseling and College Student Affairs

    Faculty and students from the School Counseling and College Student Affairs program attended the annual conference of the Pennsylvania College Personnel Association in Mechanicsburg on Oct. 20 to 22. Mark Bauman, Denise Davidson, Mindy Andino, Diane Elliott, faculty in the program, and Mary Klebon, April Garland and Ebony Taylor, graduate students, presented five different programs at the conference.

    Colleges and universities are under constant pressure to find new and meaningful ways to better engage students. Moreover, the need to justify funding and its usage is at an all-time high. College and university administrators, faculty members and students are actively encouraged to reexamine policies and practices to ensure a robust student experience. The 2013 PCPA Conference Committee is sought proposals to re-imagine the student experience through:

    • Learning outcome development and assessment;
    • Encouraging growth;
    • Advocating change; and
    • Delivering results

    Pictured (L-R) Mark Bauman, Mindy Andino, Denise Davidson, Keashla Marengo. Front Row: Serina Bolinsky, Ellen Socket, April Garland, Mary Klebon. Presentations included "What can a fellowship do for you?" by Andino, "Building relationships that enable student success" by Andino, Hoover, and Garland, “It’s not you. It’s me: Leaving your job In the first year," by Davidson, Bauman and Klebon, "Reimagining professional preparation," by Bauman and Davidson, "Got my mind on my money and my money on my mind," by Elliott and Taylor. #CollaborativeLearning

    Campus makes green changes

    Tri-Level Parking Garage Lighting Project

    Energy and financial savings are the goal of campus upgrades completed as part of Bloomsburg University’s facilities management department’s energy reduction plan.

    “We are working to implement Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) with short paybacks and large energy savings so we can start showing movement toward the goal,” says John Holtzman, assistant director of energy and environmental. The plan aims to reduce energy consumption by 20 percent.

    One ECM now underway is the installation of energy-efficient LED lighting in the lower parking area and stairwells of the tri-level garage next to Elwell Residence Hall. BU facilities staff will install LED lighting fixtures purchased through a sustainability account initially funded by energy rebates from PP&L Electric. This project will pay for itself in 18 months. The same type of LED lighting was installed by BU facilities staff in areas within Redman Stadium. #BUSustainability

    COB looks to students for suggestions

    College of Business

    BU’s College of Business has established the Student Advisory Board to provide a better educational experience for students. The board, made up of students from a variety of business majors, was established in spring 2013.

    The Student Advisory Board meets with George Ebbs, dean of the College of Business, to discuss upcoming events for business majors and provide feedback for recent programs. After this year’s Ziegler Institute for Professional Development (ZIPD) Conference, for example, the board suggested changes for future conferences to promote a broader range of experiences.

    “The Student Advisory Board benefits students because our ideas, as students, are being heard,” says board member Erica Harte. “This allows for more activities that will truly benefit the students.”

    A major project for the board this year will involve updating the College of Business Student Handbook.

    Order of succession established for BU

    Council of Trustees

    The Council of Trustees approved a resolution establishing Bloomsburg University’s order of succession during a brief special meeting on Nov. 8. In accordance with PASSHE Board of Governors policy, the Trustees identified the members of the executive management team who would act on behalf of the president in his absence or if he is temporarily unable to fulfill the responsibilities of the position.

    At BU, the order of succession is:

    • Ira Blake, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs
    • John Loonan, vice president for administration and finance
    • Dione Somerville, vice president for student affairs
    • Erik Evans, vice president for university advancement

    Amish, Mennonite photo essay on display

    Gary F. Clark

    The photo essay “Plain: Old Order Amish and Mennonites of the Central Susquehanna River Valley” will be on display in Bloomsburg University’s Kehr Union, Multicultural Center, from Nov. 1 to 30. This photo essay by Gary F. Clark, BU professor emeritus of art, contains 70 images of the Old Order Amish and Mennonites in everyday life.

    Opening receptions and talks by Clark will take place on Wednesday, Nov. 6, from 11:15 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. The exhibit will be open during regular building hours, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily.

    “I have always felt an urge to understand other people and to see life from their various perspectives. This is the basis of my art,” said Clark. “Seeking to understand those that appear to be furthest from me — those who live in worlds far from mine, worlds where different norms and rules prevail — informs and inspires my photographic art.”

    Yes, I want to become an OWL!

    Orientation Workshop Leaders

    Are you ready? Perfect! We’re ready to show you how on Wednesday, Nov. 6, at 9:30 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom. Join us for an open interest meeting where we’ll talk about all of the fun and leadership opportunities we’re involved in year-round, as well as how you can apply and interview to be an OWL in 2014!

    Wait, what’s an OWL?

    Orientation Workshop Leaders, or OWLs as we affectionately refer to them, are highly trained student leaders whose job is to help you adjust to life at Bloomsburg University. There are more than 75 spirited and talented OWLs who will serve as your personal hosts and share their experiences, tips and strategies for success. OWLs range from sophomores to seniors and cover nearly every major offered at BU. They live on and off-campus and are each involved in an average of at least three other student organizations on campus.

    In addition to hosting you during your orientation experience, OWLs are also a highly active student organization on campus. At any given time, OWLs are:

    • participating in fun community service activities
    • recruiting new OWLs
    • fundraising
    • going on group outings, such as amusement parks
    • participating in leadership training
    • and traveling to conferences

    Scientist addresses ocean drilling

    Alberto Malinverno

    Alberto Malinverno, of the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, will discuss potential energy sources and factors in global climate change at Bloomsburg University on Thursday, Nov. 7. Malinverno will speak about methane hydrates in the deep sea in a public lecture at 7 p.m. in Hartline Science Center 108. Later, he will meet with the environmental, geographical and geological sciences department.

    Malinverno, one of this year’s distinguished lecturers supported by the Consortium for Ocean Leadership, sailed as a logging scientist on research expeditions in the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. He will speak about deposits of methane that are trapped in ice in the deep sea, which are both a potential source of energy and a possible factor in global climate change, as methane is a very powerful greenhouse gas. He will review past studies and new directions on the subject. Malinverno’s visit is supported by BU’s Campus Green Initiative. #BUSpeakerSeries

    F.O.C.U.S. helps welcome in November

    Bethel Deliverance International

    BU’s Office of Minority Affairs is hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Nov. 10, at 10:30 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Free breakfast at 10:15 a.m. Campus shuttle available for upper campus residents. Come be part of the service. Contact Marcei Woods at (570) 389-4091 for more information.

    Gender Studies research hits center stage

    Gender Studies Undergraduate Research

    Students working toward a minor in Gender Studies will present their research on Tuesday, Nov. 5, at 10 a.m. in Andruss Library's Schweiker Room. The presentations are free and open to the public. The purpose of the Gender Studies Minor, which offers cross-listed courses in sixteen departments across campus, is the study of social, cultural, and historical constructions of gender and its intersections with other constructions such as race, class, nation, and sexuality.

    The program investigates gender relationships and inequalities in a variety of societal contexts and strives to provide co-curricular experiences to enhance the Gender Studies Minor curriculum and raise awareness about issues of gender.

    • Michelle Mattar, Anthropology Major “Digging Deeper: Why Does Archaeology Continue to Struggle with Gender?”.
    • Venyamína McIvor, Psychology Major “Transmisogyny: The Assumptions We Make about Female Bodies, and How They Subjugate Our Sisterhood”
    • Karli Miller , English Major “One Step Forward, Two Steps Back: The Progression of LGBTQ Rights in the World”.
    • Katelyn Shoemaker, Anthropology Major “Women in Politics”.
    • Albra Wheeler, Communication Studies Major “The Wonderbra: Oppression versus Liberation in Capitalistic Patriarchal Society”.

    It's time to “Unleash your Inner Husky"

    “Unleash Your Inner Husky means to not be afraid of dreaming big because there will always be support of those around you when following your passions and striving to be the best you can be," — Megan Van Doren, Class of 2016

    Huskies are leaders. They are motivators with a determination and driving spirit that doesn’t let anything get in their way when they are unleashed. Create a short video about how Bloomsburg University has made a difference in your life. How has your educational experience at BU transformed or changed you? Submit your entry at bloomu.edu/yourstory by Friday, Nov. 1, at noon. Your story could win one of two scholarships — $3,500 for first place or $1,500 for second place. And, just for entering, you’ll receive a T-shirt! #HuskyUnleashed

    Husky Connections: Dialing up 91.1 FM

    WBUQ is a student-run radio station that broadcasts from the McCormick Center on 91.1 FM with a signal radius of 25 to 30 miles. This semester, WBUQ began streaming on the Internet allowing for a worldwide audience. Show openings are available for a wide variety of students, including DJ positions. WBUQ gives students the opportunity to work, hands on, with new digital broadcasting equipment. #HuskyConnections

    A burger is just a burger, until ...

    This fall, BU’s Dining Services unveiled the new Burger Studio in the Husky Lounge giving students an open griddle for burger creativity. As a result, BU became one of more than 600 colleges and universities with the creative ARAMARK feature. Using electronic touch-screen ordering kiosks, students design their own “masterpiece” made to order, by selecting an Angus, chicken or veggie burger customized with more than 30 toppings, cheeses and special sauces. The kiosks prompt each customer with a variety of choices, and then visually create the order by building the sandwich, piece by piece on the kiosk screen. #HuskyConnections

    Getting a treat up on Trick-or-Treating

    Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania's Greek Life

    More than 50 members of Greek Life volunteered their time Friday, Oct. 25, to help the Town of Bloomsburg with its annual downtown Trick-or-Treat event, greeting trick-or-treaters, handing out candy and manning a majority of the 30-plus participating businesses’ candy and treat locations.

    More than 700 parents and little trick-or-treaters ventured downtown visiting business locations, followed by a Halloween event at the Moose Exchange that featured more candy, craft activities and Halloween-themed games. #SenseOfCommunity | #BUGReekLife

    A time to catch up, or get ahead

    Steve Kokoska

    Bloomsburg University will be holding a winter sessions from Dec. 16, 2013 to Jan. 17, 2014. Current students will be able to schedule winter classes starting Friday, Nov. 1, as they normally do in ISIS. There is a maximum of three credits allowed, with exceptions made by the department chairperson and college dean.

    "Taking a class during Winter College (Dec. 16, 2013 to Jan. 17, 2014) can be a time to catch up on classes they need or get ahead in their academic program,” says Steve Kokoska, professor of mathematics, computer science and statistics, who will be teaching an online statistics course this winter. “It’s also a time when students and faculty can do unique things like study abroad or work on research together in a very focused way.”

    Winter Session Parking

    If you're attending class for the Fall 2013 semester, your decal will be valid throughout the winter session. No decals are needed if you are a new Commuter or Resident for the winter session. If you're a new Commuter student please park in the “Commuter Lots.” If you're a new Resident student please park in the “First Street (Green) Lot”. If you park in other lots you may be ticketed. Any parking questions, contact University Police at 570-389-4168. Designated Parking Lots

    You are what you laugh at

    Jerry Zolten

    Jerry Zolten, an associate professor of communication arts and sciences, American studies, and integrative arts at Penn State Altoona, will present, “You are What You Laugh At,” on Wednesday, Oct. 23, at 7 p.m. in KUB Multipurpose B. Drawing on rare video and audio clips, he will present an overview of stand-up comedy history from minstrelsy to halcyon days to the comedy revolution of the 1960s. Zolten visit is sponsored by the Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence.

    Along the way, he offers insight into changing techniques and content, the greats of the genre, comedy's role in both reinforcing and countering ethnic stereotypes, freedom of speech issues, and the power of comedy to foment social change. #BUSpeakerSeries

    Medieval literature comes to life for English students

    English Students Renaissance Faire

    Students of English 341 – Medieval Literature recently visited the PA Renaissance Faire to experience some approximation of the material culture and activities associated with the Middle Ages. Students have been studying the original stories of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table by writers such as Chretien de Troyes and Sir Thomas Malory.

    At the faire, students witnessed a game of human chess, a board game invented during the Middle Ages; listened to talks on archery, sword-making, glassblowing, and falconry; and watched several sessions of tournament and combat jousting, a form of military training common in the medieval period. Medieval and Renaissance torture devices were on prominent display during this Halloween season. #CoCurricularLearning

    Self expression and popcorn discovery on display

    Old Science Hall Art Projects

    Stop by Old Science Hall to see what students in 3D Design and Intermediate Digital Art have been working on this semester. Students in Ron Lambert's 3D Design class installed a project, “Rendering Volume” on the second floor. The project was multi-faceted and started with students making line drawings of a piece of popcorn. They then had to imagine what kind of structural system would be inside the popcorn to give it its shape and draw that system.

    Those drawings worked as a reference point from which the students fabricated these structures out of 3/8' wooden rods. The idea behind the project was to think about structural support, how to describe volume, how to work within a system, as well as the aesthetic of structures as an interesting design. The class came up with a variety of designs, each very different, that represents how they understood the project.

    Also on view in Old Science Hall are examples of artwork created in Sue O'Donnell's Intermediate Digital Art class. The artwork in Old Science Hall lobby are solutions to a typography assignment where students are asked to create a self-portrait using a typeface that has characteristics they relate to. Each portrait is created using layers of text and is accompanied with an artist statement, written by the student, that helps inform the viewer about the choices made. #HuskyUnleashed | #CollaborativeLearning

    Greek Life continues strong charitable efforts

    Greek Life Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Fundraiser

    Delta Phi Epsilon raised more than $150 for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation with its recent Pie-A-Deepher event on campus. With a donation, participants smashed a pie in the face of a sorority sister. The pie event was the latest community service event coordinated by Delta Phi Epsilon to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, which included a kickball game last spring and Applebee’s fundraiser last fall.

    The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is the world’s leader in the search for a cure for cystic fibrosis. It funds more CF research than any other organization and nearly every CF drug available today was made possible because of foundation support. The foundation is a nonprofit donor-supported organization dedicated to attacking cystic fibrosis from every angle. Its focus is to support the development of new drugs to fight the disease, improve the quality of life for those with CF, and ultimately to find a cure. #BUGreekLife #SenseOfCommunity

    English students explore “Why Children’s Books Matter”

    Feminist Reading of Culture

    Students in English 288 – Feminist Reading of Culture traveled to New York City on Wednesday, Sept. 18, to visit the New York Public Library exhibit entitled, “The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter,” as part of their exploration of fairy tales and gender representation this semester.

    Student particularly enjoyed learning about banned children’s books and children’s literature from other cultures. Students also attended a performance of the newly adapted Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella on Broadway, which offered a Cinderella more in control of her own glass slipper.

    The trip was sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts Curriculum Enhancement Grant and the English Department. #CoCurricularLearning

    Beta Gamma Sigma named exemplary chapter

    Beta Gamma Sigma

    BU’s Beta Gamma Sigma Chapter has been named Exemplary Chapter for the 2012-13 year. Beta Gamma Sigma is an honor society that encourages academic achievement in the study of business. According to the Survey of Member Acceptance conducted by Beta Gamma Sigma, Bloomsburg’s chapter had an 80 percent acceptance rate.

    As an Exemplary Chapter, the society will recognize Bloomsburg University in both their print and electronic publications. The Bloomsburg chapter will also be eligible to participate in Beta Gamma Sigma’s Matching Funds Scholarship Program, a program that provides $500 in matching funds to qualifying chapters. This year, Bloomsburg’s chapter is qualified to enter in the 2014 Outstanding Collegiate Chapter Advisor Recognition program. For more information on Beta Gamma Sigma, contact professor Lam Nguyen at lnguyen@bloomu.edu. #GetInvolved

    Now THIS is an internship

    Tyler Montgomery

    Tyler Montgomery, a junior marketing major and French minor, is working for the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources as part of a 15-week internship sponsored by the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). Montgomery is one of 14 students participating in The Harrisburg Internship Semester (THIS) program, which provides students the opportunity to work in all areas of state government while earning a full semester’s worth of credits. THIS invites students from each of the 14 PASSHE universities to participate.

    Montgomery will attend several academic seminars during their fall semester internship. Each of the students also will complete an individualized research project as part of the program’s requirements. More than 500 students from PASSHE universities have participated in THIS since the program began in 1989, each gaining valuable insight into the workings of state government at the policy-making level. Interns have worked with dozens of state agencies, as well as in the offices of the governor, the speaker of the House of Representatives and the attorney general. PASSHE students interested in participating in THIS in a future semester may contact their individual campus coordinator or their university’s cooperative or internship office, or by calling the Dixon University Center at 717-720-4089.

    Celebrating life and nature through art

    Tanya Torres

    An exhibit by Tanya Torres on “Heaven and Earth: A Meditation on the Symbols of the Puerto Rican Heart,” will be hosted by the KUB Multicultural Center on Wednesday, Oct. 23, at 7 p.m. During the exhibition Torres will also present a lecture on her work.

    Torres is an artist and writer living and working in New York City. She was born in 1969 in New York City of Puerto Rican parents and spent her childhood in Puerto Rico. She came back to live in New York City at age 15. Most recently, her exhibition Heaven and Earth, traveled to Prague and was exhibited at the Prague Congress Centre. It will travel to several places in the United States during the year 2013.

    The exhibition and lecture is co-sponsored by Campus Wide on Human Relations, Office of Multicultural Affairs, International Faculty Association and the Department of Languages and Cultures.

    Oregon Duck discusses student leadership

    Tyson Wooters

    Tyson Wooters, former mascot of the University of Oregon, will be on campus to present “Always Wear Your Head” on Tuesday, Oct. 22, at 7 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom, presented by the Office of Multicultural Affairs. For four years as the Oregon Duck, he danced, performed stunts, rallied the crowd … even threw himself backwards into the student cheering section, creating the Duck Surf.

    Just as he spent years firing up college football fans, today Wooters draws on his very unusual experience to fire up student audiences looking for a fun, meaningful message about student empowerment and leadership. In his keynote, Wooters is helping students nationwide understand how every person in a college community has a contribution to make. His visit is co-sponsored by the Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence. #BUSpeakerSeries

    PASSHE award open to all seniors

    Syed R. Ali-Zaidi Award for Academic Excellence

    BU students are invited to nominate an outstanding senior for the annual Syed R. Ali-Zaidi Award for Academic Excellence, sponsored by the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education Foundation. Ali-Zaidi, a charter member of PASSHE’s Board of Governors, established the award to inspire and honor PASSHE students who excel in the pursuit of knowledge.

    The 2014 award recipient will receive a medallion and $1,000; two semi-finalists will receive $500. Bloomsburg University has had two finalists for the award in the past several years. To nominate yourself or another senior, send the nomination packet to Jessica Beaver, Office of Planning and Assessment, McCormick Center 2203, jbeaver@bloomu.edu, by Friday, Nov. 1.

    You're on QVC!

    Alumni Career Building

    Discover your career path, just like BU alumni Lori ('87) and Sean ('87) Pickford. They have been national spokespersons and salespersons for numerous Fortune 500 Companies on QVC Inc., specializing in highly effective televised sales presentations for products being sold through electronic retailing including multimillion dollar global brands and sales presentations in the US and Canada.

    Lori and Sean have extensive experience with live broadcasting, on-air execution of sales strategies, creation of effective feature/benefit analysis, as well as video production. Lori graduated with a bachelor’s degree in business economics, and Sean earned a bachelor’s degree in mass communications.

    Join us on Monday, Oct. 21, from 5 to 5:50 p.m. in Centennial Hall 164. Alumni will be available afterwards for one-on-one discussions. Space is limited and student registration is required!

    Roozt.com founder joins speaker series

    Brent Freeman

    Join BU’s Beta Gamma Sigma members for a live webcast with Brent Freeman, founder and CEO of Roozt.com. His presentation, “Social Entrepreneurship: Becoming a Catalyst for Change,” is part of Beta Gamma Sigma’s Meet the Leaders of Business Speaker Series.

    Roozt.com is the world’s online marketplace to discover the unique brands that give back at members only prices. For every member who joins, Roozt donates a meal to an American in need. One member. One meal. Featured on The Today Show, NBC, ABC, Mashable, Huffington Post, Fast Company, Inc.com, Pando Daily, and others, Roozt.com curates the coolest socially conscious brands and puts them under one roof for a streamlined shopping experience.

    The free webcast will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 15, at 5:45 p.m. in Hartline G38. Pizza and refreshments will be served. Contact Emily Bostian, student VP of Beta Gamma Sigma, at erb61985@huskies.bloomu.edu, or Lam Nyguyen, faculty advisor, at nguyen@bloomu.edu for more information.

    An in-depth look at campus energy use

    Bloomsburg University Building Dashboard

    Anyone strolling around Bloomsburg University’s campus may have noticed a new kiosk resembling a bus shelter past the northeast side of Ben Franklin Hall. Behind it sits two light poles topped with solar panels.

    The kiosk is phase two of a four-phase energy project coordinated by BU faculty members Nathaniel Greene and Jeff Brunskill and assistant director of facilities management John Holtzman. The kiosk is designed to educate the BU community about solar energy and the university’s energy consumption using Lucid Design Group’s Building Dashboard software. The project ultimately aims to develop energy-saving strategies for the university.

    The Building Dashboard touchscreen software will also allow users to take an in-depth look at energy use in five campus buildings: Hartline Science Center, Student Recreation Center, Nelson Field House, Columbia Residence Hall and Elwell Residence Hall. These buildings were chosen because they are popular with students or large consumers of energy. #BUSustainability

    Gingrich-Jones speaks about LGBT issues

    Candace Gringrich

    BLGBT activist Candace Gingrich-Jones will present a lecture, “The Accidental Activist: A Personal and Political Journey,” Monday, Oct. 7, at 7 p.m. in Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania’s Kehr Union Ballroom. The presentation is free and open to the public. Gingrich-Jones is the half-sister of former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich. She has traveled around the country to promote the importance of coming out, the duty to vote and the power of conversations to change minds.

    Gingrich-Jones is associate director of the Human Rights Campaign’s Youth and Campus Outreach Program. Her 1996 autobiography, “The Accidental Activist,” was a bestseller in the LGBT community. Gingrich-Jones has been profiled in national newspapers and magazines, guest-blogged at Huffington Post and appeared on “Good Morning America,” “Countdown with Keith Olbermann” and the “Queen Latifah Show.” #BUSpeakerSeries

    Are you a leader? Then let’s certify it.

    Center for Leadership and Engagement

    BU’s Center for Leadership and Engagement is accepting student applications for the BU Leadership Certification program, which is free and open to all students. The program is comprised of three levels with a combination of educational workshops and engagement and service experiences.

    If you’re planning on applying to be an OWL or a CA for the 2014-15 school year, it's very important you visit the Center for Leadership and Engagement and complete Level 1 of the certification program. This program is also designed for any student who is currently in or wants to serve in a leadership position on campus (executive boards, mentors, ambassadors, team captains, OWLS, CAs, Greek Life, athletics, government, committee chairs, volunteers, etc.)

    Enhance your resume, get involved and get credit for what you are doing as a student leader! The Center for Leadership and Engagement (Luzerne Hall first floor) is open Monday through Thursday, noon to 10 p.m., and Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Any questions, please contact George Kinzel at gkinzel@bloomu.edu.

    Sabbaticals Granted

    Council of Trustees

    Sabbaticals that will be in effect the fall 2014/spring 2015 academic year: Joseph Andreacci, Exercise Science and Athletics; Joan Benek-Rivera, Management and Marketing; Janice Broder, English; Drue Coles, Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics; Laura Davis, Business Education and Information & Technology Management; Christopher Donahue, Languages and Cultures; Margie Eckroth-Bucher, Nursing; Richard Ganahl, Mass Communications; Stephen Kokoska, Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics; Claire Lawrence, English; Wendy Lee, Philosophy; Youmin Lu, Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics; Lori Metzger, Nursing; Sue O’Donnell, Art and Art History; David Randall, English; Mehdi Razzaghi, Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics; John Riley, Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics; Timothy Rumbough, Communication Studies; Kurt Smith, Philosophy; and Walter Zilz, Exceptionality Programs.

    Husky Pride Day

    Campus celebrates Husky Pride Day

    Husky Pride Day

    With the start of a new school year upon us and the fall sports season kicking off this week, we're going all out … all maroon and gold to celebrate the third annual Husky Pride Day. Show us your best school spirit and “Inner Husky” as we kick it up a notch for the fall semester.

    Congratulations to the Student Health Center, which was chosen as the winner of the Husky Pride Day contest. Its staff wins lunch at Balzano's courtesy of the University Foundation. Congratulations to the Development Center, which was chosen as runner up. Its staff will receive free tickets to an upcoming Huskies football game courtesy of the Athletics Department. #HuskyPride

    Taking whatever life throws at you

    Juan Jimenez

    Juan Jimenez’s educational journey hasn’t followed the easiest of paths. However, according to those who know him best, this laid back influential Husky wouldn’t want it any other way.

    Jimenez, a senior accounting and finance major, is on target to graduate from Bloomsburg University with not just one but two bachelor’s degrees. He will also walk across the graduation stage with a job offer already in hand — a position with the prestigious accounting firm Deloitte Touche, one of the “big four” firms in the world with PricewaterHouseCooper, Ernst & Young, and KPMG. #HuskyUnleashed

    U.S. News ranks BU among the best

    U.S. News Best Colleges

    Bloomsburg University is again listed as one of the best universities in the country, according to U.S. News and World Report’s annual ranking of U.S. colleges and universities. In data released this week, U.S. News lists BU as number 95 of the Best Regional Universities for the northern region, tied with Eastern University and the University of St. Joseph. Bloomsburg is fifth among institutions in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). Last year, U.S. News rated BU at 104.

    Best Regional Universities ranks institutions that offer a full range of undergraduate degrees and some master’s programs but few, if any, doctoral degrees. The 621 universities in the category are ranked against their peer group in one of four geographic regions – north, south, midwest and west.

    Cameroon Scholars Lecture Series

    Cameroon Scholars Lecture Series

    One of the four visiting professors from the University of Buea in Cameroon will be presenting a public lecture at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 24, in Hartline Science Center 108. Samuel Ayonghe, professor environmental geology and associate dean of faculty of science at University of Buea, will present, "Climate Change and Natural Hazards in Africa: The Case of Cameroon."

    Environmental science is one of the key aspects of the experiential learning component of BU's winter study abroad program in Cameroon-Ethiopia. Ayonghe's lecture is sponsored by the President's Office, College of Science and Technology and the Global Education Office. #BUSpeakerSeries

    Do you want to make a difference on campus?

    Peer Assisted Student Success

    BU’s Dean of Students Office is searching for mentors. Do you have 24-plus credits? Is your grade point average 2.50 or higher? Then our Peer Assisted Student Success (PASS) mentor program may be a perfect fit.

    PASS is looking for students who are interested in making a positive impact here at Bloomsburg University by working with first year students, students in need of positive support, or students that are required to participate as mentees through the Dean of Students Office. If you are interested in being a mentor with the PASS program please contact deanofstudents@bloomu.edu or visit bloomu.edu/dean-students-pass for more information and how to sign up!

    Cameroon Scholars Lecture Series

    Cameroon Scholars Lecture Series

    One of the four visiting professors from the University of Buea in Cameroon will be presenting a public lecture at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 18, in Andruss Library's Schweiker Room. Justine Ayuk, lecturer from the University of Buea's Gender Studies Department, will present "Gender and Development in Cameroon."

    Gender Studies is one of the key aspects of the experiential learning component of BU's winter study abroad program in Cameroon-Ethiopia. Ayuk's lecture is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts. #BUSpeakerSeries

    History professor to appear on TLC

    TLC

    Jeanette Keith, professor of history, will appear on the Tuesday, Sept. 10, episode of TLC’s “Who Do You Think You Are” featuring Emmy-winning actor Jim Parsons of TV’s “The Big Bang Theory.” The documentary-style series pairs celebrities with history experts to discover their ancestral roots. Keith indicated she will appear on the show, which will air at 9 p.m., however she could not reveal more details.

    Cameroon Scholars Lecture Series

    Cameroon Scholars Lecture Series

    Two of the four visiting professors from the University of Buea in Cameroon will be presenting public lectures at 1 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 9, in McCormick Center 2303.

    • Martina Zinkeng, assistant professor of educational psychology, will present “Bilingual Instruction in Cameroon.”
    • Ekoka Molindo, assistant professor of educational leadership and vice dean,” will present “Multicultural Education in Cameroon.

    There will be a question and answer session immediately following the lectures. The event is sponsored by the College of Education.

    Phi Beta Lambda showcases talent over the summer

    Phi Beta Lambda

    This summer, Bloomsburg University’s business club, Phi Beta Lambda, sent several students to the National Leadership Conference in Anaheim, California. While there, Nicole Jubin, a Junior accounting major, was elected as Treasurer to the State Chapter. Carol Bachman '13, Business Education, placed third in Future Business Educator at States and seventh at the Nationals. John Katona '13, Accounting, placed second in Accounting for Professionals at States and went on to place seventh at Nationals.

    Also, Bloomsburg University’s chapter took two awards at Nationals as well. Phi Beta Lambda took ninth in the “Big Ten” National Chapter Membership Competition and also took an award for being the Second Largest Local Chapter in the Eastern Region of National Phi Beta Lambda. This was the second year for members of our club to receive awards at Nationals and the first year for our Chapter to receive awards. #GetInvolved

    Husky Unleashed: Yes, you could move like Usher!

    Christina Davis

    Continuing to unleash my inner husky I decided to create open hip hop dance classes for students at Bloomsburg University every Friday. After my experience over the years in amazing organizations such as the dance ensemble, vice versa, and the dance minor I am excited to work with more Bloomsburg peers!

    I visited Los Angeles over the summer where I took celebrity choreographer classes that have worked with artist such as, Usher, T pain, Black eyed Peas, and Jason Derulo. As well as TV shows Shake it up Chicago, Glee, ABDC etc. inspired by the things I have learned and the feed back choreographers such as Laurie Anne Gibson gave me I would love to pass my knowledge and techniques to others. My dance classes are open to anyone who wants to dance, love to dance, or just want to have a good workout. “I know as college student sometimes you don’t have the time to be dedicated to an organization” so this is open for students to come when ever they want on a Friday.

    F.O.C.U.S. returns for first fall semester church visitation

    Bethel Deliverance International

    Get off to a God start this semester as BU’s Office of Minority Affairs hosts Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Sept. 8, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Free breakfast at 10:30 a.m. Campus shuttle available for upper campus residents. Come be part of the service. Contact Marcei Woods at (570) 389-4091 for more information.

    BU upgrades campus heat and power system

    Commonwealth Financing Authority

    The Commonwealth Financing Authority has approved a $2 million grant for Bloomsburg University for the purchase and installation of a combined heat and power system. The Authority approved the grant under the Alternative and Clean Energy program, according to state Sen. John R. Gordner (R-27) and Rep. David Millard (R-109). The University will provide the remainder of the funding for the $10 million project.

    “The University plans to install a gas boiler system and turbine generator, which will enable it to eliminate all coal fuel use and reduce energy consumption by 2.5%,” said Senator Gordner. The reduction in energy consumption will reduce the University’s reliance on the local electrical substation and will enable the University campus to serve as a shelter for the local community in the event of a regional power outage, such as occurred during the September 2011 flood.

    “Bloomsburg University’s existing coal boilers are old and in poor condition, and have been in the process of being phased out over recent years,” said Rep. Millard. Two years ago, the University began utilizing a biomass boiler system to reduce its energy footprint.

    The Commonwealth Financing Authority (CFA) was established as an independent agency of the commonwealth to administer Pennsylvania's economic stimulus packages. The CFA holds fiduciary responsibility over the funding of programs and investments in Pennsylvania's economic growth. The Alternative and Clean Energy Program provides financial assistance in the form of grant and loan funds to be used by for the utilization, development and construction of alternative and clean energy projects in the state.

    Campus Alert: Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013

    Update 5:30 p.m.: Upon further investigation it was determined that the reported assault in the area of Kehr Union did not occur.

    In a report today (Sept. 12) to Bloomsburg University Police, a female reported a sexual assault by two unknown males between 2 and 3 a.m. Friday, Sept. 6, in the area of the Kehr Union Patio. Anyone with information is asked to contact BUPD at (570) 389-4168. Always be vigilant of your surroundings and do not walk alone. If you feel threatened or uncomfortable about a situation do not hesitate to notify police. The university recommends students walk in groups and keep a cell phone readily accessible.

    Also, consider carrying a whistle. While there are limitations to the effectiveness of a whistle against all threats, it could work well in a difficult situation as students would first blow into the whistle to attract help and then use a cell phone to call for help. For your safety, there are emergency call boxes available throughout campus. If you are in town and need help call 911. This campus alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990.

    Welcome back Huskies!

    Convocation

    "I am pleased to welcome you back for 2013-14, a year I am certain will be productive for each of us at Bloomsburg University. As we begin a new academic year together, I thank you for your contributions to our safe and welcoming campus, your dedication to educational excellence, your continued support of student success and your ongoing commitment to an atmosphere where diverse ideas are exchanged, valued and respected.

    I look forward to more initiatives in the year ahead, brought to life through the collaboration and teamwork which characterize Bloomsburg University. Please accept my sincere thanks for all that you do and my best wishes for a productive and fulfilling year ahead."

      — David L. Soltz, President

    Youngsters explore the creativity of math

    Summer Math Camp

    More than 30 elementary students in kindergarten through second grade recently explored math through art, physical activity and music as part of BU’s annual Math Camp, which also helped participating education majors learn fundamental themes for math learners. It’s a collaborative benefit, according to Frank D’Angelo, assistant professor of early childhood and adolescent education, who says through the math camp BU’s education program is helping local elementary students get ready for the upcoming school year. Nothing can simulate the actual classroom experience as effectively as working with youngster, D’Angelo says. #CollaborativeLearning

    Soaking in the Far East exposure

    Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania's China Study Abroad Program

    They hiked 6,000 mountain steps, witnessed an acrobatic kung fu show and visited the birthplace and burial site of Confucius … all in one week. Several other adventures and once-in-a-lifetime learning experiences have ensued since late June.

    Ten students from varying majors and a recent alumna are nearing the conclusion of their month-long journey to China, where they have been immersed in the Far East culture while visiting majestic, historical sites and studying at the prestigious Peking University. During their time in Beijing, the China Summer Study Abroad students are earning seven credits in collaboration with the Institute of Chinese as Second Language of Peking University. The program includes intensive training in Mandarin, cultural studies of China’s economic reform and modern day life in the capital city. #HuskySummer

    Ready to take your talents to the airways?

    WBUQ 91.1 FM

    WBUQ, a student-run radio station that broadcasts on FM 91.1 from the McCormick Center, is searching for students interested in staff positions, including on-air disc jockey and sound engineers. There are show openings for a variety of music and radio entertainment interests. WBUQ gives students an opportunity to work hands-on with new digital broadcasting equipment.

    WBUQ is a 600 watt non-commercial, educational radio station operating with a signal radius of 25 to 30 miles. The station underwent renovations this summer, which includes the capability of now live streaming online. WBUQ is a means of entertainment and information for the student body and community, to serve the public interest, and is an instrument of expression for student, faculty and community opinion, in accordance with the rules of the FCC.

    Open positions
    • Program Director: Creates a schedule of programs which is consistent with the philosophy of an independent college radio station.
    • News Director: Responsible for all outside news sources and answers to the program director for content originating from his/her department. The primary focus of the news should be BU related.
    • Music Director(s): Each music director is responsible for the on-air conduct of the DJs from their respective genre of music (one for rock, one for hip hop, one for classic rock, one for alternative, one for country etc.)
    • Production Director: Responsible for all activities that take place in the production room. Creates PSAs, promotional announcements, and station ID materials. Maintain the sound effects library. Assure logs are properly filed and filled out.
    • Public Affairs/Marketing Director: In charge of advertising, promotional items, fundraising, and prepares the schedule of events. Aids in the coordination of any concerts. Business Director: Maintains records of WBUQs finances. Aids general manager in budget requests. Fills out requests for purchases and deposits.

    Contact Mike Rosten, general manager, at mrr69646@huskies.bloomu.edu for more information.

    TALE's New Faculty Institute

    TALE Faculty Institute

    BU's New Faculty Institute was sponsored by TALE (Teaching and Learning Enhancement). The institute was a four-day workshop about effective teaching practices. Faculty learned about BU student demographics, syllabi design and content, general education, BOLT basics, bringing diversity to the classroom, and a variety of teaching techniques.

    Current BU faculty were actively engaged in sharing their expertise in the workshops and during the Teaching Exchange, a poster session where multiple teaching strategies were shared.

    'Bloomsburg 10' represent positive goal

    Bloomsburg 10 The Philadelphia Education Fund proudly celebrates the success of the 10 Kensington CAPA students featured in the Daily News on June 18, who will attend Bloomsburg University in the fall. To us, these graduating seniors have come to be known as the "Bloomsburg 10." Like many of their peers across the city, they overcame countless hurdles to get to where they are this week: a diploma in one hand and a college acceptance letter in the other. These students arrived at this point because they worked hard and set high expectations for themselves with the support of a community that rallied around them with the right services and supports at the right time. Too often, this is not the case. Well-meaning programs often fail to coordinate their work to meet the needs of students.

    Alumnus takes charge of PA prison system reform

    John Wetzel Considered one of Governor Tom Corbett’s most dynamic cabinet members, this Husky is spearheading the effort to streamline Pennsylvania’s $1.8 billion prison system that houses more than 51,000 inmates — the sixth-largest in the nation. Part of the job, according to John Wetzel '98, is to change the fundamental approach to corrections. “Would you rather spend money on corrections or treatment?” according to Wetzel, who during his tenure as warden in Chambersburg implemented a number of innovative efforts were instituted such as a day reporting center, the use of peer specialists and a jail diversion program. "I'm interested in developing leaders, and I demand results," he said in an interview with philly.com. "No one wants to brag about a 40 percent recidivism rate."

    Diversity and Inclusion Center established

    Diversity and Inclusion Center

    Three campus entities that serve underrepresented populations are now united as part of BU’s Diversity and Inclusion Center. The center includes Multicultural Affairs, the Women’s Resource Center and LGBTQA Student Services.

    “Through cross-cultural programming and opportunities for social interaction, we hope to enhance student learning and personal development, in addition to creating an environment that is supportive and welcoming to all students,” Donald Young said. “These are all parts of the same program. The center is built on understanding and respecting differences and similarities.”

    Key to the Diversity and Inclusion Center’s success is leadership of the three units. Matthew Barcus became BU’s first coordinator of LGBTQA Student Services Aug. 1. He earned a master’s degree from the University of South Dakota, where he was a graduate assistant in the Office of Diversity, and a bachelor’s degree from Briar Cliff University, Sioux City, Iowa.

    Young said a search is underway for a coordinator of the Women’s Resource Center with hopes of filling the position this fall. Madelyn Rodriguez continues to serve as director of Multicultural Affairs. The Diversity and Inclusion Center is part of BU’s Dean of Students Office, now located in the lower level of Kehr Union 101.

    Florida higher education leader selected as next PASSHE chancellor

    Frank T. Brogan

    The Board of Governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education has selected Frank T. Brogan, chancellor of the State University System of Florida, to serve as PASSHE’s next chancellor. He will assume the position on Oct. 1. The selection of Brogan to serve as the fourth chancellor in PASSHE’s nearly 31-year history comes at the conclusion of a six-month-long search that attracted interest from several hundred potential candidates.

    “We were humbled with the level of interest in the chancellor’s position,” said Board of Governors Chairman Guido M. Pichini, who chaired the search committee. “We received several hundred inquiries from individuals throughout the United States and even some from outside the country. It demonstrates the high regard with which our system is held.”

    The chancellor search focused on recruiting an “experienced leader who, from day one, can guide the System through the rapidly changing higher education landscape,” Pichini said. “We were looking for a strong administrator and a transformational leader who will collaborate with traditional and non-traditional stakeholders representing divergent views on what is best for our students and their families.

    Prior to serving as chancellor of Florida’s 335,000-student public university system, Brogan was president of Florida Atlantic University, lieutenant governor of Florida and Florida’s Commissioner of Education.

    “I am excited to join PASSHE in its commitment to provide high-quality, affordable higher educational opportunities for Pennsylvania’s families. Balancing quality and accessibility has been my top priority in Florida and should be the mission of every good public university,” said Brogan.

    Taking big steps to explore a small world

    Nanotechnology Exploration Camp

    BU’s Nanotechnology Exploration Camp, hosted by the College of Science and Technology, featured eight high school students spending a week (July 22 to 26) learning about nanotechnology — the manipulation of matter on an atomic and molecular scale.

    The students studied nanotechnology through hands-on experimentation and model building in the chemistry lab. Some of the labs included rock crystals being formed, nanobugs being built and a group brainstorming session being held on how to remove harmful gases from the atmosphere.

    There are multiple majors that could lead to a career working with nanotechnology such as physics and engineering. At the end of the week Peter Stine, professor and chair of the Department of Physics and Engineering Technology, gave the students an in-depth look at what it takes to become a physics or engineering major with a tour of the physics and engineering labs.

    PPL renews support of Celebrity Artist Series

    Celebrity Artist Series

    Teri MacBride, PPL Regional Affairs Director, presents a check to Bloomsburg University President David Soltz for PPL’s support of the Celebrity Artist Series for the upcoming 2013-14 season. Also representing PPL, one of the original sponsors of the series now in its 28th year, is Meg Welker, Manager for Education and Public Outreach. Soltz is joined by Jim Hollister, university assistant vice president for external relations.

    BU’s Celebrity Artist Series celebrated its 27th season this past season featuring a Broadway comedy, Grammy Award winning music and renowned high energy dance, along with a distinguished circus troupe, award winning folk duo and a quirky Vaudeville-inspired show.

    Campus Alert: Saturday, Aug. 31

    An armed robbery occurred at 5:15 a.m. today (Aug. 31) at Mount Olympus Apartments. Three black males, all wearing black clothing, knocked on an apartment door and were admitted by the residents. They took wallets and cell phones and fled.

    Suspects described as:

    • A light-skinned black male with a goatee, 5'7" 170lbs, age late teens to early 20s, wearing tan camo cargo shorts
    • A dark-skinned black male with a long beard 6'2"-6'3" 180 lbs., age late teens to early 20s, wearing an Adidas hoodie and armed with a handgun
    • Black male, brown skin 5'8" 180lbs, age late teens to early 20s

    Anyone with information should call BUPD at (570) 389-4168.

    Always be vigilant of your surroundings, do not walk alone and be careful about whom you allow into your residence. If you feel threatened or uncomfortable about a situation, do not hesitate to notify police. The university recommends students walk in groups and keep a cell phone readily accessible. This campus alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990.

    TRiO "Bounders" walk the walk, with chalk

    Allentown Partnership

    A little beautification of Berwick was recently provided by BU’s TRiO Upward Bound summer academy students, who spent an afternoon decorating Canal Street Bridge with chalk art. The project, TRiO Upward Bound’s seventh annual Service Day, is one of many activities and programs designed to help high school students explore their potential for academic, social and personal growth. #SenseOfCommunity

    STEM program targets local high achievers

    STEM Magnet

    BU recently welcomed a group of top high school sophomores from Bloomsburg, Central Columbia and Berwick Area school districts to campus for their first taste of its Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Magnet program. Eighteen academically talented students were admitted for the program’s first year.

    Students in the STEM Magnet program have enrolled together in five courses — two each during fall 2013 and spring 2014 and one during January 2014 — and earn a total of 15 credits. They will earn 15 additional credits during their second year. This summer the students are going through a short orientation, meeting some of the faculty, talking with a few college mentors and getting to know each other better through a series of Quest team-building exercises. The STEM program heads to the classroom and lab this fall. #SenseOfCommunity

    Partnering with a promising future

    Allentown Partnership

    A group of rising high school juniors from the Allentown School District are entering the final week of a busy three-week residential experience at Bloomsburg University, where they not only took classes but participated in several activities preparing them for the college experience.

    As part of the Allentown Partnership, a group of BU students served as counselors. They were responsible for fostering a healthy environment for the Allentown students and led programs that addressed basic health and safety skills, university services and personal growth. The partnership curriculum blended activities, workshops and experiential learning programs to excite and prepare the high school juniors for college. #SenseOfCommunity

    Alumnus hailed a hero

    Pocono Record

    Police hailed as heroes two men who helped subdue a gunman who opened fire at a Ross Township municipal meeting Monday night (Aug. 5). And one of which is a Bloomsburg University alumnus.

    "The individuals who are truly heroic in their actions have undoubtedly saved the lives of the individuals who were in attendance at the township meeting (Monday) night are Bernie Kozen and Mark Kresh," state police Capt. Edward C. Hoke said. Kresh helped Kozen (Class of 1979 and Beta Sigma Delta member) after he tackled accused gunman Rockne Newell to the floor. Police said Newell was firing rounds from a handgun as Kresh threw himself into the fracas.

    A touch of Bloomsburg in Buea

    University of Buea

    The Vice Chancellor of the University of Buea, UB, Nalova Lyonga is delighted about the partnership between UB and Bloomsburg University. On the ground in UB, are some twenty students and three teaching staff from BU. According to the UB VC, the regular visits and exchange programs they are having from BU is an indication of the special collaboration both universities have.

    “UB and BU have established a family relationship. We’re fascinated by the themes BU has been employing for the workshops and exchange programs. It has been a huge learning opportunity for our students and teaching staff,” Nalova said.

    Nalova invited the management of BU to continue being with them so that together they can build on that special relationship. “There is a lot of brain in BU that we in UB must tap from the regular visits. We’ve our limitations to also visit BU regularly but from the good example shown by my predecessor, Prof. Vincent Titanji, we will continue making efforts to get more of our lecturers and students visit BU."

    Keller to lead Career Development

    Chris Keller

    Chris Keller, Bloomsburg University’s longtime director of Admissions, will become the new director of Career Development in late July. “This position is pivotal to the long-term success of our students,” said Dione Somerville, vice president for Student Affairs. “The director provides overall leadership and strategic vision for career development activities, and is responsible for the overall function and operations of the Career Development Center.”

    Keller, BU’s admissions director for 18 years, has been an adjunct faculty member at Luzerne County Community College since 1998. Before coming to BU, he was director of admissions at Wingate (N.C.) University, director of communications for Erie County (N.Y.) Legislature, District 14, and a media communications faculty member at Medaille College, Buffalo, N.Y. A Navy veteran, Keller earned a bachelor’s degree from Medaille College and a master’s degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

    Chris Lapos

    Chris Lapos will serve as interim director of Admissions until a national search is completed for Keller’s replacement. Currently Admissions’ associate director for technical support, Lapos came to BU as Latino student recruiter in 2001 and also served as transfer coordinator and functional lead for ISIS implementation. Earlier in his career, Lapos worked in Admissions at Northern Illinois University and served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Bolivia. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Pittsburgh and a master’s from Ohio University. Keller fills a vacancy created by the retirement of former director Carol Barnett.

    Keeping your career focus sharp, even over summer

    Career Development Center

    BU’s Career Development Center welcomes all students to utilize its services this summer. A graduate assistant or an upperclassmen Career Pilot student will be happy to assist you with your resume and cover letter. Helpful information and examples may be found in our online Job Search Guide at bloomu.edu/careers. To get the most out of this service, we recommend calling 570-389-4070 to schedule an appointment. Not possible? Send your resume or cover letter to bloomUCareers@gmail.com. Job postings and career related content may be found on Focus.

    Graduate assistant earns statewide VFW award

    Robert Heckrote Robert Heckrote, a graduate assistant at BU’s Academic Advisement Center, was recently awarded the VFW Eagle Award in recognition for his extraordinary service as a Pennsylvania veteran while deployed overseas. Among those in attendance at the Lancaster Host Resort and Conference Center were several high-ranking veterans and Governor Tom Corbett. The VFW traces its roots back to 1899 when veterans of the Spanish-American War (1898) and the Philippine Insurrection (1899-1902) founded local organizations to secure rights and benefits for their service. Many arrived home wounded or sick. There was no medical care or veterans' pension for them, and they were left to care for themselves. Annually, the 1.9 million members of the VFW and its Auxiliary contribute more than 8.6 million hours of volunteerism in the community, including participation in Make A Difference Day and National Volunteer Week. From providing over $3 million in college scholarships and savings bonds to students every year, to encouraging elevation of the Department of Veterans Affairs to the president's cabinet, the VFW is there. #SenseOfCommunity

    PASSHE Board of Governors approves 2013-14 tuition rates

    The Board of Governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education has approved a $194 tuition increase for the 2013-14 academic year – $97 per semester – virtually ensuring PASSHE will remain the lowest-cost option among all four-year colleges and universities in the Commonwealth. The 3 percent increase also means the total cost of attendance at a PASSHE university – including tuition, fees, room and board – likely will remain below the national average among all public colleges and universities in the United States, and significantly below the average in the Middle States region, which comprises Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C. The new annual tuition rate for full-time, resident undergraduate students attending any of the 14 PASSHE universities beginning this fall will be $3,311 per semester, or $6,622 for the full academic year. Nearly 90 percent of PASSHE students are Pennsylvania residents and about 85 percent attend full time.

    PASSHE will receive $412.8 million in state funding this year, the same amount it received in 2012-13. That will cover about one-fourth of the operating costs of the 14 PASSHE universities. The Board also approved new tuition rates for resident graduate students and all nonresident students at its meeting today. The resident graduate tuition rate in 2013-14 will be $442 per credit, an increase of $13. Nonresident graduate tuition will increase by $19 per credit to $663. Full-time, undergraduate tuition for nonresident students will range from $9,934 to $16,556, depending on a variety of factors, including the university and program in which a student enrolls. All of the increases average approximately 3 percent.

    PASSHE Board of Governors approves 2013-14 tuition rates

    Get Connected with PASSHE

    The Board of Governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education has approved a $194 tuition increase for the 2013-14 academic year – $97 per semester – virtually ensuring PASSHE will remain the lowest-cost option among all four-year colleges and universities in the Commonwealth. The 3 percent increase also means the total cost of attendance at a PASSHE university – including tuition, fees, room and board – likely will remain below the national average among all public colleges and universities in the United States, and significantly below the average in the Middle States region, which comprises Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C. The new annual tuition rate for full-time, resident undergraduate students attending any of the 14 PASSHE universities beginning this fall will be $3,311 per semester, or $6,622 for the full academic year. Nearly 90 percent of PASSHE students are Pennsylvania residents and about 85 percent attend full time.

    PASSHE will receive $412.8 million in state funding this year, the same amount it received in 2012-13. That will cover about one-fourth of the operating costs of the 14 PASSHE universities. The Board also approved new tuition rates for resident graduate students and all nonresident students at its meeting today. The resident graduate tuition rate in 2013-14 will be $442 per credit, an increase of $13. Nonresident graduate tuition will increase by $19 per credit to $663. Full-time, undergraduate tuition for nonresident students will range from $9,934 to $16,556, depending on a variety of factors, including the university and program in which a student enrolls. All of the increases average approximately 3 percent.

    Future teachers help with community strategy

    A group of education majors recently completed a two-week practicum with three elementary schools in the Milton Area School District, capped by a Family Summer Kickoff where students designed a program to help parents and their children learn ways to sharpen and reinforce math and reading skills over the summer. Through the Milton Practicum, these BU students developed the knowledge, skills and dispositions needed to effectively work as a professional educator. In addition, the hands-on classroom experience gave the education majors a better understanding of the depth and breath of the teaching profession. A special initiative to the Milton Practicum was to support the school district's strategic goal in strengthening home, school and community relationships. Therefore Thomas Stramack, associate professor of education, and Michael Patte, professor of education, created this specific practicum to assist the district in meeting that goal. #CoCurricularLearning | #SenseOfCommunity | #HuskyUnleashed

    Connecting community to language learning

    World Languages and Cultures Camp Area children ages 6 to 13 are spending three weeks this summer on a virtual global journey with BU’s inaugural World Languages and Cultures Camp, which continues on campus through July 3. BU’s Department of Languages and Cultures is presenting weekly camps on Chinese, Spanish and Arabic where the children are learning some language basics and enjoying related cultural activities. #SenseOfCommunity Language camp Instructors are Jing Luo for Chinese, Nawal Bonomo for Arabic and Chris Donahue for Spanish. Student volunteers include Randi Dermo, Samantha Nowka, Mallie Culpepper, Joshua Powell, Corey Diehl and Monica Stypulkowski.

    Leaving their mark on the world

    Odyssey of the Mind BU’s Odyssey of the Mind program was recently recognized as one of the best in the world competing in the annual World Final for Odyssey of the Mind, held this year at Michigan State University. Odyssey of the Mind is an international program that provides creative problem-solving opportunities for students from kindergarten through college. Teams solve problems ranging from building mechanical devices to presenting their own interpretation of literary classics, bringing their solutions to local, state and world competitions. BU placed fifth out of 847 teams representing 23 countries. #CoCurricularLearning | #HuskyUnleashed

    Students explore renowned Reggio philosophy

    Reggio Practicum
    Recently, 19 students and two professors traveled to Reggio Emilia, Italy for a two-week intensive study abroad experience. The group was comprised of seventeen undergraduate and two graduate students, all teacher candidates in the Department of Early Childhood and Adolescent Education or the Department of Exceptionalities. The purpose of this experiential program was to learn about the Reggio Emilia approach, a world-renowned early childhood education philosophy, in its birthplace. Through observations and interactions with teachers and students within the Reggio schools, in conjunction with lectures led by master teachers, pedagosistas, and administrators at the Loris Malaguzzi International Center, everyone gained a better understanding of the Reggio approach and how it can positively impact their future Pre-K-grade 4 classrooms. This inquiry and arts-based approach to young children’s learning was perceived by all as conducive to cultivating competent learners and human beings who (re)think, collaborate, and create. Teacher candidates used the Reggio philosophy to strengthen understanding educators are a “compass for children” acting simultaneously as a guide, problem-poser, researcher, observer and documenter, all in pursuit of nurturing and visible learning. #CoCurricularLearning | #BUAbroad

    Loonan named VP for administration, finance

    John Loonan John Loonan, a senior administrator with experience in higher education, private industry and government, will join BU as vice president for administration and finance, effective July 29. Loonan will serve as the chief steward of BU’s physical and financial resources. He will be responsible for the budget office, finance and business services, procurement and operations, facilities management and planning, police and public safety, human resources and labor relations, financial aid and right-to-know. He also will oversee BU’s $196 million operating budget. In his current position at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE), University of Albany, State University of New York, Loonan fulfills several executive-level roles. These include vice president of finance and fiscal management for the college, president of Fuller Road Management Corp., research foundation operations manager for the CNSE campus, and treasurer of the U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium.

    Education majors get hands-on lesson

    2013 Urban Practicum Nearly 80 education majors got a hands-on lesson on teaching in a diverse classroom through BU’s annual Urban Practicum in Bethlehm and Easton, from May 19 to 31. Joining the students were Frank D'Angelo, Todd Hoover, Molly Marnella and Cherie Roberts, professors in the Department of Early Childhood and Adolescent Education. The practicum students were placed in kindergarten through eighth-grade classrooms across the Bethlehem and Easton area school districts in seven different area schools: March Elementary, Marvine Elementary, Paxinosa Elementary, Fountain Hill Elementary, Lincoln Elementary, Easton Area Middle School and Broughal Middle School. All of the students were placed with a cooperating teacher to gain a better understanding of the unique and often difficult situations urban schools and students face on a daily basis. After each day in the classroom, the practicum BU students heard presentations from superintendents and assistent superintendents of Easton and Bethlehem districts, elementary principals, and minority affairs leaders in the Lehigh Valley. #CollaborativeLearning | #SenseOfCommunity | #HuskyUnleashed

    F.O.C.U.S. returns for summer on-campus church visitation

    Bethel Deliverance International BU’s Office of Minority Affairs is hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, July 14, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Free breakfast at 10:30 a.m. Come be part of the service. If you would like to take part in the program, contact Marcei Woods at (570) 389-4091 for more information.

    BU among schools to attend AAC&U institutes

    AAC&U Summer Institute A team of six of BU faculty and administrative leaders participated in the AAC&U Summer Institute on General Education and Assessment in Vermont, from June 1 to 5, collaboratively working on redesigning and development of assessment plans for general education programs along with incorporating important trends, research and best practices with resident faculty of educational experts. Representing BU were:
    • Patricia J. Beyer, team leader, associate professor of environmental, geographical and geological sciences, chair of the General Education Council and former member of General Education Task Force
    • Christopher Donahue, associate professor of languages and cultures, member of General Education Council and former member of General Education Task Force
    • Sheila Dove Jones, director of the Office of Planning and Assessment and member of General Education Council
    • Gretchen Osterman, assistant Dean of Students and director of the Office of Greek Affairs and member of General Education Council
    • Ted Roggenbuck, assistant professor of English and director of University Writing Center
    • Mark Usry, associate professor of business education and information technology management and member of General Education Council.

    Overall, 122 campuses were selected to attend AAC&U summer institutes on General Education and Assessment; High-Impact Practices and Student Success; and Integrative Learning and the Departments. For 23 years, AAC&U’s Institute on General Education and Assessment has provided campus teams with opportunities to refine and advance general education programs and their assessment. The Institute focuses on building a campus culture for intentional, well-defined, and meaningfully assessed general education curricula designed for an increasingly diverse student body. As a special feature of this year's institute and in partnership with Excelencia! in Education, of the 41 participating institutions, five Hispanic-serving institutions will focus during their time at the institute on how to embed, scale, and assess high-impact educational practices specifically designed to advance Latino student success in general education. #AcademicExcellence

    Congratulations Class of 2013!

    Nearly 1,300 Bloomsburg University seniors received bachelor’s degrees Saturday, May 18, during commencement ceremonies on the BU Academic Quadrangle. BU held two commencement ceremonies for undergraduates on May 18. Students from the Colleges of Education and Liberal Arts graduate in the morning; while students from the Colleges of Business and Science and Technology will receive their degrees in the afternoon. Students who earned the highest grade point averages in each college, known as top honor graduates, were recognized during the commencement ceremonies. The graduates, their hometowns and majors:
    • College of Liberal Arts and College of Business — Sarah E. Geise, Northumberland, double major in economics and business administration/management.
    • College of Education — Justin E. Drumm, Bloomsburg, education/early childhood.
    • College of Science and Technology — Dagaen Garrett Brady Golomb, Bloomsburg, double major in computer science and mathematics; and Caitlin Green, Factoryville, speech pathology and audiology.

    Six doctorates and 207 master’s degrees were conferred during graduate commencement Friday, May 17, in Haas Center for the Arts. #BUClass2013

    As one chapter ends, another one begins

    "As slowly as spring arrived this year, it didn’t appear to impact the speed of the semester. In fact, it seems like only yesterday I was welcoming you back to campus for the start of the 2012-13 academic year — the final year at Bloomsburg for more than 1,300 of you. I even remember welcoming you to the university as wide-eyed freshmen in August 2009. I was beginning my second full year as president, and you were getting your first taste of independence," — an excerpt from President David L. Soltz's latest blog.

    Unleash your Inner Husky with inspiration

    “It was the immediate sense of community I felt when it started my freshman year that made me know from day one I was going to love it here,” — Tom Kelly, president of #BUClass2013. “There’s just something that occurs and changes in every single person the day they take their first step on this campus as students. You immediately become a part of something so much bigger than yourself.” We are Huskies. We believe in working hard to make our dreams become a reality. At Bloomsburg University, being a Husky is about striving to be the best ... in the classroom, in your community and in your career. And each experience contributes to our learning and community involvement. With more than 50 undergraduate degrees, BU is putting success within the reach of more than 10,000 students.

    Duo embarks on global learning journey

    GASI Conference
    A.S.M. Tuhin, a junior finance, economics and political science major, and Evan Wright, a junior cultural anthropology major, are about to see in-person their individual undergraduate research reach a global audience at the 22nd annual Global Awareness Society International Conference in Rome, Italy. The conference will be held Saturday, May 25, through Friday, May 31, focusing on the challenges and opportunities of the Global Financial Crisis. The students will also enjoy the benefits of networking with many of the world’s leading scholars dedicated to peace, harmony, and cooperation among diverse peoples. Tuhin and Wright will also participate in several of the GASI Conference events, which will include topics covering international tax policy strategies, development of infant education and the future of national identity.
    • Tuhin will present, “Impact of Global Education on Bloomsburg University Students and the Necessity of Institutionalized Diversity Programs for Academic Advisement.”
    • Wright will present, “A Global Perspective on Gay Rights.”

    Tuhin and Wright are both recipients of The Dr. and Mrs. Chang S. Roh Global Awareness Scholarship. Follow their global journey as it happens next week, as well as interact with these two Huskies through their daily blog! ... #BUAbroad #CoCurricularLearning

    National Science Foundation funds honeybee research

    John Hranitz

    John Hranitz, biology professor and director of the Office of Undergraduate Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity, received a National Science Foundation grant of $316,000 to study the integrative biology of bees during summer 2013. Hranitz is partnering with the University of Central Oklahoma to study the behavior of honeybees and solitary bees in natural pollination systems and their responses to environmental stressors.

    Researchers on the eight-week project in Turkey and Greece will include faculty from six universities in three countries, as well as student researchers.

    It's never too late to fall in love ... again

    Love in Bloom Again is the sequel to last year's popular series of short films about relationships among college students. This unique compilation of shorts is filmed, directed, and edited by BU students Chad VanHorn, Lillian Tyrrell, Anthony Drain, and Matt Caraballo, and produced by Michael DiGiorgio, of Instructional Media Services. Love in Bloom Again features more than 40 BU students as actors in the film. Join the cast and crew this Thursday at 9:30 p.m. in Carver Hall's Gross Auditorium for a free screening. Love in Bloom Again is approximately one hour.

    COST research and scholarship hit center stage

    COST Research
    COST Research Students from various disciplines ranging from speech pathology to computer science to nursing and instructional technology will present their research projects and findings on Saturday, May 11, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. during College of Science and Technology’s Research and Scholarship Day in Hartline Science Center. Undergraduate and graduate students will present either through an openly displayed poster session or a 15-minute presentation. Light refreshments will be served.

    Research: Providing Lasting Benefits

    "It’s a wonderful learning opportunity. Once you start collaborating, there’s a real creative process that takes place. Everybody benefits. Students learn, faculty learn and we’re all engaged in the same problem trying to solve it or trying to learn more,”

    COE receives NCATE accreditation

    College of Education BU's College of Education recently received a seven-year, full reaccreditation for the bachelor’s-level teacher preparation program and accreditation for the master’s degree program through theNational Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Approximately 1,600 students are enrolled in BU’s undergraduate programs in education; more than 400 are enrolled in graduate-level programs. In 2012, 307 students earned bachelor’s degrees in education and more than a third obtained teaching positions in this highly competitive field. School districts where recent graduates are teaching include Baltimore County, Dorchester County, Frederick County and Prince George’s County, Md.; Bering Strait and Fairbanks North Star, Alaska; Cartwright, Ariz.; Charlotte-Mecklenburg, N.C.; Edgecombe County, N.C.; King George Co., Va.; and Fulton County Ga.

    Students present Honors research projects

    Honors Research Honors students take two three-credit independent study courses where they work with a faculty mentor to complete a year-long research project. The final piece of their assessment is a 30-minute oral presentation along with a written research paper, which is open for submission for publication. Presentations will be held in the Honors classroom in Luzerne Hall, Room B-9. All are open to the campus community. Wednesday, May 1
    • 5 p.m. – Kiersten Pletscher, iPads and learning in Math Education with Raymond Pastore
    • 5:30 p.m. – Kenny Pallis, Mass- and shape- dependent acceleration in birds and a novel method to collect flight performance data in the field with Clay Corbin

    Friday, May 3

    • 2:30 p.m. – Robert Kusant, An Exploration of the Knowledge and Skills of Small Business Restaurant Owners, Within a College Town, to Prevent Fraud with Mark Law
    • 3 p.m. – Ryan Oravec, Finding Characterizations of Condorcet Voting Systems through Programming with Drue Coles
    • 3:30 p.m. – Natalie Wagner, How People’s Celebrations Reflect their Culture: A Study of the Milton Harvest Festival with Susan Dauria

    Thursday, May 9

    • 2:30 p.m. – Paul Gregorowicz, Parallel Programming with CUDA and Ant Colony Optimizations with Erik Wynters
    • 4:30 p.m. – George Specht, Utilizing Facebook in the Pennsylvania house of Representatives with Neil Strine IV

    Friday, May 10

    • 2 p.m. — Kelsey Matthews, Drug Resistance in Candida Glabrata
    • 2:30 p.m. – Amanda Sissock, The Effects of Yoga on the Vestibular System Measured by the Computerized Dynamic Posturography with Jorge Gonzalez
    • 3 p.m. – Heather Hamilton, Gender Differences and Variations of Sign Production by Users of American Sign Language with Jessica Bentley-Sassaman
    • 3:30 p.m. – Amber Shifflett, Female Lacrosse Players Reaction Times and Its Dependence on Physical Fitness with Cynthia Surmacz
    • 4 p.m. – Hanna Jarsocrak, The Effect of Musical Training on Literacy Skills with Jennifer Johnson

    Graduating art majors showcase final works

    Senior Exit Show BU’s graduating art studio and art history students’ exit show will open with a reception Wednesday, May 8, from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in Haas Gallery of Art. The exhibit will continue until Saturday, May 18, and will be open to the public free of charge Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from noon to 2 p.m. The exhibit will feature a variety of materials and mediums, including sculpture, photography, drawing, painting, installation, fabric design, mixed media and printmaking, according to gallery associate Rebecca Morgan. The opening reception will begin with presentations by art history seniors Holli Trivelpiece, Berwick; Disa Turner, Danville; Mei Yang and Shonda Cobb, both from Bloomsburg; Deanna Barnes, Royersford; Angie Musselman, Millville; and Jill A. Suda, Swoyersville. Topics include “Female Portraits of the Renaissance,” “Into the World of Hancock” and “Cake: Delectable Art,” according to Nogin Chung. associate professor of art history.

    Students win second place in Management competition

    Business Management A team of four BU students won second place in the Society for the Advancement of Management’s business case competition held this March in Arlington, Va. Shown from left are students Nathan Shefter, Andrew Foley, Kristin Hummel and Nicholas Bonitatibus with team adviser Lam Nguyen, associate professor of management, Joan Benek-Rivera, assistant dean of the College of Business, and John Okpara, chair of the department of management.

    Austin to receive Maroon and Gold Excellence Award

    Kristin Austin BU administrator Kristin Mock Austin '02 will be honored with a Maroon and Gold Excellence Award by the BU Alumni Association at the annual Alumni Awards Luncheon to be held on Saturday, June 1, as part of the Alumni Weekend 2013 celebration. The Maroon and Gold Excellence Award was established by the BU Alumni Association in 1985 to recognize alumni who have graduated within the past 15 years and demonstrate outstanding potential for further contributions to BU and professionally. Austin graduated from BU in 2002 with a bachelor’s degree in social work and is currently coordinator for New Student Orientation and assistant director of Admissions at Bloomsburg, where she recently filled an interim role as assistant director of Career Development. Austin has used her skills and training to work in a variety of fields, including religious, educational, non-profit and group home settings. She went on to earn her master’s degree in counseling with an emphasis in student affairs from Edinboro University. Since then she has been employed at several universities in positions focusing on the development of student leaders. She continues to contribute to her alma mater by serving as a committee member and presenter for the annual Husky Leadership Summit and as a member of the Multicultural Alumni Connections committee. She has also served as an alumni workshop presenter for the Ziegler Institute for Professional Development and with the Bloomsburg Board of Governor’s Scholars program and ACT 101/EOP program. #HuskyUnleashed

    Greeks made race day great

    MARC At 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 5, the Montour Area Recreation Commission (MARC) celebrated the successful completion of the sixth running of our River Towns Marathon and Half Marathon. We share that celebration with members of the Alpha Sigma Tau, Beta Sigma Delta, Delta Pi and Delta Epsilon Beta Greek organizations from Bloomsburg University. At this event, MARC worked with more than 50 Greek volunteers to organize and deliver an outstanding day of amateur athletic endurance running in Columbia and Montour counties. More than 500 people from 23 states and two Canadian provinces attended the event. Without exaggeration, MARC could not have successfully conducted this race without the support of BU’s Greek organizations. The River Towns Marathon IS NOT an easy event to produce. We relied heavily on the Greek volunteers to perform the following tasks:
    • Direct parking for racers, spectators and Spring Fling attendees (beginning at 5 on a Saturday morning)
    • Assist with food, hydration and other support of the nearly 500 runners, often in stressful situations and for as long as 10 hours in the sun
    • Assist with race registration, bag checks and security
    • Clean-up of trash and race supplies at the end of the event

    The work can be difficult, stressful and often thankless, but the BU Greek volunteers did what was asked of them and did so with enthusiasm. Many of our racers went out of their way to comment on how nice the Greek volunteers were and how dedicated our volunteers were to the event. In a time of rapidly decreasing volunteerism, the one local exception is the BU Greek life program. MARC (and our community) owes the Bloomsburg University Greek organizations a debt of gratitude for the good works they do to make the Columbia-Montour region a healthy place to live, work and play. #SenseOfCommunity #HuskyUnleashed

    • Bob Stoudt '95, MARC director, and Dave Decoteau '86, MARC events manager.

    Faculty earn tenure and promotions

    Carver Hall The following faculty members have been granted promotion effective Fall 2013: To full professor: Joseph Andreacci, Exercise Science and Athletics; Alan Baker, Music, Theatre and Dance; Toni Trumbo Bell, Chemistry and Biochemistry; Noreen Chikotas, Nursing; Laura Marini Davis, Business Law; Ghassan Ibrahim, Physics and Engineering Technology; Jonathan Ohn, Finance; Kurt Smith, Philosophy; Pamela Smith, Audiology and Speech Pathology; Luke Springman, Languages and Cultures; Ju Xin, Physics and Engineering Technology; Thomas Zalewski, Audiology and Speech Pathology; and Gregory Zimmerman, Chemistry and Biochemistry. To associate professor: Eric Affsprung, Academic Support and Advisement; Amy Covill, Psychology; Frank D’Angelo, Early Childhood and Adolescent Education; Peter Doerschler, Political Science; Naz Afarin Fallahian, Physics and Engineering Technology; Sheila Hartung, Nursing; Shane Jaynes, Sociology, Social Work and Criminal Justice; Jeffrey Leitzel, Psychology; Shell Lundahl, Academic Support and Advisement; Arian Khalehi Moghadam, Economics; Philip Osburn, Chemistry and Biochemistry; Tracey Schmidt-Jaynes, Music, Theatre and Dance; and Kathryn Yelinek, Library Services. Faculty who have been granted tenure effective Fall 2013: Eric Affsprung, Academic Support and Advisement; Peter Doerschler, Political Science; Naz Afarin Fallahian, Physics and Engineering Technology; Shane Jaynes, Sociology, Social Work and Criminal Justice; Nada Jevtic, Physics and Engineering Technology; Mark Law, Accounting; Mindi Miller, Nursing; Tracey Schmidt-Jaynes, Music, Theatre and Dance; Noah Wasielewski, Exercise Science and Athletics; and Qing Yue, Audiology and Speech Pathology.

    Education majors get hands-on lesson through Urban Practicum

    2013 Urban Practicum Nearly 80 education majors got a hands-on lesson on teaching in a diverse classroom through BU’s annual Urban Practicum in Bethlehm and Easton, from May 19 to 31. Joining the students were Frank D'Angelo, Todd Hoover, Molly Marnella and Cherie Roberts, professors in the Department of Early Childhood and Adolescent Education. The practicum students were placed in kindergarten through eighth-grade classrooms across the Bethlehem and Easton area school districts in seven different area schools: March Elementary, Marvine Elementary, Paxinosa Elementary, Fountain Hill Elementary, Lincoln Elementary, Easton Area Middle School and Broughal Middle School. All of the students were placed with a cooperating teacher to gain a better understanding of the unique and often difficult situations urban schools and students face on a daily basis. After each day in the classroom, the practicum BU students heard presentations from superintendents and assistent superintendents of Easton and Bethlehem districts, elementary principals, and minority affairs leaders in the Lehigh Valley. #CollaborativeLearning | #SenseOfCommunity | #HuskyUnleashed

    Faculty honored as TALE outstanding teachers

    Three faculty members will be recognized at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania’s spring commencement ceremonies on Friday and Saturday, May 17 and 18, as the Teaching and Learning Enhancement (TALE) Outstanding Teachers for 2012-13. Jennifer Johnson, assistant professor of psychology, and John Grandzol, professor of management, were selected by undergraduate students; Denise Davidson, assistant professor of school counseling and college student affairs, was chosen by graduate students. TALE Outstanding Teachers Davidson’s nomination and selection is the first for the new TALE graduate teaching award. Nominating students praised her “expectation of excellence.” Known as a “demanding professor,” she “challenges her students to learn the material and connect it with other classes and their chosen professions.” Johnson’s nominators said she “goes out of her way to ensure that each student in her class, whether in a mass lecture or 20-person seminar, understands and learns the material provided.” She encourages students to become “intrinsically motivated” rather than just memorizing facts, and requires students to “think critically and apply their work, while at the same time giving back to their community.” Students who nominated Grandzol called him an “outstanding teacher.” Students know that the “tools he is teaching them are what they will need when they begin a job.” He provides “learning experiences outside of the classroom to show how concepts are applied in the real world” and “piques interest in a topic.”

    Huskies Unleashed: A college degree and a military commission

    Army ROTC BU’s Army ROTC program recently commissioned four new officers at Bucknell University’s Rooke Chapel.
    • 2LT Steven Shorter was commissioned into the PAANG in the Adjutant General Corps
    • 2LT John Petty was commissioned in the Active Army Ordnance Corps with a follow on assignment to Ft Lewis, Wash.
    • 2LT Adam Wendoloski commissioned in the Active Army as a Military Intelligence officer detailed to the Infantry for his first assignment in Alaska
    • 2LT Robert Roche was commissioned into the PAANG as a Ordnance officer.

    Congratulations to them and their families on this great accomplishment. #HuskyUnleashed

    Four honored with Provost’s Award

    Provost's Award Four faculty members were honored last week with the Provost's Award for Excellence in Research and Scholarly Activity. Shown, from left, are Kuo-Hao Lee, finance; Todd Borlik, English; Jennifer Venditti-Roadarmel, biological and allied health sciences; Mark Bauman, educational studies and secondary education; Ira Blake, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. Each award winner received $1,000 for travel or other faculty development activities and a plaque. Nominations of untenured faculty are made by each dean and evaluated by Dean's Council based upon publications, presentations and other scholarly work.

    Act 101/EOP honors graduating seniors

    Act 101/EOP Awards BU's Act101/EOP recently honored graduating seniors at a banquet. Shown from left are:
    • Kirstin Selvey and Breanna Nicholson, Director’s Award Recipients
    • Irvin Wright, Acting Associate Dean for Academic Achievement and professor of Developmental Education
    • Jasmin Rockemore and Jasmin Rosario, Director’s Award Recipients
    • Luke Betley, Achievement and Leadership Award Recipient

    The Director’s Award is presented to graduating seniors of the program in recognition of their contributions to the university through student leadership and involvement. The Achievement and Leadership Award is presented to program seniors deserving special recognition. Act 101/EOP, coordinated through the Department of Developmental Instruction, provides support and opportunities for success to students traditionally under-represented in higher education.

    Sigma Pi Sigma inducts four new members

    Sigma Pi Sigma BU’s chapter of Sigma Pi Sigma, the official honor society of the physics profession, recently inducted Michael Ashton, Robert Gionfriddo, Kelly Barko and Mark Campbell as its newest members. Through election to Sigma Pi Sigma, distinctive achievement and high scholarship in physics is recognized and celebrated. Students elected to membership must attain high standards of general scholarship and outstanding achievement in physics. Undergraduate candidates must be in the upper one-third of their class in general scholarship to meet the minimum standard that chapters may use. Undergraduate candidates must have completed at least three semesters of full-time college work and at least three semester courses in physics that can be credited toward a physics major. Students who are not physics majors can be elected, provided that they meet the standards and have demonstrated an interest in physics. BU’s Department of Physics and Electronics Engineering is very pleased to congratulation the latest members of the Sigma Pi Sigma honor society.

    Chemistry students, faculty see research presented on national stage

    ACS Conference Eight BU chemistry majors and five faculty members presented their research recently at the 245th American Chemical Society National Meeting and Exposition in New Orleans. In additional to presenting research and attending other scholarly seminars, the students and faculty met BU alumnus Dr. Conrad Stanitski (’60) the recipient of the George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education, and attended Stanitski’s award acceptance speech. More than 15,000 chemists, academics, students and other professionals participated in the conference, addressing the relationship between chemistry and food in our society. Representing BU were Michael Pugh, Philip Osburn, Gene Tunney, Jessica Viscomi, Hannah Cronk, Christopher House, Jacob Powell, Toni Trumbo-Bell, Matthew

    APICS hosts “Best of Class” Networking Night

    APICSBU’s Association for Operations Management (APICS) Student Chapter recently hosted its first annual “Best of Class” night. The chapter welcomed student members, parents, and over 15 industry professionals and alumni, including representatives from NEPA APICS, Kydex, Autoneum, Merck, Lowes, and Geisinger Health Systems. These and other organizations were critical to the chapter chartering process and provided speakers and field trip experiences throughout the year. The event featured a light buffet and a short program consisting of John Grandzol recognizing students graduating with the Supply Chain Management (SCM) Career Concentration, award winners for the SCM case competition, and officers for the APICS student chapter. Christian Grandzol displayed a pictorial year in review. A special presentation by NEPA APICS was among the highlights of the evening. The professional chapter presented the student chapter with the chapter charter and a very generous check to seed the chapter’s educational events.

    PR students run successful $1,500 fundraising campaign

    Bocce Ballers Nearly 1,500 was raised this semester by Richard Ganahl's PR Cases and Problems class for the annual Bocce Bash, a Special Olympics event held each fall on campus with support from BU's Student Council for Exceptional Children and the Department of Exceptionality Programs. The senior-level mass communications class plans fundraisers for a chosen local charity each spring as its main project. Each level of the project, from selecting the charity to developing a plan to launching the actual fundraising campaign, is done by the students. Using the online funding platform, Indiegogo.com, the class conducted several fundraisers across campus and within the surrounding community. In addition, the class hosted a 17-team Bocce Bash tournament in April on the Academic Quad. Proceeds from the Bocce Bash fundraiser will benefit the Special Olympics of Columbia/Montour to purchase equipment and increase athlete participation in the event. #CollaborativeLearning

    Anthropology honors graduates, new Lambda Alpha members

    Lambda Alpha Inductees Along with celebrating student and faculty accomplishments over the past academic year, BU’s Department of Anthropology honored its 16 graduating seniors and celebrated the induction of 20 new members to the Lambda Alpha National Honor Society's Zeta Chapter of Pennsylvania. Graduating Seniors — Tristan Adrian, Sarah Blackwell, Sarah Gray, Frank Hickman, Elizabeth Kinder, Kayla Maciorkoski, Jimmy Muwombi, Samantha Nowka, Natalie Wagner, John Barrett, Janelle Derr, Shelly Fought, Kahlil Little, Krysta Shaffer, Katelyn McMichael and Kristin Stauffer. Lambda Alpha Inductees — Gabrielle A. Ferrara, Teresa M. Robbins, Rachel Lillian Harris, Andrew Ostrowsky, Matthew Vincent Kenny, Katelyn Shoemaker, Jared McAlexander, Amanda Shott, Emily R. Prisuta, Amber M. Weaver, Shayna Lee Stella, Tamara Sellers, Shannon Faye Sursely, Chelsea Meagan Myers, Gabrielle Vielhauer, Laurel K. Downs, Katrina S. Taylor, Michelle Mattar, Lindsay C. George and Gessica Barry.

    A WISE investment in women’s leadership

    The WISE women of BU The WISE women of BU (Women Inspiring Strength and Empowerment) raised $200 late this semester for the Breast Cancer Fund through the LUNAFEST, which was held on campus in April. LUNAFEST, the fundraising film festival dedicated to:
    • promoting awareness about women's issues
    • highlighting women filmmakers
    • bringing women together in their communities

    This unique film festival highlighted women as leaders in society, illustrated through nine short films by women filmmakers. The films range from animation to fictional drama, and cover topics such as women’s health, motherhood, body image, aging, cultural diversity and breaking barriers.

    PPL commits $26,500 to STEM Magnet program

    PPL Donation PPL has committed a total of $26,500 to date in support of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Magnet Program, which begins this fall at Bloomsburg University. PPL also advised on development of the curriculum and will assist in mentoring program participants, starting with 21 juniors from Berwick, Bloomsburg and Central Columbia high schools. Shown from left are BU President David L. Soltz; Teri MacBride, PPL regional affairs director; Michael Munroe, plant manager, PPL Montour; Jerome Dvorak, executive director, BU Foundation; Don Bernhard, PPL director of community affairs; Brian Case ’83, PPL manager of academic relations; Joe Scopelliti, community relations manager, PPL Susquehanna; Elizabeth Mauch, dean of the College of Education, BU; and Jim Hollister, assistant vice president for External Relations, BU.

    Registration open for on-campus mass media camp

    Technology and Mass Media Camp BU’s mass communications faculty will offer a week-long Technology and Mass Media Camp for high school juniors and seniors from Monday to Friday, June 24 to 28. Classes and workshops will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day in McCormick Center. The cost is $45 per student. Students will be introduced to the expanding field of mass communications and how the mass media operate. During the workshop, students will produce web- and broadcast-quality projects using equipment and software in the mass communication television studio, control room, edit bays and multimedia computer lab. David Magolis and Jason Genovese, BU assistant professors of mass communications, will host the camp. The registration deadline is June 1. For additional information, contact Magolis at dmagolis@bloomu.edu.

    Lambda Pi Eta honors new members

    Lambda Pi Eta Lambda Pi Eta, the official honor society for communication studies, celebrated the induction Sunday, April 28, of their newest members. Lambda Pi Eta recognizes, fosters and rewards outstanding achievement in communication studies. In order to be eligible for membership, students must:
    • complete 60 semester credit hours
    • have a cumulative GPA of 3.0
    • complete 12 credit hours within the department
    • have a minimum GPA of 3.25 for department courses
    • be enrolled as a student in good standing, as determined by BU policies
    • rank within the top 35 percent of one’s class in general scholarship

    Lambda Pi Eta members promote outstanding academic achievement in the communication discipline. Congratulations to the newest members of BU's chapter of Lambda Pi Eta! Inductees were Whitney Barksdale, Lauren Coffey, Nate Friesema, Abigail Morrison, Brianna Olsson, Colby Little, Michaela Reilly and Lindsay Romanelli.

    Meet the inaugural Gloria Cohen-Dion award winner

    Cohen-Dion Leadership AwardThe Gloria Cohen-Dion award was created this year to honor the memory of Gloria Cohen-Dion, who suddenly passed away in February after 20 years of service as a professor at Bloomsburg University. The Gloria Cohen-Dion Leadership Award will be given to the graduating political science major who has provided the most service through leadership to the Department of Political Science. This student achievement award is given to a political science major who has exhibited outstanding leadership qualities during their tenure in the department. BU’s political science faculty unanimously selected Matthew Coombe to receive this award, which includes a cash gift.

    Model UN connects with future global leaders

    Model UN More than 100 high school students representing four area school districts participated in BU’s annual Model United Nations High School Simulation on Thursday, April 11, sponsored by the SOLVE office and directed by BU’s Model United Nation Club. At the conference, the high school students represented the General Assembly I, General Assembly III, Security Council, and the World Health Organization. The high school students came prepared to discuss the topics for each of their respective committees and acted as different countries. The Bloomsburg Model U.N. members provided their knowledge of the correct chairing process used by the United Nations. As usual, the students were very involved with the whole conference and eager to learn, they even taught some of the college students a few new pointers. Overall, the High School Conference was a productive one and we are excited to host next year’s High School conference. First Row (L-R): LaDeshia Maxwell, Kelly Murray, Jaimie Hoffman, James Haywood, Jessica White, Kenny Gillis and Dave Yael. Second Row (L-R): Ace Ahmed, Haleigh McDonald, Eric Petrozino, Abdullah Al-Bahrani, Harold Alfred, A.S.M. Tuhin and Matt Albertson.

    Gender Studies honors graduates, essay winner

    Gender Studies BU’s Gender Studies Minor (GSM) held its Spring 2013 Graduation Reception on Friday, April 26. This semester, ten students are graduating with a minor in Gender Studies. The students graduating with the minor were given green graduation cords. Hannah Long Also at the reception, the winner of the 2012-2013 GSM Essay Competition was announced. This year's winner is the graduating student, Hannah Long, double-majoring in communication studies and psychology and double-minoring in Gender Studies and Philosophy. Her essay title is "What's the Buzz About? Reclaiming Female Sexuality through the Vibrator." As a prize, Hannah Long received Cheryl Strayed's national best-seller novel, Wild. Her essay investigates the liberating function of the vibrator for women. Initially developed as a treatment for the condition of hysteria, the vibrator has changed the way that women’s pleasure is viewed and achieved. Because of this liberating aspect, the vibrator serves as a device for sexual freedom as well as a call for discussions on social and ideological realms of female sexuality.

    Rotary students unleash their Inner Husky

    RotaryBU students are shown at the Rotary District Conference in Gettysburg this past weekend. The seven students are members of the BU student Rotaract Club that is affiliated with the Bloomsburg Rotary Club. These students have worked side-by-side Bloomsburg Rotarians to serve meals at the Community Meals served at the Wesley United Methodist Church on a monthly basis. What would it take to change the world? Rotary's 1.2 million members believe it starts with a commitment to Service Above Self. In more than 34,000 clubs worldwide, you'll find members volunteering in communities at home and abroad to support education and job training, provide clean water, combat hunger, improve health and sanitation, and eradicate polio.

    Biology students earn big awards at annual state meeting

    CPUB Winners The annual Commonwealth of Pennsylvania University Biologists (CPUB) Meeting was recently held at Clarion University. While BU’s biology department only had a few students attend the meeting, the two that were there did a great job representing the Huskies!
    • In addition to her CPUB Outstanding Student award, Kelsey Matthews (BS Biology, Pre-Med) was also honored with a first place for her research talk in the Cell and Molecular Biology — Undergraduate Presentation division.
    • Ghaith Ibrahim (M.S. Biology) won second place in the Overall Graduate Student division that included all graduate students in both the Ecology, Evolution and Organismal and Cellular and Molecular Biology divisions for both platform and poster presentations.

    Board of Governors scholars honored

    BOG Scholars BU's Board of Governors program recently honored its 51 graduating scholars during its annual awards banquet, hosted by the Multicultural Center. The Board of Governors (BOG) Tuition Scholarship targets students who excel academically including students of various races, and students majoring in liberal arts science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Scholarship recipients are required to participate in a structured program dedicated to the enhancement of retention and graduation rates. #AcademicExcellence

    2013 BOG Scholar Graduates

    Tyler Allmond, Whitney Barksdale, Ralph Beishline, Susan Brehm, Laura Brehm, Colton Brouse, Jasmine Brown, Rachel Bushinski, Jazmin Carrasco, Raymond Carter, Ryan Cellini, Shyree Clark, Leslie Cope, Deja Davis, Jestina Drysdale, Amro Elansari., Dagaen Golomb, Sarah Gorr, Evelynn Guzman, Heather Hamilton, Eona Harrison, Caprese Harmon, Jaimie Hoffman, Johanna Hyacinthe, Latoya Jamison, Hanna Jarsocrak, Fred Johnson, Terrance Jones Jr., Kimberly Lebron, Shamirra Lloyd, Samantha Morton, Jimmy Muwombi, George Naef, Lindsey Nako, Elizabeth Ola, Tamika Oliver, Ryan Oravec, Gabriel Ortiz, Kenneth Pallis, Ryan Poticher, Caitlin Prokopchak, Tykirra Robinson, Jasmin Rockemore, Jasmin Rosario, Michelle Sherman, Michael St. John, Briana Thomas, Eli Tome, Christopher Wise, Kristin Witmer and Meredith Woy.

    English students soak in the arts of NYC

    English NYC Trip Students from Christina Francis's courses — English 364 Chaucer and English 246 British Literature I — spent the day in New York City on April 4 visiting the Metropolitan Museum and the John Pierpont Morgan Library. While visiting the Met Museum, students toured the medieval artifacts exhibits and the arms and armor displays. At the Morgan Library, in a private viewing room, a curator shared five rare and early printed books, ranging from a first edition of Malory's Morte Darthur to a 15th century Romance of the Rose with hand-painted illuminations, with the students. The Kelmscott Press edition of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales was the group's favorite. Their trip was sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts.

    TriBeta receives prestigious honor

    TriBeta BU’s Rho Chi Chapter of TriBeta, a national biology honor society, has been designated the 2011-12 Second Place winner of the Lloyd M. Bertholf Award, which was established the in 1961 to recognize the chapter which most nearly meets a series of criteria for chapter excellence. The criteria include various aspects of chapter programming, such as guest speakers and tutoring and other service projects, but emphasizes most heavily the encouragement of scholarly activity among the members. Any chapter which wins the award or either of the honorable mentions, is one in which students have been encouraged to conduct biological research, to present the work at scientific meetings, and to write and submit the work for publication in a scientific journal.

    ITM students showcase their skills and research

    ITM Students The College of Business sponsored student attendance at the Pennsylvania Association of Computer and Information Science Educators (PACISE) Conference on cyber security. April 5 and 6, the Department of Computer Science at East Stroudsburg University hosted the 28th Annual Spring Conference for PACISE, a professional organization representing faculty in all areas of computing and computing education. Bloomsburg University students in the course Systems Security Management, ITM 408, competed for the opportunity to attend the conference by researching a current topic in cyber security. Students participated in conference events while their posters were displayed. Abstracts of their research will be published in the proceedings. (L-R): John Hegarty, Aaron Reed, Ryan Dunleavy, Anthony Dellanoce, David Hummel, Korey Young, Garrett Kroboth. Not pictured: Maura Gay, Isaac Kopp, James Ruffin. BU's information and technology management (ITM) program is designed to educate individuals to effectively plan, design, select, implement, use, and administer emerging information and communication technologies. The program curriculum and instructional strategies provide students with the technical knowledge and skills needed to effectively integrate people, technology, and business processes to support organizational goals.

    NSSLHA honored at state speech-language-hearing convention

    National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association BU's chapter of the National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NSSLHA) won Chapter Honors at the PSHA convention held recently in Harrisburg. The chapter was honored for its extensive community service, including:
    • fundraising for the Danville Aphasia Center
    • participation in activities at a local nursing home
    • for its ongoing encouragement of undergraduate research through its Research Committee
    • for its support of the annual Health Sciences Symposium
    • ongoing community outreach
    • and for its financial support of the speech and language clinical programs.

    The award was accepted by NSSLHA President Brianna Haines at the annual Awards Luncheon held at convention.

    Programming Team wins PACISE Contest

    ACM A team of Computer Science students from Bloomsburg University took first place on April 6 in this year’s PACISE College Programming Contest. ACM student chapter members Nicole Burfeind, John George, and Ryan Oravec completed six problems to win the three-hour competition. The annual PACISE Programming Contest and Conference brings together students from the fourteen PASSHE schools every spring. This year 22 teams from eleven schools competed at East Stroudsburg University. Also participating from Bloomsburg were a team consisting of Shane Levengood, Dan Eubank, and David Sutherland, and team alternates Melissa Wall and Mike Young. Associate Professor of Computer Science Robert Montante is the ACM advisor for the teams. #CollaborativeLearning

    Audiology students provide screenings for at-risk youth

    Audiology Doctorate Program BU's audiology doctoral students under the direction of Thomas Zalewski, Ph.D., associate professor of audiology, completed hearing screenings in April at The Family YMCA of Easton, Phillipsburg, N.J., and Vicinity. The Pre-K Counts Program offered by the Family YMCA of Easton, Phillipsburg and Vicinity is a program for children ages 3, 4 and 5 residing in the Easton Area School District and surrounding school districts whot are at risk of school failure. Children in these programs are English Language Learner, Disabled, or Developmentally Delayed. As part of the BU’s audiology program community outreach, the group made visits to three Family YMCA Head Starr programs:
    • Pre-K Counts
    • the Early Childhood Development Center
    • the Annex Kindergarten Program

    Approximately 100 children at these three sites on three different days had their hearing screened using pure tone audiometry or otoacoustic emissions. BU's audiology department and The Family YMCA understand the importance of early intervention and the benefits of identifying hearing loss as soon as possible to allow these children to develop a solid educational foundation. #SenseOfCommunity

    Huskies finish third in PASSHE Business Plan Competition

    Paul Rosa  and Sean Roth A proposed internet and mobile based marketing platform designed to help small businesses effectively market their promotions to college students took the top prize in the second Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) Student Business Plan Competition. » The plan for Dorm Discount (.com) was developed by Krutarth Patel, a student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP). The service would provide a unique self-service coupon creator and management system that business owners would use to generate, monitor and modify promotions easily and conveniently. Its goal would be to maximize savings to college students while boosting revenues for small business owners » Thomas Rounsville Jr. of East Stroudsburg and East Stroudsburg University took second place in the competition with his proposal to create a system that would allow investigators collecting evidence at a wildlife crime scene to use essentially the same techniques and technologies that are used in human forensics. The use of such technology in the field could result in rapid identification of potential poachers. » Paul Rosa and Sean Roth, both students at Bloomsburg University, took third place with a proposal to create a social network that would allow sports fans to post 15-second video clips of themselves speaking about popular topics, which then could be viewed by a mass audience. It would give the user the ability to interact and reply to other fans’ video posts with their own video posts while experiencing smooth site navigation in an online sports community. The winners of the competition will receive $10,000, $5,000 and $2,500 respectively, to be used as seed money to assist in the startup of their proposed business ventures. More than 200 student teams competed in this year’s competition, designed to provide student entrepreneurs a real-world opportunity to pitch their original business plans. The competition was sponsored by PSECU, F&M Trust, PNC Bank, Hershey Entertainment & Resorts and JP Morgan and was partially funded by a Keystone Innovation Grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development.

    Enactus wins regional champion

    Enactus Enactus, an international student organization that works with leaders in business and higher education, to mobilize university students to make a difference in their communities. BU’s Enactus team recently attended the Northeast Regional Competition in New York City, winning regional champion. They will now advance to the National Exposition in Kansas City, where they will be competing against universities from all over the United States. In addition, four of the active members received the Enactus Leadership Award for achievement of more than 100 volunteer hours throughout this academic year. The competition also included a career fair, where students were interviewed on the spot for internships and full time positions. To learn more about Enactus and their role in the campus community, please contact Dominique Clark, at ddc32886@huskies.bloomu.edu.

    FOCUS caps semester with one last visitation

    Bethel Deliverance International BU’s Office of Minority Affairs is hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, May 12, at 10:45 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Free breakfast at 10:15 a.m. Come be part of the service! There will be a shuttle bus on a continuous loop to pick up students who live on upper campus from 9:45 to 11 a.m. Contact Marcei Woods at (570) 389-4091 for more information.

    Frederick Douglass descendant highlights FDI Conference

    Kenneth Morris, Jr. Kenneth Morris, Jr., the great-great-grandson of escaped slave and abolitionist Frederick Douglass, will be the keynote speaker Thursday, May 2, for the 13th Annual Frederick Douglass Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Conference. Morris will discuss human trafficking, modern-day slavery and why we must create a new abolitionist movement at 7 p.m. in the KUB Multipurpose B room. His presentation highlights a busy day for on-campus conference sponsored by the Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence and the American Democracy Project. #AcademicExcellence | #CollaborativeLearning | @FredDouglassSon

    Thursday, May 2

    • 9:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. — Student Panels, Kehr Union Building
    • 4 to 5:15 p.m. — Faculty and Student Panel on Post-Racial America, KUB Multipurpose B
    • 7 p.m. — Kenneth Morris, Jr., presents, “History, Human Rights and the Power of One”

    Friday, May 3

    • 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. — Student Panels, Kehr Union Building

    Post-Racial America: Dream or Reality?

    Post-Racial AmericaBU will host, Post-Racial America: Dream or Reality?," on Thursday, May 2, from 4 to 5:15 p.m. in the KUB Multipurpose B. This panel explores current identity politics surrounding the election of President Barack Obama as the first Black president of the United States. After he was elected president the first time, the notion that the U.S. finally reached a post-racial turn emerged in public discourse. His re-election this year reaffirmed the notion of a post-racial America. Post-racism is an ideology undermining the issue of race in current intercultural relationships. From this standpoint, President Obama’s election signifies the realization of Martin Luther King’s dream of racial equality. It also signifies that racial barriers in the U.S. no longer exist, which gives Americans more equal opportunities to pursue individual freedom. Post-racism, however, has also been contested in public discourse. From the standpoint of those who reject the notion of post-racial America, the election of the first U.S. Black president has not erased the disparities between people of color, particularly African Americans, and whites in terms of income, employment and education opportunities, and health benefits. It does not warrant social equality and liberty. Others also view post-racism as the end of white domination in the U.S and, thus, a form of reverse racism. Through this panel, faculty and students enter the public discourse on post-racial America. Panelists
    • S. Ekema Agbaw (Professor, Department of English, Bloomsburg University)
    • Christopher F. Armstrong (Professor, Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice, Bloomsburg University)
    • Jacob Neiheisel (PhD candidate in Political Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison)
    • Amy Okalemajani (Senior student in Political Science, East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania)
    • Conrad Quintyn (Chair and Associate Professor of Anthropology, Bloomsburg University)
    • David Hanley-Tejeda (Moderator- Adjunct Faculty, Department of Communication Studies at Bloomsburg University and Ph.D. candidate at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale)

    BOG students extend helping hand to Haiti

    Project Haiti BU’s Board of Governors scholars are organizing a clothing drive for Haiti, specifically targeting underprivileged children. However, adult clothing will also be accepted at openly displayed collection containers across campus. Haiti was chosen, according to organizers, due to the current the country’s current debilitated situation in the wake of the January 2010 earthquake that kills a reported 220,000 people. Three years later, many Haitians remain homeless and in dire need of clothing. Donations are being accepted at various locations the rest of this semester to include Student Services Center, Andruss Library and lower campus residence halls. Project Haiti is being sponsored by the BU’s Board of Governors scholarship program along with the Office of Minority Affairs. Contact Carson Merine at cmm76928@huskies.bloomu.edu for details.

    Children’s book author visits Campus Child Center

    Campus Child Center To kick off a week of learning about writing and illustrating, the BU Campus Child Center's preschool class had the opportunity to meet a new author, Donna Rae Green and her grandchildren, Sammy and Breanna. Green read the story, “There is a Giraffe in my Backyard,” written by herself and her grandson Sammy. She then collaborated with preschool teacher, Megan Shields, to incorporate shared writing and letter work into an activity for the children. The children then illustrated their own story about an animal in their own backyard and with help wrote their very own stories! (L-R) Breanna Frattarelli, Sammy Frattarelli, Taylor Chikotas, Seraphim Kramarz, Ryan Derr, Cerick Austin, Donna Rae Green, Quinn Yachimowski, Hannah Magill, Callie Ulmer, Bjork Millard and Alaina Scott.

    Anthropology majors shine at Society for Applied Anthropology meetings

    Society for Applied Anthropology Ten anthropology students recently showcased their research on a national stage ranging from cost benefits of fracking to time budgeting to disaster perception and preparedness. Students participated at the 73rd Society for Applied Anthropology Annual Meetings in Denver, from March 19 to 25, under the theme — Natural Resource Distribution and Development in the 21st Century. Students presented posters on research, internship, and applied projects. They also attended a roundtable organized by Faith Warner with DeeAnne Wymer and Gabrielle Vielhauer as discussants where they learned about preparing for graduate school from representatives of the leading graduate programs in applied anthropology. #CollaborativeLearning

    Car show helps provide support for cancer charity

    Car Show A recent on-campus car show sponsored by BU’s Office of Residence Life raised more than $250 to benefit the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. Community Assistant Shawn Miscioscia, along with other community assistants on upper campus and Kile Apartments, planned the public car show that drew 11 classic cars on Saturday, April 16, where all proceeds were donated to the breast cancer foundation. Nancy G. Brinker promised her dying sister, Susan G. Komen, she would do everything in her power to end breast cancer forever. In 1982, that promise became Susan G. Komen for the Cure and launched the global breast cancer movement. Today, Susan G. Komen is the boldest community fueling the best science and making the biggest impact in the fight against breast cancer. Since then, almost $2 billion has been raised to fulfill the foundation’s promise, working to end breast cancer through ground-breaking research, community health outreach, advocacy and programs in more than 50 countries.

    Council of Trustees: Resolution Passes — BU will apply for a $2 million grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development to offset some of the cost of upgrading the steam plant. In a brief May 3 meeting conducted by conference call, BU’s Council of Trustees approved a resolution authorizing university staff to prepare and submit an Alternative and Clean Energy Program grant application by the May 10 deadline. The Trustee’s action was required for the application to be submitted. Previously approved by Trustees, the $10 million project will upgrade and reconfigure the central steam plant to a combined heat and power plant with a combination of biomass and natural gas boilers. The design work is expected to begin this fall with construction to start in 2015, according to Eric Ness, assistant vice president for facilities.

    Town welcomes Greenly Center project

    Greenly Center Bloomsburg native Duane R. Greenly and his wife, Susan Basar Greenly, moved 14 times as his career took him from city to city. The Town of Bloomsburg became his anchor, he said, and soon will become home to a building that carries his family’s name.

    The Greenlys, members of Bloomsburg State College’s Class of 1972, are giving back to the local area with a $1 million gift to the BU Foundation. The donation from the Mechanicsburg couple will establish The Greenly Center on the site of the former Cole’s Hardware in downtown Bloomsburg.

    The 44,700-square-foot Greenly Center will house the offices of the Bloomsburg University Foundation and other tenants in a four-story structure with underground parking. Pending needed approvals, the project will begin in August with the razing of the building currently located at 50 E. Main St. Completion of the $6.5 million project is expected in June or July 2014. #SenseOfCommunity

    The Big Event: A day of giving back


    The Big Event

    More than 1,700 students sprawled across Bloomsburg on Saturday, April 6, for a massive spring cleaning campaign, signaling the largest and greatest effort CGA’s The Big Event has seen in its four years of existence.

    Each spring, BU students get together in teams to take the opportunity and say, “Thank you" to Bloomsburg area residents by completing various tasks, such as raking leaves, weeding, painting, etc. at homes, churches and businesses. #CGABigEvent | #SenseOfCommunity

    Alumna a key figure in Boston's trauma response

    Dr. Tracey Dechert Dr. Tracey Dechert, a 1988 Bloomsburg University graduate and trauma surgeon at Boston Medical Center, has been among the prominent spokespeople from the medical center interviewed in recent days in response to Monday's bomb explosion during the Boston Marathon. She has been the key spokesperson on the status of the victims, their conditions and how they were treated at the medical center. Dr. Dechert is also an assistant professor of surgery at the Boston University School of Medicine. Among the media outlets using Dr. Dechert as a source include CNN, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. The toll from the bombs, which killed at least three and injured more than 170, will long be felt by anyone involved with the city’s iconic sporting event, according to news reports.

    COE scores high for secondary education

    With about 16,000 of newly certified teachers in Pennsylvania a year, a good question is: How well do colleges and universities prepare them? The highest ratings in Pennsylvania were three stars to undergraduate secondary programs at two state universities, Bloomsburg and Mansfield. Beth Mauch, dean of the College of Education at Bloomsburg, said, "We have been working for the last several years now to really improve our teacher preparation programs. This is just one more indicator we're doing a good job."

    Professor lands $250k grant for testing

    Karl Kapp Karl Kapp, professor of instructional technology, in partnership with Sinclair Community College in Dayton, Ohio, and the National Office of Project Lead the Way has recently been awarded a three year $250,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technology Education (ATE) program. The project is to create and disseminate an open source, online virtual tensile strength testing simulation. Materials created from this project will be utilized by undergraduate engineering technology students and pre-engineering high school students in the Project Lead the Way network of 4,215 schools nationwide.

    Future Focus: Inside Science and Technology

    COST Career Day
    Hartline Science Center BU’s College of Science and Technology hosted a Career Day on Friday, April 5, in the KUB Ballroom for its students and 70 returning alumni, who served as presenters and panelists. Career Day is a great opportunity for students to directly network with alumni in their prospective career fields. Students gained helpful insight, learn of internships, and established possible references with alumni by participating in the COST's Career Day.

    Panels consisted of alumni from the following career fields: Allied Health Sciences, Audiology and Speech Pathology, Biology, Chemistry and Physics, Computer Science, Digital Forensics, Environmental, Geographical, and Geological Sciences, Exercise Science, Internships, Instructional Technology, Mathematics, and Math and Science Secondary Education, and Nursing. Booths were also be set up in the Kehr Union Ballroom lobby showcasing internships, regional area employers, and the College of Science and Technology's undergraduate and graduate degree programs.

    Civil rights leader provides perspective on race history

    Julian Bond

    Julian Bond, former chairman of the NAACP, talked about race, its role in history and today’s political environment as the keynote speaker of the 20th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Banquet.

    “Those who say race is history are wrong,” he said. “History is race.”

    Bond’s discussion spanned decades — from his participation in the movements for civil rights and economic justice during the 1960s to his observations on today’s political agenda and his involvement in a recent protest against the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline at the White House.

    Alumna sheds light on today's media

    Rebecca Campbell

    Rebecca Funk Campbell ’83, president of the ABC-Owned Television Stations Group, told students during her first visit to campus since graduating, “You have made TV personal.”

    Campbell returned to Bloomsburg as an invited distinguished speaker to discuss the future of television. Prior to the public lecture, she meet with the mass communications department, as well as toured the campus — including BU’s state-of-the-art high definition video studio — that has significantly changed over the past three decades.

    “For decades, television could be watched only one way and audiences had a choice of three channels. Today, eight stations that are part of the ABC-Owned Television Stations Group have a total of 87 platforms, including video game consoles, smart phones and tablets.”

    DEA agent reveals ins-and-outs of undercover life

    Michael Levine

    Michael Levine discussed his "Life as an International Deep Cover Agent" as part of BU's Department of Criminal Justice's annual Law Enforcement Career Day. Levine — the author of NY Times non-fiction best-seller "Deep Cover" and "Fight Back: How to Take Your Own Community Back From The Drug Dealers" — is one of the most highly decorated DEA agents in that agency's history. He was charged with design and orchestration of some of the government's most significant national and international Deep Cover and conspiracy investigations.

    “I learned at the point of a gun, something I thought I would live forever,” he said. “I got into a fight. He pulled his gun with no warning, stuck it in my stomach and pulled the trigger. It misfired. What I learned at that moment … any moment is the right moment to die. Life is short.”

    Levine held multiple positions in the DEA, including Group Supervisor in the New York City Field Division, Special Operations Officer worldwide and Country Attaché to Argentina and Uruguay. He has served as a media law enforcement consultant for top national TV and radio shows including 60 Minutes, McNeil Lehrer News Hour and Frontline.

    What makes a relay event special?

    Many moments create the unique Relay for LIfe experience. #BURelay4Life

      Relay for Life
    • Survivors Lap ... all cancer survivors at the event take the first lap around the track, celebrating their victory over cancer while cheered on by the other participants who line the track. Relay For Life events also recognize and celebrate caregivers, who give time, love, and support to their friends, family, neighbors, and coworkers facing cancer.
    • Luminaria Ceremony ... takes place after dark, so we can remember people we have lost to cancer, honor people who have fought cancer in the past, and support those whose fight continues. Candles are lit inside of personalized bags and are placed around the Relay track as glowing tributes to those who’ve been affected by cancer.
    • Fight Back Ceremony ... symbolizes the emotional commitment each of us can make in the fight against cancer. The action taken represents what we are willing to do for ourselves, for our loved ones, and for our community to fight cancer year-round and to commit to saving lives.
    • History of Relay For Life ... In May 1985, Dr. Gordy Klatt walked and ran for 24 hours around a track in Tacoma, Washington, ultimately raising $27,000 to help the American Cancer Society fight the nation’s biggest health concern – cancer. A year later, 340 supporters joined the overnight event. Since those first steps, the Relay For Life movement has grown into a worldwide phenomenon, raising more than $4 billion to fight cancer.

    Creating a veteran friendly campus

    Curtis Branch BU will be hosting Curtis Branch, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and chief for the Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center of the Veterans Administration New Jersey Health Care System in Newark, N.J., who help lead a series of interactive events designed to help create a veteran friendly campus. The event will be held on Tuesday, April 30, from 1 to 9 p.m. in the KUB Multipurpose A. It's open free to the public and campus community.

    Schedule of Events

    • 1 to 2:30 p.m. — Creating a Veteran Friendly Campus: Veteran Needs, Recruitment, and Retention of Veterans
    • 2:30 to 3 p.m. — Open Forum with Faculty, Staff, Veterans, and Students
    • 3 to 4 p.m. — The Comparison Between Younger and Older Veterans and the Perception of Veterans
    • 4 to 4:30 p.m. — Open Forum with Faculty, Staff, Veterans, and Students
    • 4:30 to 5 p.m. — The Use of Technology to Connect with Veterans
    • 7 to 8 p.m. — Veteran Transition from Military Deployment to College Life Challenges and Resources
    • 8 to 8:30 p.m. — Q&A

    Branch holds degrees from Johnson C. Smith University (B.A., psychology), Columbia University (M.A., developmental psychology), and Penn State University (Ph.D. clinical psychology and developmental psychology). He completed pre-doctoral clinical training at University of Colorado Medical Center and post-doctoral training at Fort Logan Mental Health Center, Denver, Colorado. Branch has held academic positions at a variety of institutions including University of Colorado-Boulder and Teacher’s College, Columbia University. In 1993-1994 he became the first American granted a Senior Fulbright Scholar Award (in Psychology) to Romania. #SenseOfCommunity

    Young coders put to the test

    Computer ProgrammingNearly 200 students forming 43 teams across Pennsylvania, as well as teams from Maryland and Massachusetts, recently matched wits and computer coding skills at BU’s 18th Annual High School Programming Contest, where they had up to three hours to solve 10 college-level computer science problems as a team.

    Students, accompanied by their high school teachers, tackled a series of computer programming problems with varying difficulty. Winning teams were determined by how many problems they solved within the three-hour limit. Prices included Kindles, portable hard drive, wireless mice and keyboards, flash drives, etc. #CollaborativeLearning

    Marcellus Shale Documentary Project

    Marcellus Shale Documentary Project The Moose Exchange Stairwell Gallery is proud to announce an upcoming exhibition entitled Marcellus Shale Documentary Project. The exhibition includes the work of six professional photographers that share in the telling of the complex story of Marcellus Shale gas drilling in Pennsylvania. This traveling exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, April 19, at 6 p.m. and will remain on view through June 8.

    Artist Talks are scheduled for Wednesday, May 1, beginning at 5 p.m. Three of the six photographers in the exhibition will be present to discuss the project and their individual contributions to it. The Marcellus Shale Documentary Project photographers are Noah Addis, Nina Berman, Brian Cohen, Scott Goldsmith, Lynn Johnson, and Martha Rial. In conjunction with the exhibition, a series of related programming has been scheduled throughout the duration of the exhibition. Please see the attached schedule of events for topics, times and locations. All events are free and open to the public.

    For the best part of a year, the photographers travelled across the Commonwealth, meeting people, listening to and recording stories, and documenting images from across the region. The exhibition represents each photographer’s aesthetic, each having chosen a different angle from which to view the subject. Together, they offer a compelling narrative that represents, they believe, an honest appraisal of how the arrival of Marcellus Shale drilling has affected communities around the Commonwealth. For additional information about the exhibition at the Moose Exchange, please visit mooseexchange.org or contact Sue O’Donnell at sue.mooseexchange@gmail.com

    Upcoming Speaker: John Peeler

    John Peeler, Ph.D., presidential professor of political science, emeritus Bucknell University, will present, "Hugo Chavez and the Bolivarian Revolution in Venezula," on Monday, April 22, 7 p.m., in McCormick Center 1303. Peeler has engaged in a comparative analysis of the phenomenon of liberal democracy in Latin America. Since the completion of his book Democracy and Human Rights in Latin America (co-edited with Richard Hillman and Elsa Cardozo), he begun to develop an interest in the changing political roles of indigenous people in Latin America. His visit is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and the International Faculty Association.

    The “Bolivarian Revolution” refers to a leftist social movement and political process in Venezuela led by late Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez, the founder of the Fifth Republic Movement (replaced by the United Socialist Party of Venezuela in 2007). The "Bolivarian Revolution" is named after Simón Bolívar, an early 19th century Venezuelan and Latin American revolutionary leader, prominent in the Spanish American wars of independence in achieving the independence of most of northern Latin America from Spanish rule. According to Chávez and other supporters, the "Bolivarian Revolution" seeks to build a mass movement to implement Bolivarianism - popular democracy, economic independence, equitable distribution of revenues, and an end to political corruption - in Venezuela. They interpret Bolívar's ideas from a socialist perspective. #SpeakerSeries

    Phi Beta Lambda has strong showing at state conference

    Phi Beta Lambda Fifteen students competed in Gettysburg on April 13 at the 42nd Pennsylvania Phi Beta Lambda State Leadership Conference. BU had 4 winners:
    • John Katona, second place in Accounting for Professionals
    • Nicole Jubin, second place in Retail Marketing
    • Carol Bachman, third place in Future Business Teacher
    • Daniel Vogel, third place in Small Business Management Plan

    All winners are eligible to be a primary competitor or an alternate at the Phi Beta Lambda National Leadership Conference in Anaheim, CA, June, 2013. Competition was intense, and the following schools were well represented: California University of PA, Indiana University of PA, and Shippensburg University, (PASSHE); Alvernia University, Bucknell University, Drexel University, Duquesne University, Lebanon Valley College, Penn State main campus, Penn State Brandywine, Temple University, and University of Pittsburgh, among a host of other colleges, community colleges, and two year business programs.

    The breakout sessions consisted of presentation by business leaders from US Steel, PNC Bank, Ernst & Young, and Men’s Warehouse, among others. Ed Pitingolo, associate professor of accounting and PBL adviser, says it was a good conference and great experience for students.

    Lavender Graduation

    Lavender Graduation Ceremony Please join the LGBTQA Community of Bloomsburg University for the Third Annual Lavender Graduation Ceremony in KUB Multipurpose-B on Friday, April 19, at 5:30 p.m. A brief reception will follow the ceremony, refreshments will be provided. If you are a recent graduate or are planning to graduate in the upcoming calendar year, please complete this form!

    2013 Lavender Commencement Speaker — Ashley Hope is a 25 year old transgender woman who has been transitioning for almost 4 years. Before graduating from Millersville University in December 2010, she was president of her campus's GSA, MU Allies, and worked to make the group and her campus more aware and inclusive of the transgender students, faculty, and staff, resulting in amongst other things, rebranding the GSA a "Gender and Sexuality Alliance" and helping to create a new policy to include gender neutral bathrooms in any new or renovated buildings on campus.

    What is Lavender Graduation? — The ceremony celebrates the many accomplishments of LGBTQ students and Allies at Bloomsburg University. The LGBTQA Commission wants to take this opportunity to honor our graduates and to thank them for all that they do for the LGBTQ community and the university as a whole. It is also a time for the graduates to thank individuals for their support during the graduates’ time at BU.

    Who attends Lavender Graduation? — Each April, we honor Undergraduate and Graduate Students who have already or plan to finish their degree during any semester in the current academic or calendar year. Also, each graduate will be able to identify a significant other who they would specifically like to honor at graduation (see participant form). All students, faculty, staff, and alumni are welcome to attend the ceremony. Feel free to ask guests to join you for the celebration.

    Why should I participate? — Lavender Graduation is a time for you to take pride in yourself and your achievements at BU. By participating, you will be visible sign of the strength of our community and serve as an example to future LGBTQA graduates. It also allows you an opportunity to thank those individuals in your life that have supported you during your time in school.

    Be an Ally. Be the Change.

    Ally Week

    • Thursday, April 18, 11 a.m. Quad – Tie Die
    • Thursday, April 18, noon to 1 p.m., KUB Hideaway – Ally Training
    • Friday, April 19 – Day of Silence
    • Friday, April 19, 5 p.m., Quad – Breaking the Silence
    • Friday, April 19, 5:30 p.m. – Lavender Graduation
    • Friday, April 19, 9 p.m. – Trip to Twist Nightclub

    Use the #BUallies to join the Ally Week discussion, as well as send questions to guest speakers and share your experiences this week!

    Upcoming Speaker: George J. Borjas

    George J. Borjas George J. Borjas, an esteemed Harvard University professor, will talk “Immigration and Economics” on Thursday, April 18 at 2 p.m. in KUB Multipurpose 245 A&B. Borjas is a Robert W. Scrivner Professor of Economics and Social Policy at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. His visit is sponsored by BU’s Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts and International Economics Honor Society.

    Borjas received his Ph.D. in economics from Columbia University. His teaching and research interests focus on the impact of government regulations on labor markets, with an emphasis on the economic impact of immigration. He is the author of “Wage Policy in the Federal Bureaucracy;” “Friends or Strangers: The Impact of Immigrants on the U.S. Economy;” “Heaven’s Door: Immigration Policy and the American Economy;” and the textbook Labor Economics. He also edited Immigration and the Work Force; Issues in the Economics of Immigration; and Poverty, International Migration and Asylum. In addition, Borjas has been a consultant to various government agencies.

    Shattering the silence of sexual violence

    Angela Rose Kidnapped in broad daylight at the age of 17 from a shopping mall parking lot, Angela Rose recounts her haunting experience of being bound in a paroled murderer’s car and her fight for justice that followed. Rose reveals her story on Wednesday, April 17, at 6 p.m. in KUB Multipurpose A, followed by BU’s annual Take Back the Night candle vigil.

    Working with her attacker’s previous victims, Rose turned a suburban community into a group of proactive citizens, culminating with the passage of the Sexually Violent Persons Commitment Act in Illinois. Angela went on to found PAVE: Promoting Awareness, Victim Empowerment—a national non-profit created to shattered the silence of sexual violence. She has encountered countless sexual assault survivors, many of whom were victimized by someone they knew and trusted. In her moving sexual assault keynote, Rose helps students dispel myths and understand the dangers of sexual violence both from strangers and from those we know and trust. She also discusses the dangerous role that alcohol plays in sexual violence. #SpeakerSeries

    FOCUS with siblings and children

    Bethel Deliverance International BU’s Office of Minority Affairs is hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, April 14, at 10:30 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Free breakfast at 10:15 a.m. Come be part of the service! There will be a shuttle bus on a continuous loop to pick up students who live on upper campus from 9:45 to 11 a.m. A free gift will be given to all siblings. Contact Marcei Woods at (570) 389-4091 for more information.

    NSSE seeks opinions of freshmen, seniors

    Each member of BU’s first-year and senior classes is invited to share opinions about his or her experiences at BU by completing the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). According to Sheila Dove Jones, director of BU’s planning and assessment office, answers to the online survey will reveal students’ views on the quality of their education and their level of involvement in activities outside of the classroom. Results will be used to improve the undergraduate experience and as a baseline measurement for BU’s new general education requirements that took effect in fall 2012.

    National Survey of Student Engagement In appreciation for participating, students who complete the survey by May 1 will be automatically entered in a random drawing to win one of six $50 gift cards or one of 20 Bloomsburg University prizes worth $10 or more. A student’s chance of winning depends on how many students complete the survey. The last time this survey was administered, about 800 students responded. Based on this estimate, odds of winning are 1 in 31. Take the survey online at www.nssesurvey.org.

    Approximately 3,900 BU students have been invited to participate. A total of 546 U.S. colleges and universities and 285,000 first-year students and seniors participated in the 2012 survey. For more information, contact Jones at (570) 389-4027 or sjones@bloomu.edu.

    Translating the American Dream

    Anna Monardo Anna Monardo, an award-winning author of “The Courtyard of Dreams” and “Falling in Love with Natassia” will visit campus on Thursday, April 11, for a lecture, question and answer session, and class visits. Her lecture, "Translating the American Dream," will take place at 7:30 p.m. in McCormick Center 1303. Her question and answer session will take place at 3:30 p.m. in 004 Warren Student Services Center. All these events, sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts, Department of English, and Gender Studies Minor (GSM), are free and open to the public.

    Monardo, the first member of her Italian family born in the U.S., grew up in Pittsburgh. After receiving her B.A. from St. Mary’s College at Notre Dame, IN, she attended the Radcliffe Publishing Procedures Course. Her first jobs were in publishing—at Farrar, Straus & Giroux; Random House; and McCall’s. She earned her M.F.A. in Creative Writing at Columbia University, where she received the Clare Woolrich Fellowship and interned with Teachers & Writers Collaborative. Now an associate professor and chair of the Writer’s Workshop at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, Monardo has also taught in the M.F.A. Creative Writing Program at Eastern Washington University, the Writer’s Voice of the West Side Y in New York City and the Bennington College July Program. #SpeakerSeries

    The Path to Purpose in Work and Life

    William Damon William Damon, a leading expert on ethical development and the development of a sense of purpose, will present, “The Path to Purpose in Work and Life,” on Tuesday, April 9, at 7 p.m. in Carver Hall’s Gross Auditorium. By focusing his work on the positive aspects of “growing up” rather than on the severe behavioral problems of adolescents, Damon has put himself on the forefront of the emerging positive psychology movement in the United States. Damon speaks regularly to public and academic audiences about contemporary trends in child development and has written widely about personal development and moral commitment at all ages of life.

    Damon, professor of education at Stanford University and director of the Stanford Center on Adolescence, is currently researching how people develop character and a sense of purpose in their work, family, and community relationships. He also examines how young people can approach their careers with a focus on purpose, imagination, and high standards of excellence. Damon also has written widely about how to educate for ethical understanding. His work is used in professional training programs in journalism, law, and business. #SpeakerSeries

    Not your typical Spring Break trip

    Panama Spring Break Five students — Kim Johnson, Katie Pyle, Kaitlin Heimbach, Anna Neuhard and Josh Powell — spent Spring Break on an educational immersion experience in Panamá, Central America. The trip was non-stop, as they:

    • visited the northern Panamá territories of the Kuna Yala (the San Blas Islands)
    • learned about cocoa production the Bocas del Toro region
    • learned about coffee production in the highlands of Boquete
    • took Spanish lessons
    • visited the Panama Canal
    • of course ... squeezed in time for swimming, snorkeling and zip lining

    Contact Chris Donahue, of Languages and Cultures, for information on learning opportunities in Panama.

    Voice makes connections at College Media Convention

    The Voice Thirteen student editors of The Voice recently returned from New York City, where they attended the national College Media Convention along with 1,500 other university students and their advisers from across the country. The three-day conference, March 10 to 12, included 275 sessions on all aspects of journalism and media. Keynote speakers came from the Today Show, Teen Vogue magazine, and Twitter.

    Four editors from The Voice — Vanessa Pellechio, Joe Fisher, Tom Ciampoli, and Rae Meade —l and their adviser, Mary Bernath, were among those who presented sessions. Their talk, "Managing Your Media Menagerie," sparked a lively interchange about how to optimize the strong and unique personalities that come together in a college newsroom.

    Alumni, students network at annual leadership summit

    Husky Summit About 200 alumni and students participated in the Sixth Annual Husky Leadership Summit, where alumni shared their life and career experiences with student leaders during the day-long summit that aims to make the leadership experience on campus even stronger. Students represented various campus leadership groups: Community Government Association, Husky Ambassadors, Orientation Workshop Leaders, Resident Advisers/Community Assistants, Presidential Leadership Program, Program Board, D.A.S.L., Greek Leadership (IFC and NPC).

    This year's summit featured a career networking center for students to talk individually with alumni currently working in their career fields. Alumni also gave presentations on several topics related to post-college life, such as how to get a job and negotiate a salary, managing personal finances and the ins and outs of career networking. A panel of graduates fielded questions from students.

    Upcoming Speaker: Terrance Roberts

    Terrance Roberts Terrence Roberts — one of the Little Rock Nine, the nine African-American students who volunteered to attend Little Rock Central High School in 1957 in the wake of Brown v. Board of Education — will discuss his experience and lessons learned on Tuesday, April 2, at 7 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom. After Little Rock’s high schools were closed the following school year, Roberts completed his senior year at Los Angeles High School. He went on to CSULA, UCLA and Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, where in 1976 he earned his Ph.D. in Psychology. He was on the faculty of Antioch University and now runs a private psychology practice right here in Pasadena.

    He is, by all accounts, a remarkable man, quiet but impressive. He wrote a book, “Lessons from Little Rock,” a memoir that offers Roberts’ perspective on our nation’s fitful march towards racial equality, sketches of the other members of the Nine, a portrait of his life before it took the stage of history, and more. He is said to both speak and write with precision, insight, humor and vision. His visit is sponsored by the Multicultural Center Black History Month Committee and the Office of Social Equity. #SpeakerSeries

    Career Day: Your future in law enforcement

    Michael Levine BU is hosting a Law Enforcement Career Day on Monday, April 1, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. for recruiters to meet with upcoming graduates in the KUB Ballroom. It's also a day where students can speak with recruiters to gain a better understanding of what jobs are offered for future hires. As part of Law Enforcement Career Day, Michael Levine, will discuss his "Life as an International Deep Cover Agent" at 7 p.m. in Carver Hall's Gross Auditorium. Levine is the author of NY Times non-fiction best-seller "Deep Cover" and "Fight Back: How to Take Your Own Community Back From The Drug Dealers," and was also the subject of Donald Goddard's biography "Undercover." He is co-author (with Laura Kavanau) of "The Big White Lie" and "Triangle Death." his books continue to acquire sterling reviews and international recognition.

    Levine is one of the most highly decorated DEA agents in that agency's history. He was charged with design and orchestration of some of the government's most significant national and international Deep Cover and conspiracy investigations. Levine held multiple positions in the DEA, including Group Supervisor in the New York City Field Division, Special Operations Officer worldwide and Country Attaché to Argentina and Uruguay. Levine has served as a media law enforcement consultant for top national TV and radio shows including 60 Minutes, McNeil Lehrer News Hour and Frontline. He has also been retained as a technical consultant for multiple television series, and has appeared as an expert on various law enforcement related topics for numerous local television shows around the country. #SpeakerSeries

    Husky Unleashed: And the winners are ...

    We are Huskies. We believe in working hard to make our dreams become a reality. At Bloomsburg University, being a Husky is about striving to be the best ... in the classroom, in the community and in your career. More than 30 students shared their story last semester of how BU has made a difference in their lives. And this semester, you picked the two best examples of Unleash your Inner Husky!

    Student artists showcase work at Haas

    Student Art Show Students with a passion for art will showcase their works during a reception on Friday, March 29, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Haas Gallery of Art. The reception is part of BU’s annual Student Art Show, which runs through April 9 and is open to the public free of charge. The theme for this year’s show is “Human Nature.” Students are presenting pieces from mediums including painting, photography and prints. Outstanding pieces will be awarded honors by a juried panel. The Student Art Show is sponsored by the Student Art Association.

    Phi Beta Lambda alums lend advice to current members

    Phi Beta Lambda Three former members of Phi Beta Lambda, who have since graduated, volunteered their time to speak on Feb. 18 about their personal hardships since graduation. Jeremy Rhen, the former president, Meghan Hunter, former secretary, and Emily Marlin, former webmaster, shared insight into what life is like after college.

    “I got a big wake-up call,” Rhen said with a smile on his face as he reported the struggles he encountered when trying to find a job. He admitted that he thought grades had been enough, and that he had a pretty impressive resume. Unfortunately, that isn’t all it takes. “Start networking now,” all three of the former members said in agreement. “Take advantage of the opportunities on campus to mingle with alumni,” Marlin encouraged. Hunter even shared a personal experience where these school events came in handy. Soon after receiving her job at Reeves International Toys, she was shipped off to Las Vegas for a conference. It’s intimidating to be in a room full of CEO’s and important people, but luckily she had her experience at Bloomsburg to fall back on.

    They also agreed that it is important to get involved. Marlin’s unpaid internship at the American Cancer Society actually caused her to receive her current position as a recruiter for the organization. All three stated that serving as an officer in PBL had been some of the best moments of their college careers. It taught them the importance of team work, and how to work with a large group of people. It also taught them to be accountable for their own work, and to see a task through no matter what.

    Fracking research presented on national stage

    Fracking Research Julie Steffen, a December 2012 anthropology graduate, along with Faith Warner, Ph.D., associate professor of anthropology, presented their research, “The Perceived Costs and Benefits of Fracking in Central Pennsylvania,” at the Society for Applied Anthropology Annual Meetings in Denver, March 2013.

    The ethnographic research presented in this poster documents perceptions of local residents towards the impact of fracking on the region’s environment, economy, laws, and culture. Central foci of the research include the disagreement over the risks associated with fracking, conflict over the distribution of its benefits, and the resulting community tensions over changes in socioeconomic relations, the social and natural environment, laws, policies, and regulations relating to the fracking boom.

    The central goal of the research project was to document the often volatile and divisive attitudes of people who live within 30 miles of a fracking well in the Marcellus Shale Region in the vicinity of Williamsport in order to develop a clearer understanding of the degree to which community members perceive both the costs and benefits of fracking to themselves and their community at large.

    Business executive sheds light on students’ career options

    Student Chapter of APIC BU’s Student Chapter of APICS along with the Phi Beta Lambda Student Chapter, and the Business Living Learning Community, sponsored a presentation on March 7 by Ronn Cort, President of KYDEX, LLC. For the past 10 years, Cort has been instrumental in driving international sales growth and was a key player in the development of the designLab, an innovative, collaborative workspace where KYDEX and its clients can work together to create new solutions.

    Cort presented on doing business globally and told how he explored new markets for KYDEX. His primary story centered on entering the mass transit market in Poland, where thermo-molded plastics were not used in rail cars. He told the audience how they identified potential in this industry and walked through the multiple years and experiences it took to eventually get KYDEX plastics into the rail car manufacturers.

    Cort gave a colorful presentation to almost 175 business students in Hartline’s Kuster Auditorium. The highlight was his emphasis on the purpose of the company: to grow, which will allow them to not only keep, but grow the number of good-paying jobs in this area. We are fortunate to have such a dedicated company — and company president — right in our back yard.

    Army ROTC cadets hit training in full force

    Army ROTC
    BU’s Army ROTC dedicated recent weekends to outside the classroom training to help prepare cadets for future officer commission, including intense combat water survival training. All cadets are required to certify they are capable swimmers before going to the Leaders Development and Assessment Course and completing water confidence training.

    At their recent Combat Water Survival Training on March 2 with the Bison Battalion at Bucknell University, cadets performed a 15-minute continuous swim, five minutes of treading water, an equipment ditch upon dropping into the water, a 15-meter swim with a rubber rifle and a blindfolded 3 meter drop from the high-dive.

    In addition, BU cadets completed land navigation training on upper campus on Feb. 23 where they were tested on their ability to correctly locate coordinated points on a map during daylight and at night. This training followed a day spent at Bushy Creek Battlefield for the cadets’ annual Command Staff Ride — a requirement for commission in the Army, where cadets are exposed to a step-by-step explanation of a battle.

    Student media group networks in NYC

    BUnowMembers of BUnow, the university’s student online news portal, travelled to New York City on March 10 to 12 for the annual College Media Convention. While there, the group was able to present BUnow, as well as attend many panels by some prestigious speakers. The members had an unforgettable time networking with others, as well as bonding as a team together.

    (L-R) Sean Roth, Jackie Beltrami, Kristen Rinaldi, Lindsay George, Jennifer Rinaldi, Zoe Baldwin, Katie Hochgertel, Danielle Columbo, Gabriella O’Grady, Richard Ganahl and Anthony Cucchi. BUnow is a student run online news organization that covers the latest news and events in Bloomsburg, in Pennsylvania and around the world.

    Students explore the small business world

    APICS Student Chapter BU’s APICS Student Chapter took a tour of Weaver Models on March 13. Weaver Models designs and assembles model trains for the serious collector. Operating in an industry that has seen its market shrink and is occupied by bigger players, Weaver Models has spent more than four decades providing top-quality products. Particularly interesting is that Weaver Models is the last of the model train manufacturers to make most of their products here in the United States.

    Students were treated to an extensive tour of the facility by Joe Hayter, president and owner of Weaver Models Hayter showed the manufacturing process and discussed his company’s supply chain, a chain that consists of local companies in Selinsgrove and New Jersey and foreign companies in Asia. Students found it interesting that Weaver Models purchases the electronics for their trains from its competitor and the market leader, Lionel LLC.

    Students related much of what they learned on the trip to what they learned in classes. Because of Weaver’s small revenue base, many of the issues really hit home for students. For example, Hayter told how he can’t afford to have personnel stationed in China to look for suppliers like his competitors do. He also discussed the importance of excellent planning and the potential impact of a failed product launch. For example, he said a mold to make a steam engine costs about $150,000 plus the design work adds another $20,000 or so. He has to anticipate one to two years ahead of time whether he’ll be able to sell enough product to justify that kind of investment. The 12 people who work at Weaver Models depend on him to make savvy business decisions.

    Counseling and Student Affairs attends national conference

    Counseling and Student Affairs Students and faculty from BU’s Counseling and Student Affairs (CSA) program recently attended the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) conference in Orlando, Florida.

    (L-R) Mark Bauman, CSA program coordinator; Daniel Sterowski, graduate student; Alli Downs, academic advisor for Penn State Global Campus and BU alumna from the CSA program; Ryan Geiger, CSA graduate student; and Denise Davidson, CSA program faculty. Jen Hunsinger, associate director of residence life, and Dione Somerville, vice president of student affairs, also attended at the NASPA conference. NASPA is one of two professional associations for student affairs practitioners.

    The CSA program provides a balance of academic and theorectical learning with application through classroom and practical instruction from core faculty and current professionals in the school counseling and college student affairs fields. The M.Ed. degree can be earned in two years as a full-time student or three years through the part-time program. Students may begin the graduate program in the fall, spring or summer semester. Coursework generally involves 9 to 12 credits per term, depending on a student's sequence.

    African Journeys: An Exhibition of Photography

    Africa Study Abroad Please join us for the exhibit reception and selected readings by BU students on Wednesday, March 13, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Haas Center for the Arts. Readings by students participating in the Cameroon Ethiopia Study Abroad Program Spring Semester 2013 will be at 11:30 a.m. This exhibit presents a selection of photographs made by BU students who participated in the Spring Semester Study Abroad Program in Cameroon and Ethiopia January 2013.

    The course, "Photography in the Field: Working in a non-Western Culture," introduced students to challenges of making photographs as unfamiliar people and places with both respect and sensitivity. The exhibition will be on view from March 2 to 31. Contact Ekema Agbaw at sagbaw@bloomu.edu or Vera Viditz-Ward at vviditz@bloomu.edu for more information.

    SAM hosts Domino's entrepreneur

    Society for Advancement of Management BU's Society for Advancement of Management had an incredible guest speaker on Monday, Nov. 26, visit campus to share his experiences. Paul Dutton, of Danville, to share his experiences on being a successful entrepreneur. His presentation had a large turnout, and Dutton’s experiences had the whole classroom truly intrigued. He had a rather impressive resume as a member of the U.S. Army and put it all behind him to take a risk. This risk nonetheless has turned him into a very successful member of the Domino’s Pizza franchise.

    Every member of SAM’s group and all attendees have taken various valuable lessons from Dutton, including fighting for your goals in life, even if those goals involve taking an unimaginable risk. Overall, Dutton stressed fighting for what you believe in and doing whatever possible to make ends meet. In addition, his beliefs in customer service and reliability prove that proper business strategies will set you apart from others. His presence was a valuable asset to SAM’s organization and his stories and accomplishments were extremely beneficial.

    Activist to talk truth and reconciliation

    Naomi Tutu Naomi Tutu, race and gender justice activist, will discuss, "Truth and Reconciliation: Healing the Wounds of Racism," on Tuesday, March 12, at 6 p.m. in the Haas Center for the Arts, presented by the Multicultural Center. Tutu is the third child of Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Nomalizo Leah Tutu. The challenges of growing up black and female in apartheid South Africa have been the foundation of Nontombi Naomi Tutu's life as an activist for human rights. Those experiences taught her that our whole human family loses when we accept situations of oppression, and how the teaching and preaching of hate and division injure us all. In her speeches she blends this passion for human dignity with humor and personal stories.

    Whether in personal life or in the larger society, we have wounds that block our ability to be the wonderful gifts that we are meant to be in the world. We too have inflicted wounds unto others, but all these wounds can be healed. However, it takes courage and the willingness to speak and hear the truth. That first step to healing is so often the hardest. We are afraid to speak our truth for fear of judgment, rejection and anger. We are also afraid to hear truths that might question our images of ourselves. Yet the pain is only the first step, what comes after that is healing and wholeness. Using South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission as a starting place and model, Tutu will talk about how we can heal and be healed as individuals and a society. #SpeakerSeries

    National TRiO Day Recognition

    TRIO Student Support Services According to the 1986 Congressional resolution, National TRIO Day is meant to focus the nation's "attention on the needs of disadvantaged young people and adults aspiring to improve their lives, to the necessary investment if they are to become contributing citizens of the country, and to the talent which will be wasted if that investment is not made."

    TRIO Student Support Services and TRIO Upward Bound at Bloomsburg University celebrated National TRIO Day by hosting an Open House on Feb. 28 in the Warren Student Services Center atrium. TRiO's mission is to contribute to the success of BU students in pursuit of their educational career and life goals. TRiO is committed to increasing retention and graduation through:

    • Personalized supportive, proficient and accessible program services and staff
    • Quality advising, tutoring, teaching and advocacy
    • Acknowledgement and appreciation for individual diversity and resilience

    A first-hand lesson on politics at The United Nations

    International Law and Organizations Twenty-three students from BU’s International Law and Organizations class took a field trip to The United Nations Headquarters and The United States Mission to the United Nations in New York City on March 4. In the morning, students participated in the one-hour guided tour at the United Nations Headquarters. They also personally observed the first-day meeting of the United Nations Women’s Commission Annual Session at UN General Assembly.

    Students have gained the first-hand knowledge on how the United Nations, the centerpiece of global governance, has dealt with many security, economic, social, and environmental issues. In the afternoon, students visited The United States Mission to The United Nations. Two American diplomats gave students one-hour briefing on the structure and operations of their institution as well as the United States Foreign Service.

    They also answered many questions on various foreign policy issues and pursuing a career in Foreign Service. The students have gained better understanding of the role of the United States in global governance. This eye-opening field trip is a very worthwhile educational event. The field trip was supported by the College of Liberal Arts Curricular Enhancement Fund.

    A Conversation on World Religions

    A Conversation on World Religions Jeffery Long, professor of religion and Asian studies at Elizabethtown College, will speak on Buddhism: Origins, Philosophy and Practice at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 12, in BU’s Hartline Science Center, Kuster Auditorium. Long completed his doctoral degree at the University of Chicago in the year 2000 and is the author of three books–A Vision for Hinduism: Beyond Hindu Nationalism (I.B. Tauris, 2007), Jainism: An Introduction (I.B. Tauris, 2009), and The Historical Dictionary of Hinduism (Rowman and Littlefield, 2011).

    He is currently working on a two-volume set for I.B. Tauris–Indian Philosophy: An Introduction and Indian Philosophy: The Essential Read- ings. Long has traveled extensively in both India and Japan and approaches the teaching of both Hinduism and Buddhism from the perspective of a scholar and a practitioner. The lecture, part of BU’s Conversation on World Religions, is open to the public free of charge. For information, contact Nawal Bonomo, assistant to the dean, College of Liberal Arts, at nbonomo@bloomu.edu.

    Upcoming Speaker: Anna Dolidze

    Anna Dolidze Anna Dolidze, a visiting assistant professor of law at the University of Western Ontario, will present, "Globalization, Criminalization and Protest: the Case of Georgia," on Monday, March 11, at 7 p.m. in Carver Hall’s Gross Auditorium. By looking at the processes within the Former-Soviet Georgia, the talk examines the relationship between globalization, criminalization and protest semantics. The talk shows how the global rise of governance through crime as a popular ideology for dealing with social insecurity, shapes the political agenda of a country facing challenges of economic development. The politics of incarceration emerges at the center contention, as aggravated population uses bifurcated bilingual protest semantics, in English and in Georgian, to address their grievances to the nation-state government as well as reach global elites.

    Dolidze teaches public international law and property, law, and development. She is also a Joachim Herz Fellow at the Transatlantic Academy of German Marshall Fund, working within a multi-disciplinary research group towards the Academy’s annual theme: The Future of the Western Liberal Order. Dolidze has published in international law journals, peer-reviewed publications and collected volumes. Anna has also authored reports for a number of international organizations, including the United Nations Development Program and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. Dolidze's teaching and research interests include property law and theory, the intersection of constitutional law and immigration law, and international law.

    Academic Internships: A look inside Washington

    The Washington Center Ten BU students participated in the 2013 Presidential Inauguration Seminar sponsored by The Washington Center. Come experience a once-in-a-lifetime look into the inner workings of our nation’s capitol on Wednesday, March 6, at 6 p.m. in Andruss Library’s Schweiker Room. Witness the perspectives of BU students who had the opportunity to be part of this historical event during one of the most polarized points in our nation’s history. Learn about:
    • The “why” behind polarization
    • The fourth pillar of government
    • Evolution of our Congress
    • Changing role of government
    • Role of the media in politics
    • The polarizing issues today/li>
    • Numbers behind the problems

    Act of intolerance sparks a tour of empowerment

    Erin Davies Erin Davies will tell her story on Friday, March 8, at noon in Columbia Hall 119, where she will be joined by her rainbow VW Beetle from 9:30 to 11:45 a.m. and 1 to 2 p.m. at the Student Services Center. On April 18, 2007, her Volkswagen Beetle was tagged with the words "fag" and "u r gay" on the driver's side and hood of her car. Rather than get it fixed, she decided to embrace what happened by keeping the graffiti on her car for one year to evoke a dialogue with the general public about homophobia. Not only did she want America to see the spray painted words, she wanted help with a solution.

    Davies planned a 58-day cross-country trip in her car now known worldwide as the "Fagbug" and produced an award winning documentary about the adventure that is now on Netflix, itunes, Hulu, and in libraries all around the country. After driving the car for a year, she decided to give the car a makeover. She now tour with her rainbow Volkswagen Beetle speaking at Universities across North America. She's been to more than 150 schools to bring awareness about hate crimes and to confront homophobia. Her visit to campus is sponsored by BU's LGBTA Commission and Resource Center.

    Women's Day of Dialogue: Embracing Real Beauty

    Stacey Nadeau BU's annual Women's Day of Dialogue will be held on Saturday, March 9, at 11 a.m. in honor of National Women's History Month with guest speaker, Stacey Nadaeu, who will deliver an inspiring message about her journey as a plus size mode, and how she overcame the backlash from society. Nadaeu challenges the audience to question the real meaning of beauty for both men and women, and have them begin to think of ways they can be catalysts for change. Following her presentation there will be time for questions and answers and a roundtable discussion to further dissect the topics of body image, self-esteem, and what it means to be a woman in today's society!

    Stacy Nadeau is a brave Dove "Real Woman" who stood proudly along with 5 other women in her underwear in the summer of 2005 as part of the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty. This campaign and the “Real Women” ads which celebrated the diversity of body shapes and sizes generated national attention when they hit billboards from coast to coast. Stacy and the other women truly brought the mission of the Campaign for Real Beauty to life which is to make more women feel beautiful everyday by widening today’s stereotypical view of beauty and inspiring women to take great care of themselves. Please RSVP your attendance at the Women's Resource Center at (570) 389-5283 or stwoman@bloomu.edu. #SpeakerSeries

    FOCUS ministry visits campus

    Bethel Deliverance International BU’s Office of Minority Affairs is hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, March 10, at 10:45 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Free breakfast at 10:15 a.m. Come be part of the service! There will be a shuttle bus on a continuous loop to pick up students who live on upper campus from 9:45 to 11 a.m. Contact Marcei Woods at (570) 389-4091 for more information.

    Social media app not as secretive as you think

    Recently, the university has become aware of a new app, Erodr, being used by our students. Some of the postings on this app have already been viewed by university officials.

    Erodr Even though apps and websites such as Facebook claim that information is anonymous, private, or automatically deleted it can be accessed, seen in ways not intended, or is never completely deleted from the internet and electronic devices. Digital forensics faculty have confirmed this. This information can have serious consequences for students through the university judicial process, in criminal proceedings, in graduate student admission processes, or in future employment.

    Think about your future when posting on social media.

    Campus Master Plan Update: Phase 2 Overview

    Campus Master Plan Phase 2 of the campus master plan is drawing to a close. Since January, the team walked through campus facilities, surveying and documenting their conditions. Targeted buildings’ physical and functional conditions were evaluated to help us understand if the buildings are accessible, if code or safety issues exist, if spaces support how facilities are used, and how the buildings’ interior finishes and exterior materials are holding up.

    Overall the results confirm that most of the campus and its buildings are in generally good condition. Kehr Union, University Bookstore, Old Science, McCormick, Montour Hall, Buckingham Maintenance Center, and Schuylkill Hall are some potential locations for renovation or replacement. A space utilization analysis for learning environments was also completed. Primary findings illustrate efficiencies across the board for classrooms and class labs. In order to accommodate growth, additional classroom facilities will likely be required for some programs in the near term.

    Next Steps: Phase 2 will conclude with a parking study and infrastructure review, and Phase 3 is now in full force. In this part of the process, the team will develop campus signage and wayfinding ideas along with possible sustainability strategies. Data from Phase 2 will be combined with larger possibilities for change identified to date, helping the team develop broader concepts as possible solutions for campus growth. Cost estimates for these solutions will also be generated for consideration, adding reality to each project identified.

    Staying Connected: Project updates are posted regularly on Facebook, Bloomsburg Campus Plan 2013. You can also follow #BUCampusPlan on Twitter. If you have a question, thought, or idea to share, email Mary Prout at mprou3@bloomu.edu.

    Now THIS is an internship opportunity

    Applications are being accepted for PASSHE’s annual The Harrisburg Internship Program (THIS), which involves students in the public policy practice. THIS provides an important and enriching academic experience. Students learn the dynamics of state government in new and powerful ways through direct involvement in report and speech writing, research, and program design and evaluation. In turn, policy makers benefit from the fresh points of view of these outstanding students.
    Gabrielle Vielhauer
    Gabrielle Vielhauer, THIS '12
    • earn a total of 15 semester credit hours
    • receive a paid $6,500 stipend from PASSHE
    • each applicant must have maintained at least a 3.0 grade point average in a minimum of 45 undergraduate credit hours at the time of application
    • all majors invited to apply!

    Contact Nancy Gentile Ford, campus THIS coordinator, at (570) 389-4164 for more information, including application form. Application, references, writing sample, and resume due by March 15.

    Anthropology major completes state Historic Preservation Office internship

    My name is Gabrielle Vielhauer. I am a student at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania where I am studying anthropology. From September to December 2012, I was pleased to be selected to participate in The Harrisburg Intern Semester (THIS) program sponsored by the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). This program places one student representative from each university, within the state system, with an office of the legislature or in a government agency.

    3-D art comes to life at Haas Gallery exhibit

    Carlie Trosclair Installation art grabs the spotlight during an opening reception for an exhibit by Carlie Trosclair on Thursday, Feb. 21, from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. at Haas Gallery of Art. The works will remain on display through March 15. Winner of the St. Louis Riverfront Times Mastermind Award, Trosclair creates art that alters the sense of place. She draws from architecture and uses basic tools like textiles, wallpaper and furniture to create art that explores new worlds.

    Trosclair, who lives and works in St. Louis, Mo., recently attended residencies at Vermont Studio Center and Woodside Contemporary Artists Center in New York. She earned a Master of Fine Arts from the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Loyola University in New Orleans. Trosclair is a fellow of the Community Arts Training Institute and collaborative teaching artist-in-residence at Rebuild Foundation, both in Missouri. For more information, contact gallery associate Rebecca Morgan, rmorgan@bloomu.edu. The Haas Gallery of Art is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from noon until 2 p.m. The gallery is closed on Sundays and university holidays. The reception is open to the public and free of charge. @haasgallery

    NSSE seeks opinions of freshmen, seniors

    Each member of BU’s first-year and senior classes is invited to share opinions about his or her experiences at BU by completing the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). According to Sheila Dove Jones, director of BU’s planning and assessment office, answers to the online survey will reveal students’ views on the quality of their education and their level of involvement in activities outside of the classroom. Results will be used to improve the undergraduate experience and as a baseline measurement for BU’s new general education requirements that took effect in fall 2012.

    National Survey of Student Engagement Jones said several email messages containing a link to the survey will be sent to BU’s freshmen and seniors. She encourages students to respond by Tuesday, March 26.

    In appreciation for participating, students who complete the survey by May 1 will be automatically entered in a random drawing to win one of six $50 gift cards or one of 20 Bloomsburg University prizes worth $10 or more. A student’s chance of winning depends on how many students complete the survey. The last time this survey was administered, about 800 students responded. Based on this estimate, odds of winning are 1 in 31. Take the survey online at www.nssesurvey.org.

    Approximately 3,900 BU students have been invited to participate. A total of 546 U.S. colleges and universities and 285,000 first-year students and seniors participated in the 2012 survey. For more information, contact Jones at (570) 389-4027 or sjones@bloomu.edu.

    BU represented at Black Conference on Higher Education Conference

    PA Education Conference A group of BU students and university administrators recently participated in the annual PA Black Conference on Higher Education Conference (PABCOHE) at the ACE Conference Center in Lafayette Hills. Those in attendance included Ira Blake, provost and senior VP of academic affairs; George Agbango, chair of mass communications; Irvin Wright, acting associate dean of academic achievement; and six graduate students who were supported by Act 101/EOP and the Office of Diversity and Retention.

    The conference theme was “43 Years and Holding Strong: Continuing our Advocacy for Inclusion in Higher Education.” Blake and Wright were featured panelists during plenary sessions, CEO Forum and Town Hall Meeting respectively. Agbango was formerly President of PABCOHE and currently serves on the Executive Council. (L-R) Rubin Rhodes, Benjamin Moyer, Iesha Fitzgerald, Wright, Blake, Agbango, Stacey Garcia, Christopher McClain, Brittany Kelly.

    BU-Chamber Networking Reception

    BU-Chamber Networking Reception Nearly 90 students and 30 Columbia-Montour Chamber of Commerce members attended the inaugural BU-Chamber Networking Reception on Tuesday, Feb. 26, co-sponsored by the Office of Academic Internships and the Columbia-Montour Chamber of Commerce. Panelists from Kawneer Manufacturing, Geisinger, Autoneum, Press-Enterprise, and Kydex discussed the following special topics: How to Communicate with Employers, Internship Employer Expectations, Resume building, Interviewing Tips, From Internship to Career and Appropriate Workplace behavior.

    During the networking portion of the event, the panelists talked with students about internships and employer internship expectations. Students were also able to talk with regional organizations about new summer internship opportunities. Some of the organizations represented were MetroCast Communications, Innotek Computer consulting, First Keystone Community Bank, Service 1st Federal Credit Union, Montour County Transit and Courthouse among others.

      “More students should come to events like this. Students don’t realize how hard it is to get jobs and internships and this had great information!”

      “I talked with the Chamber and was able to get the contact information for a Chamber internship in a metropolitan area which is what I was hoping to do this summer.”

      “I learned some good suggestions about what to expect in an interview. Some of what the panelists discussed gave me a better understanding of what to expect.”

    Doggin’ Around on Service Day

    Phi Beta Lambda Service, education, and progress are the three points within the Phi Beta Lambda mission. As future business leaders, there are many opportunities to accomplish this mission, and Saturday, Feb. 16 was no exception. Feb. 16 was the Phi Beta Lambda, or PBL, National Day of Service, and five members dedicated their day to the Danville SPCA.

    “I was not quite sure what to expect when arriving at the SPCA,” recalls one of the volunteers, Alyssa Long, “I admit I had some stereotypical thoughts in my head that they (the animals) were going to either be vicious or extremely scared, but I was pleasantly surprised.” Alyssa, a junior marketing major with a minor in management, has always been a fan of animals, and is a huge advocate when it comes to lending a helping hand. “When the opportunity came along to volunteer at the local PSPCA (Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals), I pounced on the sign-up list.”

    “One challenge we faced was trying to control a deaf Pitbull, named Hiro,” remembers Elena Alfano, a freshman management and accounting major. “He was so excited to be walked that we had to put all of our strength into controlling him and calming him down.” Along with walking the dogs, the group of students was also able to play with and groom the cats, and simply give love to the animals in need. “Seeing the dogs and cats interact with us, I couldn’t help but wonder why they hadn’t been adopted yet,” gushes Alyssa, who had to fight not taking home several animals herself. “I tried not to think about that too much because it would upset me,” she adds, thinking about all of the loving animals.

    The ASPCA works to rescue animals from abuse, pass humane laws, and share resources with shelters nationwide. If interested in donating time to a local animal shelter or like to adopt an animal in need, visit aspca.org. Written by By Carol Bachman, of Phi Beta Lambda

    Career Development: Networking prior to graduation

    CPEC Job and Internship Fair A group of students with BU's Career Development Center recently attended the CPEC Job and Internship Fair in Camp Hill. More than 80 organizations such as Capital Blue Cross, Trifecta Technologies, CCRES Educational and Behavioral Health Services recruited candidates at the fair. During the fair students and alumni had the opportunity to explore possible careers, make employer connections, and participate in screening interviews for internships and jobs. (L-R) Kristin Hummel, Chris Flenard, Brittany Devine, Ben Michaelian and Devon Perkins.

    Hummel said a highlight of the experience was, “... being able to take what I learned from school and apply it in a real world situation. It was encouraging to receive positive feedback from potential employers and I am excited for my future.” Hoffman added, “It was a good experience speaking with recruiters face-to-face and having the opportunity to learn more about a variety of companies.”

    BU students Anthony Brophy and Olivia Plantholt each won a $250 wardrobe scholarship donated by Enterprise Holdings and the Central PA Employment Consortium (CPEC). Another upcoming career development event is the North Central PA Education Consortium on April 10 in the Kehr Union, drawing recruiters from schools across the U.S. who are interested in candidates in all teacher certification areas and school administration. The event is open to BU seniors and alumni.

    TriBeta gives support to biology research

    TriBeta BU’s student chapter of TriBeta, national biology honor society, recently donated $250 to the Donald Rabb Research Fund at the BU Foundation, which supports undergraduate research in biology. (L-R) Jerome Dvorak, executive director of the BU Foundation; George Chamuris, chairperson of the Department of Biological and Allied Health Sciences; Stephen Taylor, president of TriBeta; vice president of TriBeta, Jessica Willis; secretary of TriBeta, Stephen Paliswiat, treasurer of TriBeta; and James Redinski, historian of TriBeta. Missing from the photo is secretary Jessica Fisher.

    Beta Beta Beta (TriBeta) is a society for students, particularly undergraduates, dedicated to improving the understanding and appreciation of biological study and extending boundaries of human knowledge through scientific research. Since its founding in 1922, more than 200,000 persons have been accepted into lifetime membership, and more than 553 chapters have been established throughout the United States and Puerto Rico.

    Forensics Team showcases talent at Wilkes tourney

    BU’s Forensics Team won eight speaking and debate awards at the recent Collegiate Forensic Association's Harold Cox Speech and Debate Tournament at Wilkes University. In order to emphasize the educational component of competitive speaking and debate, team sweepstakes trophies were not awarded at this event. BU students competed against eight other schools in winning the following individual and debate awards:
      Speech and Debate
    • James Neff — 2nd Place, Extemporaneous Speaking; 5th Place, Impromptu Speaking; 6th Place, Persuasive Speaking, and 2nd Place Parliamentary Debate with Zach Moore.
    • John Munchel — 4th Place, Extemporaneous Speaking; 4th Place Dramatic Duo with Stephanie Kaminski.
    • Cortney Fenton—- 5th Place, Prose Interpretation; 5th Place, Persuasive Speaking.
    • Zach Moore — 2nd place, Parliamentary Debate with James Neff.
    • Stephanie Kaminski — 4th Place Dramatic Duo with John Munchel.

    Chelsea Lucas and Joshua Hooks also competed for Bloomsburg University. Neil Strine, director of Forensics, and Jaqueline Bavier, graduate student in Counseling, served as judges for the event. The Forensics (Speech and Debate) Team will travel next to the CFA Beach Tournament in Ocean City, Md., during the first weekend in March. The Team meets every Monday in Bakeless 202 at 9 p.m. and interested students should contact Strine at hstrin2@bloomu.edu for more information. All BU students are welcome to join and no prior experience is necessary.

    Freshmen explore history of Holocaust in Washington, D.C.

    First Year Seminar 101 Students in the First Year Seminar 101, The Holocaust through Hollywood's Eyes, toured the permanent exhibit of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on Feb. 16, joined by a small number of students from the History of Holocaust course. They learned more about the history of the Holocaust and pondered how this event is taught to an at-large public visiting Washington, D.C.

    First Year Seminars allow students fulfill a general education requirement in communication and information literacy while exploring special interest topics. The First Year Seminar is designed to provide incoming undeclared freshmen students with a self‐selected course experience that supports general education guidelines, namely written communication skills and information literacy.

    BU represented at Black Conference on Higher Education Conference

    PA Education Conference A group of BU students and university administrators recently participated in the annual PA Black Conference on Higher Education Conference (PABCOHE) at the ACE Conference Center in Lafayette Hills. Those in attendance included Ira Blake, provost and senior VP of academic affairs; George Agbango, chair of mass communications; Irvin Wright, acting associate dean of academic achievement; and six graduate students who were supported by Act 101/EOP and the Office of Diversity and Retention.

    The conference theme was “43 Years and Holding Strong: Continuing our Advocacy for Inclusion in Higher Education.” Blake and Wright were featured panelists during plenary sessions, CEO Forum and Town Hall Meeting respectively. Agbango was formerly President of PABCOHE and currently serves on the Executive Council. (L-R) Rubin Rhodes, Benjamin Moyer, Iesha Fitzgerald, Wright, Blake, Agbango, Stacey Garcia, Christopher McClain, Brittany Kelly.

    Academic Internships: A look inside Washington

    The Washington CenterTen BU students participated in the 2013 Presidential Inauguration Seminar sponsored by The Washington Center presented a once-in-a-lifetime look into the inner workings of our nation’s capitol on Wednesday, March 6, in Andruss Library’s Schweiker Room.

    The students discussed government polarization, the history of and the "why" behind polarization, evolution of our congress and presented recommendations to address current issues. (L-R) Abby Moser, Olivia Miller, Samantha Smith, Kimberly Adams, East Stroudsburg University and TWC student advisor Tykirra Robinson, Mat Sullivan, LeDeshia Maxwell, Spencer McHug,h Jimmy Muwombi, Robin Segale, Pete Doerschler, of Bloomsburg University, TWC faculty liaison Matt Kenny.

    Doggin’ Around on Service Day

    Phi Beta Lambda Service, education, and progress are the three points within the Phi Beta Lambda mission. As future business leaders, there are many opportunities to accomplish this mission, and Saturday, Feb. 16 was no exception. Feb. 16 was the Phi Beta Lambda, or PBL, National Day of Service, and five members dedicated their day to the Danville SPCA.

    “I was not quite sure what to expect when arriving at the SPCA,” recalls one of the volunteers, Alyssa Long, “I admit I had some stereotypical thoughts in my head that they (the animals) were going to either be vicious or extremely scared, but I was pleasantly surprised.” Alyssa, a junior marketing major with a minor in management, has always been a fan of animals, and is a huge advocate when it comes to lending a helping hand. “When the opportunity came along to volunteer at the local PSPCA (Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals), I pounced on the sign-up list.”

    “One challenge we faced was trying to control a deaf Pitbull, named Hiro,” remembers Elena Alfano, a freshman management and accounting major. “He was so excited to be walked that we had to put all of our strength into controlling him and calming him down.” Along with walking the dogs, the group of students was also able to play with and groom the cats, and simply give love to the animals in need. “Seeing the dogs and cats interact with us, I couldn’t help but wonder why they hadn’t been adopted yet,” gushes Alyssa, who had to fight not taking home several animals herself. “I tried not to think about that too much because it would upset me,” she adds, thinking about all of the loving animals.

    The ASPCA works to rescue animals from abuse, pass humane laws, and share resources with shelters nationwide. If interested in donating time to a local animal shelter or like to adopt an animal in need, visit aspca.org. Written by By Carol Bachman, of Phi Beta Lambda

    Career Development: Networking prior to graduation

    CPEC Job and Internship Fair A group of students with BU's Career Development Center recently attended the CPEC Job and Internship Fair in Camp Hill. More than 80 organizations such as Capital Blue Cross, Trifecta Technologies, CCRES Educational and Behavioral Health Services recruited candidates at the fair. During the fair students and alumni had the opportunity to explore possible careers, make employer connections, and participate in screening interviews for internships and jobs. (L-R) Kristin Hummel, Chris Flenard, Brittany Devine, Ben Michaelian and Devon Perkins.

    Hummel said a highlight of the experience was, “... being able to take what I learned from school and apply it in a real world situation. It was encouraging to receive positive feedback from potential employers and I am excited for my future.” Hoffman added, “It was a good experience speaking with recruiters face-to-face and having the opportunity to learn more about a variety of companies.”

    BU students Anthony Brophy and Olivia Plantholt each won a $250 wardrobe scholarship donated by Enterprise Holdings and the Central PA Employment Consortium (CPEC). Another upcoming career development event is the North Central PA Education Consortium on April 10 in the Kehr Union, drawing recruiters from schools across the U.S. who are interested in candidates in all teacher certification areas and school administration. The event is open to BU seniors and alumni.

    TriBeta gives support to biology research

    TriBeta BU’s student chapter of TriBeta, national biology honor society, recently donated $250 to the Donald Rabb Research Fund at the BU Foundation, which supports undergraduate research in biology. (L-R) Jerome Dvorak, executive director of the BU Foundation; George Chamuris, chairperson of the Department of Biological and Allied Health Sciences; Stephen Taylor, president of TriBeta; vice president of TriBeta, Jessica Willis; secretary of TriBeta, Stephen Paliswiat, treasurer of TriBeta; and James Redinski, historian of TriBeta. Missing from the photo is secretary Jessica Fisher.

    Beta Beta Beta (TriBeta) is a society for students, particularly undergraduates, dedicated to improving the understanding and appreciation of biological study and extending boundaries of human knowledge through scientific research. Since its founding in 1922, more than 200,000 persons have been accepted into lifetime membership, and more than 553 chapters have been established throughout the United States and Puerto Rico.

    NSSE seeks opinions of freshmen, seniors

    Each member of BU’s first-year and senior classes is invited to share opinions about his or her experiences at BU by completing the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). According to Sheila Dove Jones, director of BU’s planning and assessment office, answers to the online survey will reveal students’ views on the quality of their education and their level of involvement in activities outside of the classroom. Results will be used to improve the undergraduate experience and as a baseline measurement for BU’s new general education requirements that took effect in fall 2012.

    National Survey of Student Engagement In appreciation for participating, students who complete the survey by May 1 will be automatically entered in a random drawing to win one of six $50 gift cards or one of 20 Bloomsburg University prizes worth $10 or more. A student’s chance of winning depends on how many students complete the survey. The last time this survey was administered, about 800 students responded. Based on this estimate, odds of winning are 1 in 31. Take the survey online at www.nssesurvey.org.

    Approximately 3,900 BU students have been invited to participate. A total of 546 U.S. colleges and universities and 285,000 first-year students and seniors participated in the 2012 survey. For more information, contact Jones at (570) 389-4027 or sjones@bloomu.edu.

    Forensics Team showcases talent at Wilkes tourney

    BU’s Forensics Team won eight speaking and debate awards at the recent Collegiate Forensic Association's Harold Cox Speech and Debate Tournament at Wilkes University. In order to emphasize the educational component of competitive speaking and debate, team sweepstakes trophies were not awarded at this event. BU students competed against eight other schools in winning the following individual and debate awards:
      Speech and Debate
    • James Neff — 2nd Place, Extemporaneous Speaking; 5th Place, Impromptu Speaking; 6th Place, Persuasive Speaking, and 2nd Place Parliamentary Debate with Zach Moore.
    • John Munchel — 4th Place, Extemporaneous Speaking; 4th Place Dramatic Duo with Stephanie Kaminski.
    • Cortney Fenton—- 5th Place, Prose Interpretation; 5th Place, Persuasive Speaking.
    • Zach Moore — 2nd place, Parliamentary Debate with James Neff.
    • Stephanie Kaminski — 4th Place Dramatic Duo with John Munchel.

    Chelsea Lucas and Joshua Hooks also competed for Bloomsburg University. Neil Strine, director of Forensics, and Jaqueline Bavier, graduate student in Counseling, served as judges for the event. The Forensics (Speech and Debate) Team will travel next to the CFA Beach Tournament in Ocean City, Md., during the first weekend in March. The Team meets every Monday in Bakeless 202 at 9 p.m. and interested students should contact Strine at hstrin2@bloomu.edu for more information. All BU students are welcome to join and no prior experience is necessary.

    Freshmen explore history of Holocaust in Washington, D.C.

    First Year Seminar 101 Students in the First Year Seminar 101, The Holocaust through Hollywood's Eyes, toured the permanent exhibit of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on Feb. 16, joined by a small number of students from the History of Holocaust course. They learned more about the history of the Holocaust and pondered how this event is taught to an at-large public visiting Washington, D.C.

    First Year Seminars allow students fulfill a general education requirement in communication and information literacy while exploring special interest topics. The First Year Seminar is designed to provide incoming undeclared freshmen students with a self‐selected course experience that supports general education guidelines, namely written communication skills and information literacy.

    Campus Alert: March 17, 2013

    Update March 25, 4:30 p.m.: Samuel Jeannot, a student involved in the March 17 robbery on East Third Street, turned himself in to Bloomsburg Town Police today, March 25, accompanied by his family. He will be charged with robbery, robbery with the intent to cause bodily injuries, aggravated assault and simple assault. He was arraigned where bail was set at $100,000. His preliminary hearing is scheduled for Wednesday, March 27.

    Update March 18, 5:25 a.m.: A second suspect has been identified in the earlier reported attempted robbery in the 400 block of East Third St. on March 17 at about 9:21 p.m. The suspect is Samuel Andre Jeannot, a 22-year-old black male. He may be armed with a handgun. He is wanted for robbery and assault and should be considered dangerous. He may be operating a Lincoln with Pennsylvania license HTJ-2122. If you know his whereabouts or have any other information regarding this incident call Bloomsburg Town Police at (570) 784-4155.

    Update March 17, 11:05 p.m.: One male suspect is in custody as of 11 p.m. March 17, the other remains at large. The location is updated to outside in the 400 block of E. 3rd St.

    At approximately 9:21 p.m. on Sunday, March 17, 2013, an attempted robbery was reported at 400 E. Third Street. The suspects were described as two black males wearing masks and carrying hand guns. The suspects fled by foot. One fled east on Third Street, while the other fled west on Third. Bloomsburg Town Police are investigating the incident. Any information regarding the identity of these individuals should be provided to the Bloomsburg Police at (570) 784-4155.

    For your safety, there are emergency call boxes available throughout campus. If you are in town and need help, call 911. This campus alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990.

    What will you do this summer?

    Now is the time to plan and apply for summer 2013 Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activities (URSCA) Awards from Bloomsburg University, which supported 28 students with stipends last summer to conduct faculty-mentored projects.

    Past URSCA students continue their incredible professional and personal growth as they extend projects into the academic year, attend professional meetings and present or publish their work in professional venues. The Undergraduate Research Center and Office of Research and Sponsored Programs will offer awards to conduct research, scholarly and creative projects this summer. Stipend support is prorated according to project up to a maximum of $6,000 per 12 weeks at 37.5 hours per week.

    College of Liberal Arts hosts A Taste of the Arts

    Center for Visual and Performing Arts
    An afternoon of free entertainment, A Taste of the Arts, is planned for the Moose Exchange in downtown Bloomsburg, Saturday, Feb. 23, from 2 to 5 p.m. Sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts, the event is organized by BU’s Center for Visual and Performing Arts, which helps to promote the arts in the community.

    Students and faculty in the art and art history, English, and music, theatre and dance departments will showcase their talents in the Moose Exchange. While art exhibitions, theatrical productions, dance performances, recitals and other musical events, all open to the public, are held throughout the academic year, most of these events take place on campus. A Taste of the Arts, now in its second year, brings students’ talents to a central venue for the community to enjoy, said James Brown, dean of the College of Liberal Arts.

    Civil rights leader headlines MLK banquet

    Julian Bond BU’s speaker series continues today with noted civil rights leader Julian Bond, former chairman of the NAACP, who will be the keynote speaker of the 20th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Banquet. Bond will speak on his extensive experience participating in the movements for civil rights and economic justice since his student days at Morehouse College in the early 1960s. Bond, who is also a well-regarded politician, professor and writer, began his activist career by helping to establish the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1960 and then becoming the first president of the Southern Poverty Law Center. As SNCC's communications director, Bond was active in protests and registration campaigns throughout the South. #JulianBond.

    Leeds prof to talk about importance of play

    Fraser Brown Professor Fraser Brown of Leeds Metropolitan University in the United Kingdom will speak about the therapeutic benefits of play for young children and propose a career concentration in playwork for BU’s students when he visits the university next week. The presentation, “An Introduction to the Field of Playwork,” will be offered on Monday, March 4, and Tuesday, March 5, at 6:30 p.m. in Hartline Science Center G38 and is open to the public free of charge. Brown will discuss how the opportunity to play benefits the development of a child. The essence of play, he said, is that “we work to the child’s agenda. Most other adults who work with children bring an adult’s agenda.”

    An Introduction to the Field of Playwork: Brown will introduce the audience to the field of playwork, a well-respected profession throughout the world with a strong presence in Europe, Scandinavia, and Japan. The playwork profession is rooted in the belief that play is of immense benefit, and that society has a responsibility to ensure children get the most out of their play. As modern society continues to restrict opportunities for children to play freely, the field of playwork resists this trend by advancing the right of children to experience play in a variety of forms. Brown will also discuss the proposed playwork career concentration via an international collaboration between Bloomsburg University and Leeds Metropolitan University in the United Kingdom. #SpeakerSeries

    Social media expert to discuss online presence

    Dawn Edmiston Dawn Edmiston will discuss “Developing POP! A Professional Online Presence” on Tuesday, March 5, at 10 a.m. in Sutliff Hall 102 and at 3 p.m. in Hartline Science Center's Kuster Auditorium. The “Developing POP!” approach leverages social media to build a personal brand and a powerful advantage in the current competitive market environment. After hearing from her students at Saint Vincent College that traditional career search methods no longer seemed to be effective, Edmiston sought to teach students how the social media networks that they used in their personal lives could also be powerful tools in their professional lives. The resulting ten-step process emphasizes how to establish a personal brand, develop compelling content, engage audiences and measure the impact of social media efforts.

    Edmiston has 20-plus years of marketing experience in the consulting, education and media sectors. She has served in management roles with Discovery Channel, IBM and PricewaterhouseCoopers, and has also taught at Howard University, Johns Hopkins University, Trinity College and West Virginia University. Edmiston received the 2011 Marketing Management Association AxcessCapon Teaching Innovation Award and the 2012 MAACBA Innovation in Teaching Prize. #SpeakerSeries

    ABC executive reveals future of TV

    Rebecca Campbell A BU alumna, now president of the ABC-Owned Television Group, will share her observations on “The Future of TV,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 27, in BU’s Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium. The lecture by Rebecca Campbell ’83 is open to the public free of charge.

    “For decades, television could be watched only one way — through the television set — and audiences had a choice of three channels,” Campbell said. “Today, consumers have as many as 17 media platforms from which to choose, from video game consoles and MP3 players to smart phones and tablets. We will look at how networks are adapting to this fragmented and rapidly changing market.”

    Campbell, appointed president of the ABC-Owned Television Stations Group in May 2010, is responsible for the company’s local TV stations in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Houston, Raleigh-Durham and Fresno. Based in Burbank, Calif., she also oversees other businesses within the group, including ABC National Television Sales, The Live Well Network and the syndicated series, “Live with Kelly and Michael.” #SpeakerSeries

    Speaking Math in Spanish: A South American Roadtrip

    Paul Loomis Speaking Math in Spanish: A South American Roadtrip will be presented by Paul Loomis, associate professor of mathematics, computer science and statistics, on Monday, Feb. 25, at 4:30 p.m. in SSC 004. Loomis spent six months last year traveling in Peru, Bolivia, Argentina and Chile, visiting universities, giving colloquium talks, sitting in on classes, and talking with students, faculty, and administrators. In this ICS sponsored lecture, Loomis will use insights from his trip to discuss how cultural, economic, and political factors affect university life. Neither knowledge of mathematics nor Spanish are necessary to understand this talk. This is open free to the public. Light refreshments will be served. #SpeakerSeries

    A Conversation on World Religions

    A Conversation on World Religions Ian Wendt, assistant professor of history, will speak on One God, Many Gods: Diverse Hindu Paths at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21, in McCormick Center 1303. The lecture, part of BU’s Conversation on World Religions, is open to the public free of charge. Wendt researches and teaches about the history and cultures of India, Southeast Asia and the Muslim World in Asia. His research on the social and economic history of South India focuses on cotton textile industry and the communities it engendered. That research has taken him to archives in India and the Netherlands. He is currently teaching courses on the History of the Muslim World and Asian Civilizations. For more information, contact Nawal Bonomo, assistant to the dean, College of Liberal Arts, at nbonomo@bloomu.edu. #SpeakerSeries

    Campus Alert: Saturday, Feb. 16

    Bloomsburg Town Police are investigating a reported rape in a house in the 300 block of Lightstreet Road, adjacent to campus, at approximately 1:30 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 16 (today). The woman went to the suspect’s house where she reported she was raped in the suspect’s bedroom. The suspect is described as a black male known as “Mo,” who is 6 feet tall with short black hair. The exact location of the incident is unknown.

    Bloomsburg Town Police are investigating the incident. Any information regarding suspect should be provided to the Bloomsburg Police at (570) 784-4155. Always be aware of your surroundings. If you are in town and need help, call 911. This campus alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990.

    The Washington Center

    Students attend presidential inauguration

    More than 400 college students from across the country, including 10 Bloomsburg University students, descended on the nation’s capital last week for the The Washington Center’s Inauguration Seminar — a two-week program where students and faculty participate in a series of discussions, site visits and guest lectures culminating with Monday’s public inauguration events and swearing-in ceremony.

    Presidential Inauguration Throughout the past week students heard inauguration staff, political leaders and White House news correspondents share personal stories of presidential campaigns, elections and national policy. Historians and renowned professors also hosted interactive discussions on political appointments, congressional confirmations and policy agendas. A few of the speakers included Ken Walsh, chief White House correspondent for U.S. News & World Report; Scott Horsley, White House correspondent for National Public Radio; Janet Hook, political reporter for The Wall Street Journal; Brian Lamb, founder of C-SPAN; and Eugene Kang, special projects coordinator and confidential assistant to the Office of the President.

    Land your dream internship or job!

    Webinar Looking for that dream internship or the perfectly fit job? BU’s Office of Academic Internships and Community Engagement will be hosting a webinar on Tuesday, Feb. 5, from 2 to 3 p.m. at Bakeless 005 to highlight numerous internships and jobs available to students and soon-to-be graduates throughout the federal government. The webinar will also show students how to research, find and apply for an internship or job that best suits them. Contact academic internships at (570) 389-4923 for details.

    Mobile app provides “on the go” access

    Mobile App

    Bloomsburg University has officially gone mobile. Online users can now access many key features of the university website, including BOLT course information and Andruss Library Labstats, easily from their mobile device.

    Bloomsburg Mobile is available for free on iTunes for Apple devices and Google Play for Android devices. Users can stay on top of their course information and view the latest announcements and event occurring across campus, as well as keep up with Huskies athletics, check computer lab availability and access the university directory.

    Chefs strike gold at ARAMARK competition

    Jesse Reeves
    Jesse Reeves, a chef at BU, was among the chefs who won the ACE Bronze Metal in the annual ARAMARK Culinary Excellence competition last month in Orlando, Fla., featuring 30 chefs from 18 regional competitions. The chefs were divided into 10 three-member teams and given 30 minutes to create a menu and three hours to fully execute an appetizer, entrée and dessert that included items from a mystery basket of local Orlando ingredients.

    Certified master chefs from the American Culinary Federation judged the competition and scored finalists on a number of elements to include culinary skills, flavor, plate presentation, use of ingredients and food safety. Reeves was joined by Ed Nagy, of New York University, and John Peralta, of New York University.

    Forensics Team among the best

    Forensics Team BU’s Forensic (Speech and Debate) Team was second out of 11 schools at the Collegiate Forensic Association’s Winter Tournament held at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel in Montreal on Jan. 25 to 26. Sixteen students competed at the tournament with eight winning 15 speaking awards:
    • Dan Clark (team president) — 3rd place, Prose; 3rd Place, Poetry; 3rd Place, Single Dramatic Interp; 4th Place, Impromptu Speaking
    • John Munchel — 1st Place, Declamation; 5th Place, Extemporaneous Speaking; 6th Place, Dramatic Duo Interpretation with Stephanie Kaminski
    • Stephanie Kaminski — 3rd Place, Declamation; 6th Place Speaker Award in Parliamentary Debate; 6th Place Parliamentary Debate with Joshua Hooks
    • Cortney Fenton — 1st Place, Persuasive Speaking; 5th Place, Informative Speaking
    • Sydney Hare — 5th Place, Single Dramatic Interpretation
    • Dan Lacca — 5th Place, Communication Analysis
    • James Neff — 1st Place, After Dinner Speaking
    • Joshua Hooks — 6th Place, Parliamentary Debate with Stephanie Kaminski

    Other students competing included Zach Moore, Jackson Staples, Samantha Morgan, Betsy Rubio, Michael Feiertag, Ashley Feariheller, David Yael, and Maxwell Charles. Erika Mohr, a 2012 graduate and Ryan Geiger, an alumnus and current graduate student, participated in the tournament as speech and debate judges for the BU team. Harry C. “Neil” Strine IV, director of forensics, also served as a speech and debate judge at the tournament.

    BU’s Speech and Debate Team will travel to Wilkes University on Feb. 8 to 9 for their next speech tournament. The team meets every Monday at 9 p.m. in Bakeless 202. All interested students are invited to join the team. No prior experience is necessary. Contact Neil Strine at hstrin2@bloomu.edu for more information.

    CCM on mission in Haiti over break

    Catholic Campus Ministry Nine students representing BU’s Catholic Campus Ministry spent a week, Jan. 11 to 18, over winter break helping Foundation for Peace continue its earthquake relief mission in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, which was devastated by a 7.0 quake in 2010. There, they assisted a local vocational school in teaching and helped renovate damaged buildings and the landscape, as well as spending a day at a local orphanage.

    Daily the students traveled about an hour to a vocational school to help adult students with English and Spanish and conducted various projects, including sanding and painting the wrought-iron windows, painting the inside and outside of the school building and helping to dig a massive trench. The students also had the chance to take a break from the manual labor and teach in both the English and Spanish classrooms, which was an experience they truly enjoyed! #HuskyUnleashed

    Middle East foreign policy expert visits BU

    Trita Parsi Trita Parsi, founder and president of the National Iranian American Council, was among many distinguished guest speakers to visit BU last semester. Parsi discussed President Barack Obama’s diplomacy with Iran on Nov. 28 to a full campus audience in Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium and then was featured on WKOK's Roundtable series with Mark Lawrence, where he said he is hopeful the U.S. and Iran someday find a peaceful solution to the stalemate. He said he fully understands something needs to be done to keep Iran from introducing more nuclear weapons, but war is not the answer.

    BU’s speaker series continues this spring with more distinguished guests ranging many disciplines, including noted civil rights leader Julian Bond in February. Bond, former chairman of the NAACP, will be the keynote speaker of the 20th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Banquet on Feb. 15 where he will speak on his extensive experience participating in the movements for civil rights and economic justice since his student days at Morehouse College in the early 1960s. Bond, who is also well-regarded politician, professor and writer, began his activist career by helping to establish the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1960 and then becoming the first president of the Southern Poverty Law Center, a public interest law firm based in Montgomery, Ala. As SNCC's communications director, Bond was active in protests and registration campaigns throughout the South.

    Pupils connect with Africa Study Abroad

    Reading Day In December, students in Patricia Wetzel's fourth grade class at St. Joseph School in Danville participated in a holiday book drive for Cameroon. The book drive invited fourth graders and families to donate books for the Africa Study Abroad Reading Day Program. Reading Day, a partnership between C&J Mebinaps Primary School in Southwest Cameroon and Bloomsburg University, promotes literacy by bringing together elementary school children, parents, and teachers from throughout Kumbe, Cameroon for a day-long celebration of reading.

    Midway through their summer study abroad experience, the group of BU students made presentations at the colloquium on Contemporary Approaches to English language and Literary Studies in Cameroon co-organized by English faculty S. Ekema Agbaw and Stephanie Schlitz at the University of Buea. The colloquium, which attracted participants from several other universities in Cameroon, was organized in collaboration with the University of Buea’s department of English within the framework of the cooperation agreement between the two institutions. BU students also performed an adaptation of Real Mothers, a Cameroonian novel they studied in the Non-Western literature class.

    Lynda’s in the house

    Lynda.com Bloomsburg University faculty, students, and staff now have access to more than 1,500 courses and 85,000 individual online, video tutorials that are designed to improve their skills in the use of common and specialized software applications. The tutorials are presented in very short modules with excellent tables of content so it’s easy to jump right to the section you need to answer your question. You can also use your mobile iOS or Android devices to access the materials. Just go to lynda.bloomu.edu and sign in with your Husky ID. Watch How to use lynda.com, and you’ll be off and learning in a few minutes.

    Clowning around with Patch Adams

    Patch Adams with Michael Patte Recently Michael Patte, professor of educational studies and secondary education, and his colleague Cindy Dell Clark, associate professor of anthropology from Rutgers University, sat down for an interview with Patch Adams, the prominent American physician, social activist, clown, and author to discuss play and its relationship to wellness — a topic all three know very well.

    Throughout his 50-year career Patch has advocated for treating the patient and not the condition and during the two-hour interview he shared glimpses of his life’s work, which was the inspiration of a Hollywood movie in 1998, starring Robin Williams.

    During those fifty years Patch estimates he clowned at 10,000 death beds and held 2,000 children in his arms the day they died of starvation. Patte and Clark both study and teach about children, culture, and play with a focus on health related issues. A recent publication by Clark includes a child-centered ethnography on how children and their families cope with asthma and diabetes, “In sickness and in play: Children coping with chronic illness.” Patte recently examined how the field of playwork might combat factors marginalizing children’s play in America in, “Playwork: A profession challenging societal factors devaluing children’s play.”

    Faculty collaborate to enhance teaching

    TALE Academy Just prior to the spring semester, BU's Teaching Excellence Academy Fellows of 2013 completed a week studying course design through TALE. The Fellows studied L. Dee Fink's Creating Significant Learning Experiences to create a framework for thoughtfully re-imagining how their courses. In addition, faculty participants:
    • developed and exchanged ideas about how to incorporate more active learning into their classes
    • learned how to provide students with meaningful feedback from Ted Roggenbuck, director of the Writing Center
    • developed an appreciation for how diversity should be part of any course design with the help of Brian Johnson, director of the Frederick Douglass Institute
    • and explored theories of student motivation with Karen Hamman, director of University Tutorial Services, in order to apply these ideas to their course design

    The week was capped off with Fellows sharing their course designs to solicit feedback from colleagues. (Front L-R) Cindy Surmacz, Mary Nicholson, Kristin Pelczarski and Cindy Venn. (Back L-R) Stephanie Schlitz, Jennifer Venditti, Angela Hess, Craig Young and Kevin Ball

    Spring brings several changes across campus

    BU’s spring semester begins with new unit names and locations and new faculty and staff roles. Tom Fletcher, associate vice president and dean of extended programs, heads an area now known as the Division of Extended Programs. Making up Extended Programs are corporate and continuing education; Advance College Experience (ACE), summer college and off-campus programs; international education; global and multicultural education; and community college degree completion, distance education and workforce development.

    The Office of Academic Internships is now part of the Division of University Advancement. Alison Stone-Briggs is director; Donna Murphy is assistant to the director. And Jerrold Harris has joined the Office of Planning and Assessment as coordinator for compliance and assessment. These members of the campus community are serving in temporary roles:

    • Richard Angelo, acting associate dean, College of Science and Technology
    • Melissa Cheese, interim director, ACT 101/EOP
    • Carl Chimi, a special project, Husky Tales, Offices of the Provost and Marketing and Communications
    • John Hranitz, interim coordinator, Undergraduate Research Center, Office of Graduate Studies
    • Jonathan Lincoln, acting dean, College of Science and Technology
    • Robert Marande, acting assistant provost for strategic initiatives
    • Cristina Mathews, assessment fellow, Office of Planning and Assessment
    • Luke Springman, adviser to international students, global education and BU representative to the PASSHE International Education Council
    • Stephanie Schlitz, co-chair, Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) Accreditation Reporting
    • Mark Tapsak, co-chair, Strategic Planning and Resource Council (SPARC) II

    Faculty gain new perspectives on teaching

    Lilly Conference BU faculty recently attended the Lilly Conference at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, where they spent four days learning “Evidence-Based Learning and Teaching," as well as participated in numerous sessions about teaching in higher education. The faculty who attended will share some of what they learned with colleagues during TALE seminars in the spring 2013 semester. Travel was made possible by the Provost office and Dean of Graduate Studies.

    Presentation topics included:

    • But What Can We Do on Monday? Identifying Lessons Learned, Promising Applications, and Test Driving New Cats From the Upcoming 3rd Edition
    • How Research-Based Approaches to Cross-Cultural Teaching Can Inform Our Practice: Findings And Implications From A National Study of Indigenous Teaching
    • Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology Out of Your College Classroom Will Improve Student Learning
    • 5 Transformative Teaching Practices
    • What Happened to Borders and Tower Records? How Universities Remain Relevant
    • Achieving Learning Goals by Design (Instead of by Good Fortune)
    • What Research Tells Us About How People Learn

    (L-R) Beverly Natividad, communication studies; Denise Davidson, counseling and college student affairs; Howard Lee, finance; and Mykola Polyuha, languages and cultures.

    Two faculty earn tenure this spring

    Alana Atchinson, assistant professor of sociology, social work and criminal justice, and Molly Marnella, assistant professor of early childhood and adolescent education, have been granted tenure effective Spring 2013.