Student Research

Student Research

COST Student Research
 


Student Research Examples - Spring 2015 Research and Scholarship Day

For more information on student research contact the faculty advisor.

Examining the Clinical Utility of Subjective Visual Horizontal (SVH) Testing During Unilateral Centrifugation (UC) Testing

COST Student Research

Alyssa Whinna

Dr. Jorge Gonzalez; Audiology and Speech Pathology Department

Examining the clinical of SVH during unilateral centrifugation will be the expansion of current knowledge regarding the assessment of otolithic function. Assessing otolithic function has historically been a limitation of traditional balance testing, as traditional balance testing primarily assesses the horizontal semicircular canals. Examining SVH of individuals with normal vestibular function during unilateral centrifugation will enable the creation of more clinical tools to evaluate otolithic function, thus allowing a proper diagnosis of individuals with vestibular dysfunction. This research was presented at the American Balance Society on March 4, 2015, and was well received with interesting questions regarding the clinical utility of SVH during CH testing.

The Relationship between Low-cost Estimates of Airflow vs. Pneumotachograph Measured Airflow

COST Student Research
Laura Kocsis and Eric Smith
Dr. Shaheen Awan; Audiology and Speech Pathology Department

The research study contributed to further knowledge regarding the use of the phonation quotient (a low-cost estimate of airflow often used in voice analysis).

Effects of Neuropeptide Y on Sexual Behaviors of Female Hamsters

Samirah Boksmati
Dr. Candice Klingerman; Biological and Allied Health Sciences Department

Understanding how specific proteins of the brain effect eating habits and therefore sexual behavior is especially important, and may one day lead to a cure for obesity. Maintaining proper nutritional uptake is essential for achieving reproductive success, thus overeating has evolved over time in order to ensure and increase success rates. This research is sponsored by a BU Research and Scholarship Grant.

Effects of Specific Neuropeptide Y Subtypes (Y1, Y5) on the Sexual and Ingestive Behavior of Female Hamsters

Shandna Burroughs
Dr. Candice Klingerman; Biological and Allied Health Sciences Department

Overeating has improved reproductive success but in a developing world this mechanism has resulted in obesity and other health complications. Understanding how certain neuropeptides influence ingestive and sexual behavior might give us insight on how to combat obesity. This research is sponsored by a BU Research and Scholarship Grant.

Missed Departure: the Potential Role of GNG4 in Kallmann Syndrome

COST Student Research
Andrew King
Dr. William Schwindinger; Biological and Allied Health Sciences Department

Kallmann Syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by a defect in cell migration which in some cases is linked to mutations in G-protein coupled receptor signal transduction. by modeling the condition in vitro using cell culture and genomic editing we can gain a greater understanding of the mechanisms behind the condition.

Ecological Feeding Niche Overlap Between Three Species of Sea Cucumbers; Sclerodactyla briareus, Thyonella gemmata, and Leptosynapta tenuis

COST Student Research
Jessica Baker
Dr. Thomas Klinger; Biological and Allied Health Sciences Department

Two evolutionary similar species cannot occupy the same ecological niche. Resource partitioning studies will help to understand niche overlap and species co-occurrence between three species of sea cucumbers found near Wallops Island, Virginia. This research will be presented to the Chincoteague Bay Field Station.

Association of Patient Genotypes and Phenotypes

COST Student Research
David Strawn
Drs. Carl Hansen and Janet Robishaw (Geisinger Health System); Biological and Allied Health Science Department

Personalized healthcare is a promising medical model that is currently undergoing intense study, which aims to tailor medical decisions, practices, and/or products to individual patients on the basis of genetics. "The mission of the Translational Medicine Initiate (at Geisinger) is to discover the genetic and molecular bases of human disease and to translate this new knowledge into clinical practice."

The Differences in Foraging Behavior and Predation of Small Mammals in Human Populated Environments Compared to Natural Environments

COST Student Research
Bryce Foster
Dr. Marianna Wood; Biological and Allied Health Science Department

As residents of Pennsylvania, we live alongside eastern gray squirrels and eastern chipmunks as they search for food during much of the year. This study sought to answer the question of how human proximity affects their foraging behavior so that we may better understand our relationship with these familiar creatures.

Genetically Modified Immune System Cells for Cancer Treatment

COST Student Research
Neil Breskiewicz
Dr. Carl Hansen; Biological and Allied Health Science Department

The use of genetically modified cells from a patient’s own immune system would allow for a more specific targeting of cancer treatment to increase effectiveness and decrease side effects.

Relative Population Density and Behavioral Time Budgets of Seaside Dragonlets (Erythodiplax bernice) in Impaired and Intact Saltmarsh Habitats

Alan Newnham
Dr. Clay Corbin; Biological and Allied Health Sciences Department

Through statistical analysis of our latest study, Summer 2014, we determined males are less dense than females in both intact and impaired salt marsh habitats. While there is no difference in density with respect to the relative impairment of the environment, dragonlets may be quick to colonize or respond to the restoration efforts. We do not have historical data on dragonlet population densities during the oyster harvesting years, but we assume, given the amount of human activity in the area and a lack of suitable habitat, dragonlet densities were lower. However, males and females both are relatively quiescent in the impaired habitat suggesting this habitat may be an ecological sink. For future studies an incorporation of wider sampling of sites with increased life history scope will help to elucidate environmental factors affecting dragonlet density and source-sink dynamics. This research was presented at the Fall 2014 BU College of Science and Technology Research and Scholarship Day.

Differential Methylation of Gng7 in Normal B6 Mouse Tissues

Ali Hussain
Dr. William Schwindinger; Biological and Allied Health Sciences Department

Gng7, observed in both humans and mice, is a gene with roles in cell-to-cell communication. Methylation leads to decreased expression of genes and in this case may be linked to certain cancers (head and neck) and diseases such as Huntington's disease.

Synthesis of a Second-Generation Triazole/NHC Rh(I) Complex: Application in Catalytic Hydrogen Transfer

Kelly Barko
Dr. Philip Osburn; Chemistry and Biochemistry Department

This research will help discover catalysts that will enable coal liquefaction using organic solvents as hydrogen sources, a safer alternative to the use of hydrogen gas.

Chemical Analysis of Solid-State Shear Pulverization Processed Plastics

James Gamler
Dr. Mark Tapsak; Chemistry and Biochemistry Department

Solid-state shear pulverization (SSSP) is a process that uses mechanical energy to chemically modify polymers. This mechanochemical alternation is performed by SSSP without the use of a catalyst or solvent. SSSP used high-shear forces, generated by a twin-screw extruder, to break chemical bonds and form free radicals which can recombine, thereby resulting in new polymer bonds. The polymer mixtures tested in this study were water insoluble (polyurethane at 80%) and water soluble (either poly (1-vinylpyrrolidone) at 20% or poly (1-vinylpyrrolidone-co-2-dimethylyamindethylmethacrylate at 20%). After SSSP was performed, mixtures were analyzed in an attempt to obtain direct evidence of polymer-to-polymer bond formation. Analyses including gel permeation chromatography (GPC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) were performed on these mixtures to test for the new chemical and physical properties.

Cobalt Catalyzed Cyclotrimerization Alkynes: A Comparison Between Using a Microwave Reactor and Traditional Methods

Jocelyn Legere
Dr. Eric Hawrelak; Chemistry and Biochemistry Department

A previously prepared cobalt compound, pentafluorophenylcyclopentadienyldicarbonyl colbalt {[(C6F5)C5H4]Co(CO)2 1}, has been shown to catalytically produce substituted aromatics. Catalytic reactions were initially performed via refluxing in Schlenk glass ware. Using a microwave reactor, the reaction time can be significantly reduced. Catalytic production of aromatics with 1 versus a literature prepared catalyst, (C5H5)Co(CO)2 2, was compared. It was determined that using the fluorinated catalyst the reaction rate was improved versus 2. All compounds were analyzed via 1HNMR. This research was presented at the National American Chemical Society Spring Conference in Denver, Colorado.

The Calculation of Equilibrium Constants and Equivalent Conductivities of Aqueous Lanthanide Solutions

COST Student Research
Frank Rodemer
Dr. Greg Zimmerman; Chemistry and Biochemistry Department

This research results in the calculation of two critical fundamental quantities: equilibrium constants and limiting equivalent conductivities. An equilibrium constant gives the proportion of the dissolved chemical species that exist in an aqueous solution for a given salt, and the limiting equivalent conductivity gives how fast the species will move in an electrical field. These quantities are a necessity to the understanding and advancement in a very broad range of fields, from industrial to geochemical processes. This research was sponsored by the BU Honors Program and will be presented at the 2016 American Chemical Society National Meeting in San Diego, California.

Drinking Before the Drills: A Study of Three Pristine Water Sites in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania

COST Student Research
Shelby Coleman
Drs. Cynthia Venn and Christopher Hallen; Environmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences, and Chemistry and Biochemistry Departments

During the last decade, technologies have improved allowing for extraction of natural gas from the Marcellus shale at depths of eight to ten thousand feet, opening Pennsylvania for drilling and fracking. Economic reality, however, has caused oil and gas companies to delay drilling at many of the sites for which they have obtained drilling permits. This affords us the opportunity to measure natural non-impacted chemical qualities (aka baseline data) at several ponds in Sullivan County, specifically Sones Pond, Beech Lake and Shumans Lake. This research was sponsored by the Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity Grant (URSCA) and also by the Degenstein Foundation. This research was presented in poster format at the Northeast Section Meeting of the Geological Society of American.

Acid Mine Drainage Treatment System - Pine Forest Mine in St. Clair, Pennsylvania

COST Student Research
Audra I. Mitchell
Drs. Cynthia Venn; Environmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences Department

The anoxic limestone drain channels water flowing from the Pine Forest Mine underground through a limestone channel. Oxygen contact with the water is eliminated to keep metal oxides in solution. The water reaches the surface and flows into four consecutive ponds. The limestone raises the pH and alkalinity of the acidic water. Metal oxides precipitate out of the solution and settle at the bottom of the ponds. The treatment system improves the overall quality of the water This research was sponsored by the BU Department of Environmental, Geographical, and Geological Sciences, and will presented at Geographic Society of America in Maryland in October 2015.

Vegetation Cover and Groundwater Monitoring in a Tidally Restricted Salt Marsh in Greenbackville, Virginia

COST Student Research
Matthew Mattesini
Drs. Cynthia Venn and Jennifer Whisner; Environmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences Department

Vegetation mapping with satellite imagery and hydrologic studies can aid coastal wildlife managers to monitor the effects of global sea-level rise. This research was sponsored by the Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity Grant (URSCA) and also by the Richard White Geosciences Research Fund. This research was presented at the ASLO 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting in Granada, Spain with positive feedback.

A look at the Effectiveness of Scarlift 15 Acid Mine Drainage Treatment System on Discharge into Shamokin Creek Near Ranshaw (Northumberland County), Pennsylvania

Kyle Halat
Drs. Cynthia Venn and Christopher Hallen; Environmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences and Chemistry and Biochemistry Departments

This research shows the efficacy of the Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) treatment system, Scarlift 15. During the sampling period, we looked at how well the AMD passive treatment system worked at filtering out dissolved solids. It was only working at 44% efficiency. The remaining solids, predominately iron, aluminum, and manganese flow through Shamokin Creek affecting towns and people downstream. The aluminum levels exceed water quality criteria established as protective of aquatic life by the Environmental Protection Agency. This research was sponsored by the BU Environmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences Department and was presented at the Northeast Section Meeting for the Geological Society of America.

Geochemical Analysis of Streams in the Sullivan Branch Watershed: Eastern Source Waters of the East Branch of Fishing Creek, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania

COST Student Research
Daniel Tompkins, Kody Bond and Frank Napkora
Dr. Cynthia Venn; Environmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences Department

This study shows the basic composition and quality of headwater streams that feed the streams near BU. Also, this gives a baseline data for any kind of hydraulic fracturing or contamination in our streams in Pennsylvania. This research was presented at the Northeast Section Meeting for the Geological Society of America.

The Importance, Genesis, and Spatial Extent of Transient Islands within the Susquehanna River in the Ridge and Valley Province of Pennsylvania

COST Student Research
Brett Diehl
Dr. Matthew Ricker; Environmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences Deparment

Forested riparian areas have beneficial water quality improvement functions, such as the ability to remove contaminants and nutrients from flood waters. There are a large number of islands in the Susquehanna River that likely perform these functions, but little research has been done on these landscapes.

Rate Pressure Product During Upper and Lower Body Ergometer Exercise

COST Student Research
Rebecca Hale
Dr. Timothy McConnell; Exercise Science Department

Rate pressure product (RPP) is the product of heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and is used as a marker of oxygen demands by the heart. Upper and lower body exercise elicit different RPP responses, which can be used to create safe exercise prescriptions. This research will be presented at the Annual American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Conference in San Diego, California in May 2015.

Bringing Cybersecurity to Cameroon

COST Student Research
Michael Grube
Drs. Scott Inch and Helmut Doll, and Mr. Brian Seely; Instructional Technology and Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Departments

Instructional Technology and Digital Forensics are currently two of the most sought out fields in science and technology. Here at Bloomsburg, we have two of the best programs and this project brings those two together in collaboration with the country of Cameroon.

Building a Partial C Compiler

COST Student Research
William Evans
Dr. William Calhoun; Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Department

Compilers are a complicated piece of software that allow computer programmers to create other pieces of software in their programming language of choice. In this talk we will walk through the basics of creating key parts of a compiler for the C programming language.

Monitor Fatigue

COST Student Research
Arrah Bragmann, Carley Griffin and Zabrina Shvartsman
Dr. Michelle Ficca; Nursing Department

Monitor fatigue is a safety issue that affects local citizens if their child is admitted and is placed on a monitor. This research was sponsored by Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pennsylvania and presented there on April 17, 2015.

The Proper Use of Telemetry

COST Student Research
Christina Flaherty and Angela Yohey
Dr. Michelle Ficca; Nursing Department

This quality improvement research looks at whether or not patients at Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pennsylvania are appropriately put on cardiac monitoring. Unnecessary telemetry is inconvenient for patients, staff and an extra cost to both the individual and the hospital.

Reviewing Orders Prior to Procedure Day Reduces Average Pre-Op Time for First Case Patients

COST Student Research
Heather Brown, Brandi McDonald and Caroline Toomey
Dr. Michelle Ficca and Ms. Christine Raup, RN, CPN; Nursing Department

At Geisinger Medical Center, there are significant delays in the process between patients arriving at check-in and entering the operating room. Studies have shown that the first case starts set the pace for the day. This research was presented at Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pennsylvania on April 17, 2015.

Non-Formulary Medication Reconciliation: Perceptions vs. Results

COST Student Research
Heather Lechleitner, Sherry Romanoskie, Patricia Drumm, Valerie Breznak and Dustin Stamm
Dr. Michelle Ficca and Ms. Diane Polomboa (Geisinger Medical Center); Nursing Department

The findings that resulted from our Quality Improvement Project indicate that the perception of a problem may not always indicate an evidence-based issue. The experience, although resulting in outcomes that were not expected, allowed an excellent opportunity for enhanced interdisciplinary collaboration, development of problem solving strategies, and utilization communication strategies that can be implemented in future relations with interdisciplinary teams. This research was presented at Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pennsylvania on April 17, 2015.

Identification of Values Associated with Excellence, Ethics, and Engaging in an Outpatient Hospital Work Environment

COST Student Research
Caroline Toomey
Dr. Joan Miller; Nursing Department

The purpose of this study was to understand staff members’ perceptions of their work in the Department of Urology at Geisinger Medical Center in terms of the essentials of Good Work, which include excellence, ethics, and engagement. Methods used in this study can be applied to studies in other professional settings by highlighting the potential of using the Appreciative Inquiry framework to identify values associated with excellence, ethics, and engagement in an individual’s work. This research was sponsored by the BU Honors Program and has been presented at the Geisinger Nursing Research Conference in Danville, Pennsylvania in October 2014, the National Collegiate Honors Council Conference in Denver, Colorado in November 2014 and at the Fall 2014 BU College of Science and Technology Research and Scholarship Day.

Nurses’ Attitudes and Person Centered Care with Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias in the Acute Care Clinical Setting

Anna Miller
Dr. Margie Eckroth-Bucher; Nursing Department

This study focused on both nursing students' and registered nurses' attitudes that they had when caring for a patient that had Alzheimer's disease or another type of dementia. This research was sponsored by the Sigma Theta Tau (Nursing Honor Society).

The Development of the PCQN-Pediatrics

Abigail Novak
Dr. Debra Stayer, RN-BC, CCRN; Nursing Department

Pediatric palliative care is a relatively new field in which no psychometrically accepted instrument to assess nurses’ understanding of pediatric palliative care principles exists. The purpose of the study is to determine if the presented PCQN-Pediatrics is a reliable instrument that measures nurses’ knowledge of pediatric palliative care principles. This research was sponsored by the BU Honors Program and will be presented at the National Collegiate Honors Council in Chicago, Illinois in November 2015.

An Investigation of Radiation Levels from the Misuse of Handheld X-ray Fluorescence Devices

COST Student Research
Robert Riley
Dr. David Simpson; Physics and Engineering Technology Department

Handheld X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) devices have rapidly become widely used in many different industries including the identification of the metal composition of jewelry. Due to the use of such devices in pawn shops and metal assay centers, a study of the potential radiation levels to the user caused by the improper use of such devices was conducted. This research will be presented at the annual Health Physics Society Meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana on July 15, 2015.

The Effects of Scattered Radiation on Medical Personnel Wearing Lead Aprons

COST Student Research
Austin Olson
Dr. David Simpson; Physics and Engineering Technology Department

This research is currently just looking at the safety of medical personnel in regards to the aprons they wear to protect themselves from radiation. This in itself is important, but steps are also being taken to expand this into changing the way that all lead aprons are examined and tested for effectiveness. This research will be presented at the annual Health Physics Society Meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana on July 15, 2015.

LabVIEW Control of Ultra-cold Atomic Instrumentation

Angela Hess
Dr. John Huckans; Physics and Engineering Technology Department

Central to a modern ultra-cold atomic physics laboratory is precision control of the timing and voltages or currents of the myriad pieces of equipment required to create a cloud of atoms. This talk focuses on synchronization of the digital and analog control lines which run the rubidium-87 ultra-cold atomic physics laboratory.

Bloomsburg Kepler Viewer - Toward a K2 pipeline

Collin Shoop
Drs. Nada Jevtic and Peter Stine; Physics and Engineering Technology Department

The Kepler Space Telescope was launched in March of 2009 with the mission of searching for and identifying exoplanets by collecting data. Our research explores ways of using that data to give a better understanding of star behavior, which will then aid in the search for earth-like planets. This research was presented at Dickson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania on April 25, 2015.

An Analysis of a Kepler 2 m Dwarf using Non-linear Noise-reduction

COST Student Research
Noah Long
Drs. Nada Jevtic and Peter Stine; Physics and Engineering Technology Department

Noise or random frequencies/data are everywhere in the universe. by learning how to reduce that noise on something as complicated a variable star, one can use the same methods to reduce any random data that may exist in the world to create better correlations between different things. This research was presented at Dickson University, Carlisle, Pennsylvania on April 25, 2015.

Kepler 2: Non-linear Noise Reduction of an Isolated Pulsator

Bryan Semon
Dr. Peter Stine; Physics and Engineering Technology Department

One of the hardest parts of analyzing stars is that the instruments are so sensitive, and the stars so far away, that white noise can cover up any of the actual data. This research focused on techniques to eliminate the "fake" data find patterns among the thousands of data points. This research was presented at Dickson University, Carlisle, Pennsylvania on April 25, 2015.